Hematopathology Case Study: A 67 Year Old Female with a Sore Throat

History 

A 67 year old female presents with a two-month history of sore throat. She endorses dysphagia and left-sided otalgia but denies voice changes, shortness of breath, hemoptysis, weight loss, fever or night sweats. She has smoked 1 pack/day for 41 years and occasionally drinks alcohol. Her past medical history is notable for systemic lupus erythematosus for which she takes Plaquenil.

Physical examination slightly elevated systolic blood pressure. She is afebrile. Pertinent neck exam findings include mild tonsillar asymmetry (left slightly larger than right), and a firm mass at left base of tongue, and a 3 cm lymph node in the neck (left level III). A biopsy sample was taken from the tongue mass. 

Biopsy

EBV-1

H&E stained sections reveal sheets of large lymphocytes. The lymphoid cells are medium to large in size with irregular nuclear contours and prominent nuclei. Areas of necrosis are prominent. No specific areas of epithelial ulceration are noted. Immunophenotypic characterization of the larger cells reveals positivity for CD20, CD30, CD79a, PAX5, MUM1, Epstein Barr virus encoded RNA (EBER) and a variable Ki-67 proliferation index, which is up to 60-70% in the larger cells, but around 20-30% overall. Only rare cells are positive for BCL-2 and BCL-6. The lymphoma cells are negative for keratin AE1/AE3, CD10, CD4, CD8, CD21, CD23, CD7, CD5, Cyclin D1, CD68, CD56, and CD43. The background T cells express CD5 and CD7 and are a mixture of CD4 and CD8 with CD4 predominance.

We considered the diagnosis of EBV-positive mucocutaneous ulcer (a more indolent entity); however, the lack of history of an ulcer/ulceration and the presence of a mass-lesion (with additional adenopathy) does not support this diagnosis.

The findings are most consistent with EBV-positive DLBCL, NOS (WHO 2017), previously known as EBV positive DLBCL of the elderly (WHO 2008). 

Discussion 

Epstein Barr Virus, a member of the Herpesviridae family is mostly known for causing Infectious Mononucleosis. However, the ubiquitous virus which is present in about 90% of adults but often asymptomatic1, has a predilection for epithelial cells including B-cells.2 Incorporation of the viral genome and viral takeover of the cells proliferative machinery underlies the pathogenesis of any EBV-related disease/malignancy. It has been associated with a gastric carcinoma, fulminant hepatitis, undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and B cell, T cell and NK cell lymphomas3, including EBV+ diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (DLBCL-NOS).

EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (EBV+ DLBCL-NOS) was formerly known as EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the elderly. The WHO classification substituted “not otherwise specified” in place of “for the elderly” to reflect two things: 1) EBV is associated with other specific neoplastic Large B-Cell diseases such as lymphomatoid granulomatosis, and 2) EBV+DLBCL can affect younger individuals as well as the elderly. 2

EBV+DLBCL-NOS patients may occur in nodal or extranodal sites, with up to 40% presenting with extranodal sites at least in the early stages. Patients may be asymptomatic with or without B symptoms but usually, patients present with rapidly enlarging tumors at single or multinodal sites, as well as at extranodal sites. 4

The patient’s presentation with sore throat and the finding of neck mass with EBV-positive large B-cells associated with ulcer-like necrosis raises a differential diagnosis that ranges from reactive to malignant. Table 1 shows a comparison between three differential diagnoses: EBV+DLBCL-NOS; EBV-positive mucocutaneous ulcer; and infectious mononucleosis.

EVB-t1
Table 1. Comparison of 3 EBV-positive differentials in the head and neck

Unfortunately, there is currently no uniformly agreed standard of treatment for EBV+DLBCL which has a worse prognosis than EBV negative DLBCL.2 The standard treatment for DLBCL (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone- R-CHOP) is used but it responds poorly to treatment, with a median survival of 2 years.

