Hematology Case Study: A 20 Year Old with Anemia

Case History

A 20 year old Black male with a known history of HbS trait went to the primary care office for a pre-surgical evaluation for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy for symptomatic cholelithiasis. All physical exam findings were negative. The patient had blood work completed and was found to have mild anemia with microcytosis. On previous imaging, the spleen was noted to be slightly enlarged. Further workup included a peripheral blood smear, finding target cells, microspherocytes, folded cells, and rod-shaped Hb C crystals (see image below). No sickled RBCs were noted.

Image 1. Peripheral blood smear with anemia, increased polychromatphilic RBCs, numerous target cells and rare HbC crystals

Discussion

Hemoglobin C disease is an intrinsic red cell disorder caused by Hemoglobin C (Hb C). Hb C is a variant of normal Hemoglobin A (Hb A) that results from a missense mutation in the β-globin protein, replacing the glutamic acid at position 6 with a lysine molecule. The disease can be either in the homozygous state (Hb CC) or in the heterozygous states (Hb AC or Hb SC). The origin of this mutation was traced back to West Africa and is found to confer protection against severe manifestations of malaria. In the United States, the Hb C allele is prevalent in about 1-2% of the African American population. There is an equal incidence between gender, and the incidence of the homozygous disease (i.e., Hb CC) is only 0.02%. Nevertheless, these statistics may be under-representative, since the disease is generally asymptomatic.

Heterozygous individuals with Hb AC usually show no symptoms, while homozygous individuals with Hb CC can have mild hemolytic anemia, jaundice, and splenomegaly. When Hb C is combined with other hemoglobinopathies, such as Hemoglobin S (Hb S), more serious complications can result. Hb S is similar to HbC in that it arises from a missense mutation; ie, a valine is substituted for the glutamic acid at the 6th position on the β-globin protein. As a result of this mutation, HbS abnormally polymerizes when in the presence of low oxygen tension, leaving the red blood cells (RBCs) rigid and irregularly shaped. Sickle cell disease (SCD) typically is a result of homozygous Hb S mutations (i.e., Hb SS), but the disease can also come from Hb SC.

All clinical features of Hb SS can be seen in Hb SC, including painful vaso-occlusive crises, chronic hemolytic anemia, stroke, acute chest syndrome, etc. Nevertheless, Hb SC is generally a milder disease. The complications from HbSC disease are less severe and less frequent when compared to Hb SS. Fortunately, unlike those with Hb SS disease, patients with Hb SC disease do not experience autosplenectomy, but they can develop splenomegaly. There are two complications that occur in HbSC disease occur more frequently than in HbSS disease, and they include proliferative sickle cell retinopathy and avascular necrosis of the femoral head (the latter case presents especially in peripartum women). Therefore, patients with HbSC disease should follow up with ophthalmology and obstetrics to monitor these complications. Furthermore, patients with Hb SC disease can vary in the severity of symptoms and the resulting complications. For example, some patients may develop a severe anemia and require blood transfusions; whereas, other patients are minimally affected by the disease. Overall, patients with Hb SC disease tend to have a better life expectancy compared to those with Hb SS disease. Patients with Hb SS disease have an average life expectancy of 40 years, while those with Hb SC disease are expected to live into their 60s and 70s. In contrast to Hb SS and Hb SC disease, Hb CC disease does not have an increase in mortality. As mentioned earlier, Hb CC disease results only in mild anemia, asymptomatic splenomegaly, and largely absent clinical symptoms.

Pathologic features of Hb SC and Hb CC diseases can be seen on a peripheral blood smear (PBS). Hb CC disease does not show sickled RBCs, while Hb SC can show sickled RBCs though very rarely. More importantly, Hb C is prone to polymerize into characteristic crystals. Depending on the zygosity of the individual, the crystals take on a defining shape. In heterozygous individuals (Hb SC), the crystals are found as irregular, amorphous, or bent appearing, and the RBCs can take on a “spiked and hooked” appearance. In homozygous individuals (Hb CC), the crystals are elongate, straight, and uniformly dense (as seen in the case above). In addition to crystals, the PBS shows numerous target cells, scattered folded cells, and microspherocytes.

