Blood Bank Case Study: Transfusion Transmitted Malaria

Case Study

A 26 year old African American female with sickle cell anemia presented to a New York emergency room with cough, chest pain, fever and shortness of breath. Laboratory results showed an increased white blood cell count, slightly decreased platelet count and a hemoglobin of 6.2 g/dl. Her reticulocyte count was 7%, considerably below her baseline of 13%. Consulting the patient’s medical records revealed history of stroke as a child and subsequent treatment with chronic blood transfusions. She was admitted to the hospital for acute chest syndrome and aplastic crisis and care was transferred to her hematologist. Two units of RBCs were ordered for transfusion.

The blood bank technologists checked the patient’s blood bank history and noted her blood type was A, Rh(D) positive, with a history of a warm autoantibody and anti-E. The current blood bank sample confirmed the patient was blood type A, RH(D) positive with a negative DAT but the antibody screen was positive. Anti-E was identified. Per request of the hematologist, phenotypically similar units were found and the patient was transfused with 2 units of A RH(negative), C/E/K negative, HgS negative, irradiated blood. The patient’s hemoglobin rose to 8g/dl and she was discharged from the hospital 3 days after transfusion.

Ten days after discharge the patient returned to the emergency room with symptoms including aching muscles, fever and chills. A delayed transfusion reaction was suspected. A type and screen was immediately sent to the blood bank. The post transfusion type and screen remained positive for anti-E, DAT was negative. No additional antibodies were identified. However, a CBC sent to the lab at the same time revealed malarial parasites on the peripheral smear. The patient was consulted for a more complete medical history and reported that she had never traveled outside of the country. A pathology review was ordered and the patient was started on treatment for Plasmodium falciparum.

plasfal1

Discussion

Red Blood cell transfusions can be life saving for patients with sickle cells anemia. These patients are frequently transfused by either simple transfusion of red cell units or by exchange transfusion. Because of this, alloimmunization is reported to occur in 20% to 40% of sickle cell patients.1 Blood bank technologists are very diligent in adhering to strict procedures and follow a standard of practice aimed to prevent transfusion reactions. While preventing immune transfusion reactions may be the most forefront in our minds when transfusing the alloimmunized patient, it is important to consider transfusion transmitted diseases as a potential complication of blood transfusions.

Malaria is caused by a red blood cell parasite of any of the Plasmodium species. Mosquito transmitted infection is transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito. Transfusion-transmitted malaria is an accidental Plasmodium infection caused by a blood transfusion from a malaria infected donor to a recipient.

Donors, especially those from malarial endemic countries who may have partial immunity, may have very low subclinical levels of Plasmodium in their blood for years. Even these very low levels of parasites are sufficient to transmit malaria to a recipient of a blood donation. Though very rare, transfusion-transmitted malaria remains a serious concern for transfusion recipients. These transfusion-transmitted malaria cases can cause high percent parisitemia because the transfused blood releases malarial parasites directly into the recipient’s blood stream.

Blood is considered a medication in the United States, and, as such, is closely regulated by the FDA. Blood banks test a sample of blood from each donation to identify any potential infectious agents. Blood donations in the US are carefully screened for 8 infectious diseases, but malaria remains one infectious disease for which there is no FDA-approved screening test available. For this reason, screening is accomplished solely by donor questioning.2 A donor is deferred from donating if they have had possible exposure to malaria or have had a malarial infection. Deferral is 12 months after travel to an endemic region, and 3 years after living in an endemic region. In addition, a donor is deferred from donating for 3 years after recovering from malaria. It is important, therefore, for careful screening to take place by questionnaire and in person, to make sure that the potential donor understands and responds appropriately to questions concerning travel and past infection.

Malaria was eliminated from the United States in the early 1950’s. Currently, about 1700 cases of malaria are reported in the US each year, almost all of them in recent travelers to endemic areas. From 1963-2015, there have been 97 cases of accidental transfusion-transmitted malaria reported in the United States. The estimated incidence of transfusion-transmitted malaria is less than 1 case in 1 million units.4 Approximately two thirds of these cases could have been prevented if the implicated donors had been deferred according to the above established guidelines.3 While the risk of catching a virus or any other blood-borne infection from a blood transfusion is very low, a blood supply with zero risk of transmitting infectious disease may be unattainable. With that being said, the blood supply in the United Sates today is the safest it has ever been and continues to become safer as screening tests are added and improved. Careful screening of donors according to the recommended exclusion guidelines remains the best way to prevent transfusion-transmitted malaria.