Therefore, early detection by clinical suspicion and testing all DLBCL patients for EBV is very important.2 

 References

  1. Tsuchiya S. Diagnosis of Epstein–Barr virus-associated diseases. Critical Reviews in Oncology and Hematology. 2002;44(3):227-238. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1040842802001142. doi: 10.1016/S1040-8428(02)00114-2.
  2. Murthy SL, Hitchcock MA, Endicott-Yazdani T, Watson JT, Krause JR. Epstein-barr virus–positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Proceedings (Baylor University.Medical Center). 2017;30(4):443-444. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5595389/.
  3. Okano, Motohiko, MD, PhD|Gross, Thomas G., MD, PhD. Acute or chronic life-threatening diseases associated with epstein-barr virus infection. American Journal of the Medical Sciences, The. 2012;343(6):483-489. https://www.clinicalkey.es/playcontent/1-s2.0-S0002962915309435. doi: 10.1097/MAJ.0b013e318236e02d.
  4. Swerdlow S, Campo E, Harris NL, Jaffe ES, Pileri SA, Stein H, Thiele J, Arber D, Hasserjian R, Le Beau M. WHO classification of tumours of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues. 2017.
  5. Dunmire SK, Hogquist KA, Balfour HH. Infectious Mononucleosis. Current topics in microbiology and immunology. 2015;390:211-240. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-22822-8_9.

 

Adesola picture-small

-Adesola Akinyemi, M.D., MPH, recently earned his MPH-Health Policy and Management from New York Medical College. He plans on pursuing residency training in pathology. His interests include cytopathology, neuropathology, and health outcomes improvement through systems thinking and design.

Mirza-small

-Kamran M. Mirza, MD PhD is an Assistant Professor of Pathology and Medical Director of Molecular Pathology at Loyola University Medical Center. He was a top 5 honoree in ASCP’s Forty Under 40 2017. Follow Dr. Mirza on twitter @kmirza.

Hematopathology Case Study: A 72 Year Old Female with History of Lung Adenocarcinoma

Case history 

A 72 year-old female with a history of stage IA lung adenocarcinoma diagnosed in 2009 s/p resection underwent a surveillance CT scan of the chest which revealed an enlarged right upper lobe paramediastinal lung nodule. A subsequent MRI of the abdomen and PET scan revealed mediastinal lymphadenopathy with numerous boney lesions. Due to the prior history of lung cancer, a right iliac bone biopsy was performed.

Diagnosis

myesar-he-10
H&E, 10x
myesar-he-20
H&E, 20x
myesar-he-50
H&E, 50x
myesar-cd-45
CD45
myesar-cd-117
CD117
myesar-cd-34
CD34
myesar-cd-68
CD68
myesar-cd-56
CD56
myesar-mpo
MPO
myesar-cd-43
CD43

Sections of bone show an extensive intramedullary infiltration by large cells with moderate amounts of cytoplasm, irregular nuclear contours, moderately condensed chromatin and some cells with inconspicuous nucleoli.

By immunohistochemistry, the neoplastic cells are immunoreactive for CD45, MPO, CD68, CD56, and CD43. The cells are negative for cytokeratins, TTF-1, CD20, CD10, PAX5, BCL6, MUM1 and CD79a. CD3 and CD5 highlight rare scattered T-cells.

Overall, in the context of multiple osseous lesions, these findings are representative for a myeloid sarcoma.

Discussion 

Myeloid sarcoma is a tumor mass consisting of myeloid blasts with or without maturation occurring at any site other than the bone marrow. Infiltration of blasts at any site are not classified as a myeloid sarcoma unless there is effacement of tissue architecture. Frequent sites for involvement by a myeloid sarcoma include skin, lymph node, gastrointestinal tract, bone, soft tissue, and testis.

Detection of a myeloid sarcoma is considered as an equivalent diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia. It may precede or coincide with AML as well as be a presenting finding in those that relapse from AML.