Ancillary studies for diagnosis of these diseases include Hb variant analysis, such as electrophoresis and high-pressure liquid chromatography. Cellulose acetate (alkaline) electrophoresis is a standard method used to separate Hb A, Hb A2, Hb F, Hb C, Hb S, and other variants according to charge. Some hemoglobin variants comigrate using this described method, so citrate agar (acid) electrophoresis can be used additionally to distinguish between these variants. In Hb CC disease, analysis shows nearly all Hb C with small amounts of Hb F (i.e., fetal hemoglobin) and HbA2 (i.e., a normal variant of Hb A, in which the hemoglobin molecule is made up of 2 α chains and 2 δ chains). In Hb SC disease, analysis demonstrates almost equal amounts of Hb S and Hb C.

References

  1. Aster JC, Pozdnyakova O, Kutok JL. Hematopathology: A Volume in the High Yield Pathology Series. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc.; 2013.
  2. Gao J, Monaghan SA. Hematopathology. Chapter 1: Red Blood Cell/Hemoglobin Disorders. 3rd edition. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018.
  3. Karna B, Jha SK, Al Zaabi E. Hemoglobin C Disease. 2020 Jun 9. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2020 Jan–. PMID: 32644469.
  4. Mitton BA. Hemoglobin C Disease. Medscape, 9 Nov. 2019, emedicine.medscape.com/article/200853-overview.
  5. Saunthararajah Y, Vichinsky EP. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. Chapter 42: Sickle Cell Disease: Clinical Features and Management. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018.

-Amy Brady is a 4th-year medical student at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. She is currently applying to AP/CP pathology residency programs. Follow her on Twitter @amybrady517.

-Kamran Mirza, MD PhD is an Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Medical Education, and the Vice-Chair of Education in the Department of Pathology at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. Follow him on Twitter @KMirza.

Hematology Case Study: Is it Pelger-Huët anomaly or Pseudo Pelger-Huët?

A 73 year old African American female had a CBC ordered as part of routine pre-op testing before knee surgery. The order for a CBC/auto differential and was run on our Sysmex XN-3000. CBC results were unremarkable, with the exception of a decreased platelet count. However, the instrument flagged “Suspect, Left shift?” and a slide was made for review. The CBC results are shown in Table 1 below.

Table 1. CBC results on 73 year old female.

Pelger-Huët anomaly (PHA), is a term familiar to medical laboratory professionals, but mostly from textbook images. PHA is considered to be rare, affecting about 1 in 6000 people. PHA has been found in persons of all ethnic groups and equally in men and women. The characteristic, morphologically abnormal neutrophils were first described by Dutch hematologist Pelger in 1928. He described neutrophils with dumbbell shaped, bi-lobed nuclei. The term ‘pince-nez’ has also been used to describe this spectacle shaped appearance. Pelger also noted that, in addition to hyposegmentation, there is an overly coarse clumping of nuclear chromatin. In 1931, Huët, a Dutch pediatrician, identified this anomaly as an inherited condition.

Pelger-Huët anomaly is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by a mutation in the lamina B receptor (LBR) gene on band 1q42. This defect is responsible for the abnormal routing of the heterochromatin and nuclear lamins, proteins that control the shape of the nuclear membrane.2 Because of this mutation, nuclear differentiation is impaired, resulting in white blood cells with fewer lobes or segments. In classic inherited PHA, cells are the size of mature neutrophils and have very clumped nuclear chromatin. About 60-90% of these neutrophils are bi-lobed either with a thin filament between the lobes, or without the filament. About 10-40% of total neutrophils in PHA have a single, non-lobulated nucleus. Occasional normal neutrophils with three-lobed nuclei may be seen.1 Despite their appearance, Pelger-Huët cells are considered mature cells, function normally and therefore can fight infection. It is considered a benign condition; affected individuals are healthy and no treatment is necessary for PHA.