References

  1. LabQ, Clinical laboratory 2014 No.8, Transfusion Medicine. Jeanne E. Hendrickson, MD, Christopher Tormey, MD, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine
  2. Technical Manual, editor Mark K. Fung-18th edition, AABB. 2014. P 201-202
  3. https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/about/facts.html. Accessed April 2018
  4. The New England Journal of Medicine. Transfusion-Transmitted Malaria in the United States from 1963 through 1999. Mary Mungai, MD, Gary Tegtmeier, Ph.D., Mary Chamberland, M.D., M.P.H., June 28, 2001. Accessed April 2018
  5. Malaria Journal. A systematic review of transfusion-transmitted malaria in non-endemic areas. 2018; 17: 36. Published online 2018 Jan 16. doi: 1186/s12936-018-2181-0. Accessed April 2018
  6. http://www.aabb.org/advocacy/regulatorygovernment/donoreligibility/malaria/Pages/default.aspx

 

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-Becky Socha, MS, MLS(ASCP)CM BB CM graduated from Merrimack College in N. Andover, Massachusetts with a BS in Medical Technology and completed her MS in Clinical Laboratory Sciences at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell. She has worked as a Medical Technologist for over 30 years. She’s worked in all areas of the clinical laboratory, but has a special interest in Hematology and Blood Banking. When she’s not busy being a mad scientist, she can be found outside riding her bicycle.

To Be (MDS) or Not To Be? The Conundrum of Cytoplasmic Vacuolation in Hematopoietic Precursors

Every hematopathologist and pathology trainee knows to be wary of the myriad of causes that could mimic the dysplastic changes seen in marrows involved by MDS. Many times morphology alone, without genetic or cytogenetic evidence of clonality can be tricky. The list of things that can recapitulate changes seen in MDS seems to grow longer every day – and with it the length of our ‘canned comments’ on ruling out reactive causes of dysplasia. Within the recent past, two bone marrow biopsies crossed my microscope, both sent to ‘rule out’ MDS. Both had almost identical morphologic findings, but very different diagnoses. Here are some representative images from the marrow aspirates and iron stains:

mds
Figure 1. Representative Wright-Giemsa stained cells from Case 1 (A and B) with accompanying iron stain (C) showing numerous ring sideroblasts.  Representative Wright-Giemsa stained cells from Case 2 (D) with accompanying iron stain (E) showing some ring sideroblasts. 

Discussion

Images A through C come from case 1, a 67-year-old woman with a past medical history of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) complicated by hepatic encephalopathy and recurrent ascites who underwent bone marrow biopsy for new onset pancytopenia with transfusion-dependent anemia. The marrow was slightly hypercellular for age and showed progressive trilineage maturation. Granulocytic and erythroid progenitors did not reveal quantitatively significant dysplasia. The one dysplastic megakaryocyte identified is pictured here (panel A). Interestingly many erythroid and granulocytic precursors showed cytoplasmic vacuolation (panel B showing granulocytic vacuolation). An iron stain (panel C) revealed 44% ring sideroblasts. Case 2 is represented in images D and E and was from a 64-year-old man with no significant past medical history who presented with lethargy and anemia. This marrow was also slightly hypercellular for his age and showed borderline-significant dysplasia in megakaryocytic maturation. Granulopoiesis and erythropoiesis were unremarkable except for cytoplasmic vacuolations in many cells (panel D). An iron stain showed 8% ring sideroblasts (panel E).

Both cases were signed out descriptively, urging the clinician that we needed to rule out reactive causes of dysplasia before a definitive diagnosis of MDS could be rendered. In both cases we suggested waiting for the cytogenetics results for a more comprehensive analysis. Additionally, we recommended testing for serum copper since copper deficiency can be the cause of dysplastic morphology, cytoplasmic vacuolation, and ring sideroblasts.