Morphologically, the blasts may or may not show features of maturation and efface the architecture of the involved site. Immunophenotypically, CD68 is considered the most commonly expressed marker followed by MPO, CD117, lysozyme, CD34, TdT, CD56, CD30, glycophorin and CD4. Interestingly enough, CD123 may be expressed in those cases that also have inv(16). It must be emphasized that those cases that meet criteria for a mixed phenotypic acute leukemia (MPAL) cannot be classified as a myeloid sarcoma.

By cytogenetics, 55% of myeloid sarcomas have aberrant cytogenetic findings including monosomy 7, MLL rearrangements, inv(16), and other chromosomal changes. In the pediatric population, t(8;21) may be observed and is less frequent in adults. NPM1 is mutated in 16% of cases.

Lastly, the differential diagnosis should be kept broad in cases that appear lymphoid in nature yet do not mark appropriately. It is often expressed that the primary morphologic differential is a lymphoma, including lymphoblastic lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm, and other small round blue cell tumors of childhood.

Reference

  1. Swerdlow SH, Campo E, Harris NL, et al.  WHO Classification of Tumours of Haematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues. Lyon, France: IARC Press; 2008

 

PhillipBlogPic-small

-Phillip Michaels, MD is a board certified anatomic and clinical pathologist who is a current hematopathology fellow at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. His research interests include molecular profiling of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma as well as pathology resident education, especially in hematopathology and molecular genetic pathology.

Hematopathology Case Study: A 68 Year Old Man with Dyspnea on Exertion

Case History

A 68 year old male with no significant past medical history who enjoys long distance cycling presented to an outside emergency department with dyspnea on exertion. Laboratory values at the outside facility showed profound anemia (Hb 10 g/dL) and physical exam revealed lymph adenopathy. The patient was discharged but presented again to his primary care physician with profound dyspnea on exertion, especially after climbing one flight of stairs. Of note, his anemia had worsened with a new Hb of 7 g/dL. For evaluation of the anemia, the patient had a Coomb’s test and it was positive, overall consistent with cold agglutinin disease. For evaluation of the lymphadenopathy, a CT abdomen and chest revealed celiac, portocaval, mesenteric and retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy as well as mild splenomegaly. Due to these findings, the patient presented to Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center for further evaluation and biopsy of a retroperitoneal lymph node.

A core needle biopsy of a retroperitoneal lymph node was obtained per the recommendation of hematology/oncology.

Diagnosis

AITL-1
H&E, 10X
AITL-2
H&E, 20X
AITL-3
H&E, 50X
AITL-4
CD3
AITL-5
CD20
AITL-6
CD10
AITL-7
CD4
AITL-8
CD7
AITL-9
CD21
AITL-10
Ki-67
AITL-11
EBER ISH
AITL-12
PD1
AITL-13
CXCL13

The core needle biopsy material demonstrated a lymphoid population that was polymorphic in appearance with medium to large sized lymphocytes with moderate amounts of pale cytoplasm, irregular nuclei, vesicular chromatin, and some cells with prominent nucleoli. The background cellular population is composed of a mixed inflammatory component including small lymphocytes, scattered neutrophils, eosinophils, and histiocytes.

By immunohistochemistry, the medium to large sized cells with pale cytoplasm are positive for CD3, CD2, CD4, and CD5 with complete loss of CD7. CD20 highlights scattered background B-cells. CD21 is positive in disrupted follicular dendritic meshworks. CD10 and BCL6 are negative in neoplastic cells. PD1 is positive in neoplastic cells with a subset co-expressing CXCL13. By Ki-67 immunostaining, the proliferation index is 50-70%. By in situ hybridization for Epstein-Barr virus encoded RNA, a subset of cells are positive.

Overall, with the morphologic and immunophenotypic features present, the diagnosis is that of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.