Case 1 revealed markedly diminished copper and normal cytogenetics. Copper replenishment was curative. Case 2 revealed normal copper levels and a complex karyotype that contained numerous MDS-associated abnormalities confirming the clonal, and therefore malignant nature of these changes. Despite being almost identical morphologically, these case were diagnostically and prognostically poles apart.

Copper is an element that serves as a micronutrient required for hematopoiesis. It’s presence in many readily available foods including meat, fish, nuts, and seeds renders diet-related copper deficiency a rare phenomenon. Zinc-supplementation is one of the causes of copper deficiency in published reports. Copper deficiency has been well documented to mimic dysplastic changes seen in MDS; but these morphologic findings and cytopenia are reversible. Characteristically, cytoplasmic vacuolation is an important morphologic clue that there could be an underlying paucity of serum copper.  Another aspect of copper deficiency is the presence of ring sideroblasts which also can mean MDS. It is very important to consider this differential diagnosis when dealing with marrow specimens sent to rule out MDS. This Lablogatory post highlights the significant overlap between presentation and morphologic findings between MDS and copper deficiency supporting the notion that a high index of suspicion, good communication, stat copper levels, and cytogenetics or MDS FISH studies are very helpful in delineating benign from malignant.

References

  1. Dalal N. et al. Copper deficiency mimicking myelodysplastic syndrome. Clin Case Rep. 2015 May; 3(5): 325–327.
  2. Willis M.S. Zinc-Induced Copper Deficiency: A Report of Three Cases Initially Recognized on Bone Marrow Examination. AJCP. 2005 Jan; 123(1): 125–131
  3. D’Angelo G. Copper deficiency mimicking myelodysplastic syndrome. Blood Res. 2016 Dec; 51(4): 217–219.
  4. Karris S and Doshi V. Hematological Abnormalities in Copper Deficiency. Blood 2007 110:2677

 

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-Kamran M. Mirza, MD PhD is an Assistant Professor of Pathology and Medical Director of Molecular Pathology at Loyola University Medical Center. He was a top 5 honoree in ASCP’s Forty Under 40 2017. Follow Dr. Mirza on twitter @kmirza.

Hematopathology Case Study: A 45 Year Old Male with Mediastinal Mass

Case History

A 45 year old male underwent a chest MRA for aortic dilation due to his history of an aneurysmal aortic root. Upon imaging, an incidental anterior mediastinal mass was seen that measured 4.0 cm. In preparation for an upcoming cardiac surgery, the patient underwent a thymectomy with resection of the mass. The sample is a section from the mediastinal mass.

Diagnosis

HVCD-HE-2x
H&E, 2x
HVCD-HE-4x
H&E, 4x
HVCD-HE-lollipop
H&E, 10x. Green Arrows: “lollipop” germinal centers
HVCD-HE-twinning
H&E, 10x. Red arrow: focal “twinning” of germinal centers

Sections show an enlarged lymph node with several follicles demonstrating atrophic-appearing germinal centers which are primarily composed of follicular dendritic cells. These areas are surrounded by expanded concentrically arranged mantle zones. Focal “twinning” of germinal centers is present. Additionally, prominent centrally placed hyalinized vessels are seen within the atrophic germinal centers giving rise to the “lollipop” appearance.

By immunohistochemistry, CD20 highlights B-cell rich follicles while CD3 and CD5 highlight abundant T-cells in the paracortical areas. CD10 is positive in the germinal centers while BCL2 is negative. CD21 highlights expanded follicular dendritic meshwork. CD138 is positive in a small population of plasma cells and are polytypic by kappa and lambda immunostaining. HHV8 is negative. MIB1 proliferation index is low while appropriately high in the reactive germinal centers.

Overall, taking the histologic and immunophenotypic findings together, the findings are in keeping with Castleman’s disease, hyaline vascular type. The reported clinical and radiographic reports suggest a unicentric variant.

Discussion

Castleman’s disease comes primarily in two varieties: localized or multicentric. The localized type is often classified as the hyaline vascular type (HVCD). Demographically, it’s a disease of young adults but can be found in many ages. The most common sites for involvement are the mediastinal and cervical lymph nodes.

The classic histologic findings of HVCD involve numerous regressed germinal centers with expanded mantle zones and a hypervascular interfollicular region. The germinal centers are predominantly follicular dendritic cells and endothelial cells. The mantle zone gives a concentric appearance, often being likened to an “onion skin” pattern. Blood vessels from the interfollicular area penetrate into the germinal center at right angles, giving rise to another food related identifier, “lollipop” follicles. A useful diagnostic tool is the presence of more than one germinal center within a single mantle zone.

The differential diagnosis of HVCD includes late stage HIV-associated lymphadenopathy, early stages AITL, follicular lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, and a nonspecific reactive lymphadenopathy. A history of HIV or diagnostic laboratory testing for HIV would exclude the first diagnosis. AITL usually presents histologically as a diffuse process but atypia in T-cells with clear cytoplasm that co-express CD10 and PD-1 outside of the germinal center are invariably present. EBER staining may reveal EBV positive B immunoblasts in early AITL, which would be absent in HVCD. The most challenging differential would include the mantle zone pattern of mantle cell lymphoma. Flow cytometry revealing a monotypic process with co-expression of cyclin D1 on IHC would further clarify the diagnosis.1

Overall, unicentric Castleman’s disease is usually of the hyaline vascular type. Surgical resection is usually curative in these cases with an excellent prognosis.2

 

References

  1. Jaffe, ES, Harris, NL, Vardiman, J, Campo, E, Arber, D. Hematopathology. Philadelphia: Elsevier Saunders, 2011. 1st ed.
  2. Ye, B, Gao, SG, Li, W et al. A retrospective study of unicentric and multicentric Castleman’s disease: a report of 52 patients. Med Oncol (2010) 27: 1171.

 

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-Phillip Michaels, MD is a board certified anatomic and clinical pathologist who is a current hematopathology fellow at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. His research interests include molecular profiling of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma as well as pathology resident education, especially in hematopathology and molecular genetic pathology.

Hematology Case Study: The Race to Save a 48 Year Old Man from a Rare Disease

A 48-year-old Caucasian male presented to a Baltimore Emergency Room complaining of fever, chills, and aches. He stated he had not been feeling well for the past week. His symptoms had progressed rapidly over the last 3 days to include night sweats, nausea and excessive somnolence. History taken in the ER revealed the patient had returned 10 days prior from a Safari in Botswana and Zambia. The patient was admitted to the ICU, in shock, with a BP of 75/50. Even though the patient had taken anti-malarial medication, the doctors suspected malaria. Blood was sent to the lab for a blood parasite exam and treatment for malaria was started while the doctors waited for the confirmation.

In the Hematology laboratory, technologists perform microscopy of thick and thin blood smears to look for malarial parasites. The thin smear is a typical Wright Giemsa stained wedge smear, and the thick smears are prepared and stained so that the red blood cells are lysed, and the sample is concentrated, making examination easier. Thorough, careful examination of the thick smear is aimed to identify whether a particular parasite is present, but they require a long drying period and take several hours to prepare and read. Thin smears can detect the parasites but also permit identification of particular species of malaria. While the thick smears were drying the technologist examined the thin smear.

The technologist who examined this patient’s thin smears saw parasites (image 1) under her microscope. She consulted with a supervisor and pathologist to confirm, and the patient’s doctor was notified that the patient did not have malaria, but instead, had Trypanosoma! This was an exciting find in the laboratory, as there have been only 40 cases seen in the US in the past 50 years.

tryp1
Image 1. This slide shows the parasite, in dark blue. The parasite causes
African trypanosomiasis, also known as sleeping sickness
(Courtesy of Greater Baltimore Medical Center).

The race for diagnosis and treatment did not stop there, as there are 2 types of African trypanosomiasis, or African sleeping sickness, and effective and appropriate treatment must be started in a timely fashion. Both types look identical on a blood smear and both are considered universally fatal, if not treated. West African trypanosomiasis and East African trypanosomiasis are caused by the tsetse fly, which only lives in rural Africa. The patient stated he did remember being bitten by tsetse flies, and because there had been such a short span of time between being bitten and the onset of symptoms, doctors concluded that the patient had the rarer and fast-acting East African trypanosomiasis, which can kill within months.