Discussion

Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) is one of the most common types of peripheral T-cell lymphoma and accounts for 15-20% of T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and 1-2% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Clinical features include presentation with late stage disease with associated generalized lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, systemic symptoms, and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia. Of note, this patient did have an SPEP that was within normal limits. Other findings, although less common, include effusions and arthritis. Laboratory findings often include cold agglutinins with hemolytic anemias, a positive rheumatoid factor (RF), and anti-smooth muscle antibodies. A hallmark of AITL is the expansion B-cells positive for EBV is seen, which may be an indicator of underlying immune dysfunction. The clinical course is often aggressive with a median survival of less than three years and often succumb to infectious etiologies because of an immune dysregulation.1

The pathogenesis and relation to other TFH neoplasms of PTCL, NOS is poorly understood. Recent literature indicates dysregulation in key pathways, including the CD28 and TCR-proximal signaling genes, NF-kappaB/NFAT pathway, PI3K pathway, MAPK pathway, and GTPases pathway.2 The complexity of these pathways has long been an issue for TFH lymphoproliferative disorders and has provided insight to potential molecular signatures (see figure 1 adapted from Vallois 2016).

AITL-14
Figure 1 from Vallois 2016

Another recent publication provided additional information regarding molecular insights. Confirmed mutational analyses reveals a high proportion of cases carry a TET2 mutation with less frequent changes in DNMT3A, IDH2, RHOA, and PLCG1. Specifically, RHOA, PLCG1, and TNFRSF21 encode proteins critical for T-cell biology and most likely promote differentiation and transformation into an aggressive clinical course (see figure 2 adapted from Wang 2017).3

AITL-15
Figure 2 adapted from Wang 2017

Overall, AITL is an uncommon TFH cell derived lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by a TFH immunophenotype, expanded and arborizing high endothelial venules, expansion of the follicular dendritic cell meshworks, and EBV positive B-cells in a background of a polymorphic infiltrate. Although it is hypothesized that the underlying mechanism of neoplasia is related to immune dysfunction, new molecular insights have demonstrated that multiple events occur ranging from early molecular changes to later acquired mutations that allow for malignant transformation.

References

  1. Swerdlow, S., et al., WHO Classification of Tumours of Haematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues, 4th. ed., IARC press: 2008
  2. Vallois, D., et al. “Activating mutations in genes related to TCR signaling in angioimmunoblastic and other follicular helper T-cell-derived lymphomas,” 2016; 128(11): 1490-1502.
  3. Wang, M., et al., “Angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma: novel molecular insights by mutation profiling,” 2017; 8(11): 17763-17770.

 

 

PhillipBlogPic-small

-Phillip Michaels, MD is a board certified anatomic and clinical pathologist who is a current hematopathology fellow at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. His research interests include molecular profiling of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma as well as pathology resident education, especially in hematopathology and molecular genetic pathology.

Show Us Some Skin

Which epidermal layer is indicated by the arrow?

  • A. Stratum corneum
  • B. Stratum germinativum
  • C. Stratum granulosum
  • D. Stratum lucidum
  • E. Stratum spinosum

Skin1

 

The answer is E, stratum spinosum. The stratum spinosum, also known as the prickle cell layer of the skin, is often several cell layers deep, and is located immediately above the stratum germinativum. Cells in this layer are polygonal, and are connected to each other by numerous desmosomes. During fixation, the cell membrane retracts around desmosomal contact points, giving the cells a prickly appearance. The cells contain many bundles of intermediate filaments as well as keratinosomes, which are membrane-bound granules thought to deposit a “toughening” layer on the surface of the cell membrane.

Skin2

 

The stratum germinativum (also known as the basal layer) is composed of a single layer of cells adjacent of the basal lamina. The cells are tall cuboidal or columnar, and are connected to the basement membrane by hemidesmosomes, and to other cells by desmosomes. Cells in the basal layer are mitotically active, and contain numerous polyribosomes and intermediate filaments.

Skin3

 

The stratum granulosum is 3 to 5 cell layers thick, and is composed of flattened, polygonal cells arranged with the long axis parallel to the basement membrane. The cytoplasm of these cells contains numerous basophilic granules, called keratohyalin granules, which are thought to be keratin precursors.