Epidemiologists at CDC were contacted, who then consulted other infectious disease specialists at CDC. There are 2 treatments depending the stage of the disease. Surinam is the first line of defense, but melarsoprol, which is arsenic-like and very toxic, must be used if the parasites have reached the central nervous system. Because of the urgent need to start treatment, emergency shipments of both drugs were flown to Baltimore. The patient was started on Surinam to reduce the number of parasites in his blood to a level low enough to allow a spinal tap to be performed. After confirming that the CSF showed no signs of the parasite, treatment with surinam was continued and the patient was discharged a week later and has made a full recovery.

Because of the excellent work done by the medical technologists who made the first discovery, the speed with which the critical calls were made, the actions of the doctors involved, and the cooperation of the CDC, this patient received his first dose of Surinam a little over 24 hours after his blood was sent to the lab. This case shows the importance of a thorough medical and travel history in differential diagnosis. It also illustrates the importance of the competency evaluations and surveys in which all laboratory professionals are required to participate. None of the technologists, doctors or scientists involved had ever actually seen a case of African Trypanosomiasis, they had only read about it in books and seen it on competency assessments.

This case is based on an actual case from 2016. My coworker, Gail Wilson, was the technologist who first saw the Trypanosoma on the slides. Many thanks to Gail for her keen eye and attention to detail!

tryp2
Image 2: L&R: Trypanosoma brucei in thin blood smears stained with Giemsa. Center: A close up of a tsetse fly. Credit: DPDx

 

References 

  1. Jon E. Rosenblatt Barth Reller Melvin P. Weinstein.pages 1103-1108, Laboratory Diagnosis of Infections Due to Blood and Tissue Parasites Clinical Infectious Diseases, Volume 49, Issue 7, 1 October 2009; retrieved March 2018 from https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/49/7/1103/316703
  1. Ivo Elliott, Trupti PatelJagrit Shah, and Pradhib Venkatesan. West-African trypanosomiasis in a returned traveller from Ghana: an unusual cause of progressive neurological decline BMJ Case Rep. 2014; 2014: bcr2014204451. Published online 2014 Aug 14.doi: 1136/bcr-2014-204451; retrieved March 2018 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4139564/
  1. Lena H. Sun. Medical Detectives raced to save a man from a rare, ‘universally lethal’ disease; retrieved March 2018 from https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2016/12/22/medical-detectives-raced-to-save-a-man-from-a-rare-universally-lethal-disease/?utm_term=.16d7b136bc47
  1. Parasites – African Trypanosomiasis (also known as Sleeping Sickness). Retrieved March 2018 from https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/sleepingsickness/
  1. DPDx- Laboratory Identification of parasites of Public Health Concern; retrieved March 2018 from https://www.cdc.gov/dpdx/

 

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-Becky Socha, MS, MLS(ASCP)CM BB CM graduated from Merrimack College in N. Andover, Massachusetts with a BS in Medical Technology and completed her MS in Clinical Laboratory Sciences at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell. She has worked as a Medical Technologist for over 30 years. She’s worked in all areas of the clinical laboratory, but has a special interest in Hematology and Blood Banking. When she’s not busy being a mad scientist, she can be found outside riding her bicycle.

 

Hematopathology Case Study: A 42 Year Old Female with Right Breast Mass

Case History

A 42-year-old female presented with a right breast mass at an outside hospital that was concerning for carcinoma. A core needle biopsy was performed of right breast mass and the case was sent for expert consultation.

Diagnosis

SHML5x
H&E, 5x
SHML10x
H&E, 10x
SHML20x
H&E, 20x
SHML50x
H&E, 50x

Sections of core needle biopsy material are composed primarily of adipose tissue shows a dense lymphohistiocytic infiltrate with histiocytes being the dominant cell type. Admixed plasma cells are present within the infiltrate. The histiocytes have abundant granular cytoplasm with irregular nuclear contours and some nuclei containing inconspicuous nucleoli. Frequent lymphocytic emperipolesis is identified. Immunohistochemistry performed at the outside facility show positivity for S100 and CD163 within the histiocytes, further highlighting the lymphocytic emperipolesis. Cytokeratin immunostains are negative.

Overall, the morphologic and immunophenotypic findings are consistent with a diagnosis of extranodal sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (Rosai-Dorfman disease).

Discussion

Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML) was first described by Rosai and Dorfman in 1969, however, similar findings may be present in extranodal sites thus earning the designation of Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD). Although primarily present in lymph nodes, RDD may involve extranodal sites with sinuses and skin being the most frequently affected tissue types. Clinically, RDD often maintains a benign and self-limited course but may undergo exacerbations and recur, requiring surgical management. On histologic examination, RDD involves a rich inflammatory infiltrate with histiocytes, plasma cells, and lymphocytes. The histiocytes usually display a unique phenotype in which lymphocytes are phagocytosed, a process termed emperipolesis. By immunohistochemistry, these histiocytes are positive for S-100 and histiocytic markers (CD68 and CD163) and are negative for CD1a1.

The largest cohort studied involved 423 cases with 182 having extranodal manifestations2. Chest involvement was first reported by Govender et al. in 1997 in a 34-year-old female3. Overall, RDD is considered rare with a slight male predilection and young African-Americans being the most commonly affected. Sites involved ranging from most common to least common include lymph nodes, skin, upper respiratory tract, and bone4.

Extranodal sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy, also known as Rosai-Dorfman disease, is a rare pathologic entity that histologically shows a dense lymphohistiocytic infiltrate and emperipolesis, a hallmark of the disease. Although lymph nodes are the most common site of involvement, extranodal sites may be affected and RDD should remain in the differential for lesions that contain abundant histiocytes, plasma cells, and lymphocytes as well as the classic feature of emperipolesis.

References

  1. Komaragiri et al.: Extranodal Rosai–Dorfman disease: a rare soft tissue neoplasm masquerading as a sarcoma. World Journal of Surgical Oncology 2013 11:63.
  2. Penna Costa AL, Oliveira e Silva N, Motta MP, Athanazio RA, Athanazio DA, Athanazio PRF: Soft tissue Rosai–Dorfman disease of the posterior J Bras Pneumol 2009, 35:717–720.
  3. Govender D, Chetty R: Inflammatory pseudotumour and Rosai–Dorfman disease of soft tissue: a histological continuum? J Clin Pathol 1997, 50:79–
  4. Montgomery EA, Meis JM: Rosai–Dorfman disease of soft tissue. Am J Surg Pathol 1992, 16:122–129.

 

PhillipBlogPic-small

-Phillip Michaels, MD is a board certified anatomic and clinical pathologist who is a current hematopathology fellow at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. His research interests include molecular profiling of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma as well as pathology resident education, especially in hematopathology and molecular genetic pathology.

 

Hematopathology Case Study: A 64 Year Old Man with Widespread Lymphadenopathy

Case history

A 64-year-old, previously healthy man presented with a history of cervical and axillary lymphadenopathy of unknown duration. He did not endorse night sweats, weight loss, or fever. Radiologic examination (CT chest and MRI abdomen) revealed numerous enlarged mediastinal, peritracheal, periaortic, periportal and retroperitoneal lymph nodes. He underwent excisional biopsy of a 3.5 cm axillary lymph node.

foll-lymph

Microscopic Description

Histologic examination of the node revealed distortion of nodal architecture by a proliferation of neoplastic-appearing follicles. Follicles were distinct from one another, and closely packed. In areas the follicles were present back-to-back. Follicular centers were comprised of mostly small, cleaved centrocytes and showed no obvious zonation. There was loss of tingible body macrophages.

Immunophenotyping

Immunohistochemical analysis revealed CD20-positive B cells in a follicular pattern. The germinal centers revealed an underlying follicular dendritic meshwork highlighted by staining for CD21. Interestingly, while the germinal centers demonstrated immunopositivity for BCL-6, there was minimal to absent CD10 staining on follicular B cells. Analysis of BCL-2 staining revealed only few cells to be positive within the follicular centers, consistent with resident follicular helper T cells (Th cells). Equivalent numbers of CD3 and CD5 positive T cells were noted in the interfollicular zones. The Ki-67 proliferation index was estimated at 15-20% within follicular centers. Flow cytometric phenotyping demonstrated a lambda light chain restricted clonal B-cell population expressing CD20, CD19 and, FMC7. These neoplastic B-cells were negative for CD5 and CD10 expression.