The stratum lucidum is not truly a distinct layer of skin, but rather a staining artifact. It is visible in some sections of thick skin as a glassy-appearing, eosinophilic artifact at the bottom of the stratum corneum. It is not present in this particular image of epidermis.

Skin4

 

The stratum corneum is the outermost layer of skin. The thickness of this layer varies considerably from region to region in the body. The cells of this layer are dead, flattened, and fused together, with completely keratinized cytoplasm.

Skin5

 

Krafts

-Kristine Krafts, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Pathology at the University of Minnesota School of Medicine and School of Dentistry and the founder of the educational website Pathology Student.

Routine Pap Smear from a 33 Year Old Woman

You are reviewing a routine Papanicoloaou smear from a 33 year-old female. She has no complaints and appears healthy. A representative field from her Pap smear is shown here. What organism is the most likely cause of the morphologic changes seen here?

pap1

  1. Chlamydia trachomatis
  2. Human papillomavirus
  3. Trichomonas vaginalis
  4. Leptothrix
  5. Gardnerella vaginalis

 

 

The diagnosis in this case is Chlamydial infection. Genital infection by Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the world. In women, chlamydial infection of the cervix is frequently asymptomatic, as it was in this patient. If untreated, however, the infection can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility and ectopic pregnancy.

Chlamydia trachomatis is a tiny, gram-negative bacterium that exists in two different forms: the elementary body, which is the infectious form, and the reticulate body, which is the replicative form. While Chlamydial organisms are too small to be visible with a gram stain, large, glassy inclusions containing both reticulate bodies and elementary bodies are occasionally clearly visible within cells, as seen in the squamous epithelial cells in this image (see arrows).

pap2

 

Krafts

-Kristine Krafts, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Pathology at the University of Minnesota School of Medicine and School of Dentistry and the founder of the educational website Pathology Student.

The Value of Electives (Both Internal and External) During Pathology Residency

It’s been a while since my last blog. I haven’t had as much time and energy as I would like this past year. For now, I’ll just say…appreciate all that your chief residents do because much more time and effort lies beneath the surface than everyone is able to see.

But the topic for this blog is the value of electives during pathology residency. Our programs vary with respect to electives in terms of number and ability to take them externally or not. My previous program had five electives that could be taken internally or externally. However, external electives did not receive salary support and I didn’t take any electives although I could’ve during my two years in Chicago. Since we had a decent number of electives, many residents scheduled them internally during fourth year to have lighter months to study for boards although a handful did utilize them during earlier years for external electives.

My current program has two and we do receive salary support with external electives. For my first, I had an extra month of hematopathology internally because I wanted to see another perspective on one of my chosen subspecialties. Internal electives are good to spend more focused time in an area of subspecialty interest that you may have for fellowship. It also allows for the opportunity to develop deeper relationships with the faculty who will most likely be writing your letters of recommendation for that fellowship. They may also provide you with the opportunity to become more involved in research and/or publications (eg – book chapters, case reports, research articles) with a mentor and these are all helpful in enhancing your fellowship and future job applications and build up your CV.

Currently, I’m on an external elective at the institution where I’ll do both my hematopathology and molecular genetic fellowships. I’m laying the groundwork for molecular hematopathology research now that hopefully results in data analysis over the ensuing months to culminate in an abstract submission for the American Society of Hematology (ASH) which has a deadline only a month after I start fellowship. I also want to use this time away to get to know people at my future program better, prepare for my eventual move here, and study for boards. Hopefully, I’ll also get a sense of the daily work flow as I am also attending signouts and intra- and interdepartmental conferences so that I can manage my time as efficiently as I can from day 1 of fellowship. I really like the culture and people here, but that’s subject matter for a future blog. I also am enjoying the benefits of attending inter-program activities as TMC is the largest medical center in the world with active interaction and collaboration between member hospitals. Not so much in my case since I obtained both my consecutive fellowships last year as a PGY-3, but for many, the value of an early external elective is that it can be seen it as an “audition” rotation to obtain a desired fellowship. You may even be able to ask for an interview before you finish (which saves you time and money). I also have some friends who were offered fellowship spots at the end of their elective rotation because they impressed the fellowship director. Obtaining fellowship positions is pretty competitive and there tends to be fewer spots than there are for residency. And in many cases, positions are not even available if an internal candidate is chosen early (even during their PGY-1) so anything to augment your fellowship application is a plus.