Diagnosis

The morphologic features were consistent with Follicular Lymphoma; however the phenotype (BCL-2 negativity in follicular centers) was unusual for this diagnosis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was negative for an IgH/BCL-2 fusion; however, a BCL-6 rearrangement at the 3q27 locus was detected in 70% of the cells.  Taken together, a diagnosis of Follicular Lymphoma with a BCL-6 rearrangement was given.

Discussion

Follicular lymphoma (FL) is a germinal center derived B-cell neoplasm. The majority of cases exhibit the pathognomonic translocation t(1418)(q32; q21). This translocation leads to overexpression of the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 protein, which can be detected by immunohistochemistry on germinal center B cells. Lymphoma cells are usually positive for germinal center origin markers BCL-6 and CD10 and do not co-express CD5. As exhibited in this case, FL can exhibit biologic heterogeneity and may not express these typical markers. The follicular proliferation with absence of germinal center zonation and tingible body macrophages as seen in this case represents classic morphology of follicular lymphoma but aberrant phenotypic markers [and absence of t(14;18)] may be a pitfall in this diagnosis.

FL with lacking of CD10 expression, BCL-2 expression, and t(14;18) translocation and harboring only BCL-6 positivity with 3q27 rearrangement is rare. Only few such cases have been reported in the literature. Published data reveals that the hallmark t(14;18) translocation is absent in about 10-15% of FL. The majority of these cases are negative for BCL-2 expression, and 9-14% of them demonstrate BCL-6 rearrangement (3q27 locus). While BCL-6 rearrangement can be present in both the usual t(14;18) harboring FL, and also in cases without t(14;18), the latter is rare. Interestingly, studies have shown BCL-6 rearrangements to be more frequent in in BCL-2 rearrangement negative FL – which is evidence of the anti-apoptotic role of non-rearranged BCL-6 in certain microenvironments.

One third of t(14;18) negative FL are also reported to have rare or negative expression of CD10. Morphologically, this subtype has been shown to have significantly larger follicles than  their t(14;18)-positive counterparts, but the distinction may not be obvious in all cases. Some of these cases are shown to have a component of monocytoid B cells. This findings can be problematic in differentiating these FL cases from marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) that can also harbor BCL-6 rearrangements and lack t(14;18), CD10 and BCL-2 positivity. Absence of prominent marginal zone proliferation, BCL-6 protein expression and characteristic genetic alterations present in MZL, such as trisomies 3, 7, and 18 can help differentiating MZL from t(14;18)-negative FL.

This case highlights the importance of morphologic evaluation of a excisional biopsy tissue, and FISH studies to help identify the rare t(14;18) negative FL. While the reported cases are few, there is no published difference in prognosis or survival when compared to t(14;18)-positive FL. As such, it is not clear whether the follicular lymphoma grading scheme applies to t(14;18)-negative FL; however, no significant grading difficulties or differences have been reported.

References

  1. Jardin F, Gaulard P, Buchonnet G, et al. Follicular lymphoma without t(14;18) and with BCL-6 rearrangement: a lymphoma subtype with distinct pathological, molecular and clinical characteristics. Leukemia. 2002;16:2309–2317
    2. Leich E, Salaverria I, Bea S, et al. Follicular lymphomas with and without translocation t(14;18) differ in gene expression profiles and genetic alterations. Blood. 2009;114(4):826-834.

 

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Aadil Ahmed, MD is a 3rd-year anatomic and clinical pathology resident at Loyola University Medical Center. Follow Dr. Ahmed on Twitter @prion87.

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-Kamran M. Mirza, MD PhD is an Assistant Professor of Pathology and Medical Director of Molecular Pathology at Loyola University Medical Center. He was a top 5 honoree in ASCP’s Forty Under 40 2017. Follow Dr. Mirza on twitter @kmirza.

Hematopathology Case Study: A 57 Year Old Male with History of Malignant Melanoma

Case History

A 57 year old male with a history of stage IA malignant melanoma presented with a new pink nodule on the right shoulder (see image provided) that has persisted for one month following a tetanus shot. Resultant specimen is a punch biopsy of the lesion.

calcl1.jpg

 

Diagnosis

calclhe10
H&E, 10x
calclhe20.jpg
H&E, 20x
calclhe50
H&E, 50x

 

calccd20
CD20
calccd3
CD3
calccd4
CD4
calccd8
CD8
calccd30low
CD30, low power
calccd30high
CD30, high power
calclgranzyme
Granzyme
calclperforin
Perforin

Sections show a punch biopsy of skin with a superficial as well as deep dermal infiltration of small and large lymphocytes. No epidermotropism is noted. An admixed background of inflammatory cells including eosinophils, neutrophils, and histiocytes is present.

By immunohistochemistry, CD2, CD4, and CD5 highlight the abundance of lymphocytes indicating a dominant T-cell population. CD30 highlights a major subset of larger lymphocytes that co-express perforin. Granzyme is positive only in a small subset of cells. CD3 is present in a subset of CD30 positive cells indicating downregulation of CD3 in neoplastic cells. By Ki-67, the proliferation index is focally high (70%). CD20 highlights rare B-cells. CD8 is positive in a small fraction of T-cells. EMA is negative.

Overall, the diagnosis is that of a primary cutaneous CD30 positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. The differential diagnosis includes lymphomatoid papulosis, type C and primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

Discussion 

Primary cutaneous CD30 positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders are the second most common cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (30% of cases). The primary groups within this entity include lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP) and cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (C-ALCL) is composed of larger cells that are anaplastic, pleomorphic, or immunoblastic morphology that express CD30 in over 75% of the tumor cells. C-ALCL most commonly affects the trunk, face, extremities, and buttocks and often present as a solitary or localized nodules or tumors with ulceration. Clinically, the lesions may show partial or complete remission similar to LyP but often relapse in the skin. Interestingly enough, approximately 10% of cases may disseminate to local lymph nodes.

The histologic pattern of C-ALCL demonstrates a non-epidermotropic pattern with cohesive sheets of large CD30 positive T-cells. Ulcerating lesions may show a morphologic pattern similar to LyP with abundant inflammatory cells such as histiocytes, eosinophils, neutrophils with few CD30 positive tumor cells. By immunophenotyping, the tumor cells are CD4 positive with variable loss of CD2, CD5 or CD3 and express cytotoxic markers such as granzyme B, TIA1, and perforin. Unlike systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma, C-ALCL does not express EMA or ALK.

The 10 year disease related survival of C-ALCL is 90%. Lymph node status or multifocal lesions does not alter prognosis significantly.

The differential diagnosis also include LyP, type C. These lesions often present on the trunk and extremities and are characterized by popular, papulonecrotic and/or nodular skin lesions. After 3-12 weeks, the skin findings may disappear. Up to 20% of LyP may be preceded by, have concurrent, or followed by another type of lymphoma such as mycosis fungoides (MF), C-ALCL, or Hodgkin lymphoma.1

Briefly, there are up to 5 types of LyP (types A-E).2,3 The more recently described LyP type D and E are determined by either simulating an epidermotropic aggressive CD8 positive CTCL and angiocentric and angioinvasive CD8 positive CTCL, respectively.

LyP has an excellent prognosis but since these patients may have other lymphomas, long term follow up is advised.

Overall, C-ALCL and LyP type C show considerable overlap both morphologically and clinically so close clinical follow up is recommended, however both demonstrate an excellent prognosis.

References

  1. Swerdlow SH, Campo E, Harris NL, et al. WHO Classification of Tumours of Haematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues. Lyon, France: IARC Press; 2008.
  2. Cardosa J, Duhra P, Thway Y, and Calonie E, “Lymphomatoid papulosis type D: a newly described variant easily confused with cutaneous aggressive CD8-positive cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma.” Am J Dermatopathol 2012 Oct; 34 (7): 762-765.
  3. Kempf W, Kazakov DV, Scharer L, et al. “Angioinvasive lymphomatoid papulosis: a new variant simulating aggressive lymphomas.” Am J Surg Pathol 2013 Jan; 37(1): 1-13.

 

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-Phillip Michaels, MD is a board certified anatomic and clinical pathologist who is a current hematopathology fellow at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. His research interests include molecular profiling of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma as well as pathology resident education, especially in hematopathology and molecular genetic pathology.