Now that I’ve mentioned external electives, I’d like to give some advice on setting up an external elective. First, start as EARLY as possible! Even a year or more before isn’t too early to ask about getting the ball rolling. Start preparing and updating your CV from your PGY-1 as you’ll need this for both external elective and fellowship applications. Scan and keep a PDF of all your vaccinations and work-related health requirements (eg – PPD/Quantiferon results, flu vaccine, hepatitis B testing, MMR and hepatitis B antibody titers, and N-95 fit testing) as well because its likely you’ll also have to include this in your external elective application.

I initiated the elective rotation request about a half year prior to the actual rotation. And even then, that was not early enough and everything came down to the wire. It’s far more complicated than when we applied for elective rotations as a medical student and takes much more time. Since we are now physicians, you are more than likely required to have at least a medical permit in that state to rotate and this process can take a while. Also the back-and-forth between program coordinators and the respective GME departments can appear glacial at times, and in my case, was the main cause of delay. I hit several delays at obtaining paperwork (especially between Christmas and New Year’s when many staff were off at both programs, my medical school, and the Texas Medical Board where I needed paperwork from). It can be time-consuming to have to make multiple phone calls, and often, the process cannot be completed until its antecedent step has been approved. I know residents who have had to postpone external rotations because paperwork between GME departments (eg – PLAs or malpractice agreements) were not in place in time. Maintaining constant and open communication between all parties involved is a must and sometimes easier said than done the more people that are involved.

In addition to obtaining the state medical permit (which generally requires an application fee; in my case, $135), there may be other requirements that are also time-consuming and financially expensive. You may be required to do pre-employment-type health screening (in my case, a $36 urine drug screen) at your own cost as you are not a true employee. I also had to become ACLS certified (at $120, despite being BLS certified and a former American Red Cross CPR instructor). But since I’m going to be a fellow here, I can get it reimbursed through my GME funds and would have to do it later anyways so I might as well do it now. But if you are not doing an elective at your future fellowship institution, it’s good to find out what items may incur cost in your application for your elective since you are not likely to get reimbursed and so you can decide whether those expenses are acceptable. One way to defray costs is to apply for grants such as the ASCP subspecialty grant which is administered to six residents twice a year (Jan/Aug). In fact, the next deadline is this Friday, Jan 15th! You can find more information on how to apply at http://www.ascp.org/Residents/Resident-Grants.

 

Chung

-Betty Chung, DO, MPH, MA is a fourth year resident physician at Rutgers – Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, NJ.

You Make the Diagnosis: A 62 Year Old Female with Hemoptysis and Fatigue

A 62-year-old female presents with hemoptysis and fatigue. A large mass is found adjacent to the right main bronchus. A representative field is shown here. What is the diagnosis?

smallcell

  1. Invasive adenocarcinoma
  2. Squamous cell carcinoma
  3. Adenocarcinoma in situ (formerly bronchoalveolar carcinoma)
  4. Small cell carcinoma
  5. Large cell carcinoma

 

 

The diagnosis in this case is small cell carcinoma. Also called “oat cells,” the malignant cells in this tumor tend to be round to somewhat elongated in shape, with the typical “salt-and-pepper” chromatin of neuroendocrine tumor cells. The cells are often so closely apposed that their nuclear contours show a characteristic “molding” effect. Small cell carcinoma is a fast growing tumor (note the large mitotic figure at 4 o’clock) with a poor prognosis.

 

Krafts

-Kristine Krafts, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Pathology at the University of Minnesota School of Medicine and School of Dentistry and the founder of the educational website Pathology Student.