Automated instruments may flag a left shift when they detect these Pelger-Huët cells. In this patient, the analyzer flagged a left shift and a slide was made and sent to CellaVision. The CellaVision pre-classified the Pelger-Huët cells as neutrophils, bands, and myelocytes. All of the neutrophil images were either bi-lobed or non-lobed forms. None of the neutrophils had more than 2 lobes. Eosinophils also had poorly differentiated nuclei. Cell images from this patient can be seen in Images 1-4.

Image 1. Images from CellaVision of bi-lobed “pince-nez” neutrophils with thin filament
Image 2. Non-terminally differentiated neutrophils pre-classified as bands on CellaVision. Bilobed variant without the thin filament.
Image 3. Non-lobed neutrophils with extremely coarse clumping of nuclear chromatin.
Image 4. Eosinophils in Pelger-Huët Anomaly.

If PHA is considered benign, with no clinical implications, why is it important to note these cells on a differential report? This slide was referred to our pathologist for a review. The patient had several previous CBC orders, but no differentials in our LIS. The pathologist reviewed the slide and, based on 100% of these neutrophils being affected, he reported “Pelger-Huët cells present. The presence of non-familial Pelger-Huët anomaly has been associated with medication effect, chronic infections and clonal myeloid neoplasms.” Thus, the importance of reporting this anomaly if seen on a slide. If the instrument flags a left shift, this is typically associated with infection. If these cells are misclassified as bands and immature granulocytes, with no mention of the morphology, there would be a false increase in bands reported and the patient may be unnecessarily worked up for sepsis.

An additional reason for reporting the presence of Pelger-Huët cells is that pelgeroid cells are also seen in a separate anomaly, called acquired or pseudo-Pelger-Huët anomaly (PPHA). PPHA is not inherited and can develop with acute or chronic myelogenous leukemia and in myelodysplastic syndrome. A type of PPHA may also be associated with infections or medications. Certain chemotherapy drugs, immunosuppressive drugs used after organ transplants, and even ibuprofen have been recognized as triggers for PPHA. PPHA caused by medications is typically transient and resolves after discontinuation of the drug. To add to causes, most recently, there have been studies published that report PPHA in COVID-19 patients.3

With several different causes of PHA/PPHA, a differential diagnosis is important. Is this a benign inherited condition, a drug reaction that will self-resolve after therapy is stopped, or something more serious? If Pelger-Huët cell are reported, it is important for the provider to correlate this finding with patient symptoms, treatments and history. There was no medication history and little other medical history in our case patient’s chart, and no mention of inherited PHA. The patient had also been tested for COVID-19 with her pre-op testing and was COVID negative. On initial identification of Pelger-Huët, a benign diagnosis that needs no treatment or work up would be the best outcome, so an attempt could be made to determine if the patient has inherited PHA. If other family members are known to have this anomaly, this would be the likely diagnosis as PHA is autosomal dominant. Family members can also easily be screened with CBC and manual differential. Molecular techniques are available to confirm PHA but are not routinely used. In the absence of this anomaly in other family members, it would need to be determined if the patient was on any medications that can cause pelgeroid cells. Inherited PHA and drug induced PPHA should be ruled out first because PPHA can also be predicative of possible development of CML or MDS. Considering this cause first could lead to unnecessary testing that might include a bone marrow aspirate and biopsy. Additionally, the entire clinical picture should be reviewed because in PPHA associated with myeloproliferative disorders there is usually accompanying anemia and thrombocytopenia and the % of pelgeroid cells tends to be lower.

Today most clinical laboratories have instruments that do automated differentials, and we encourage physicians to order these because they are very accurate and count thousands of cells compared to the 100 cells counted by a tech on a manual differential. Automated differentials are desirable for consistency and to improve turnaround times. Yet, it is important to know when a slide needs to be reviewed under the scope or with CellaVision. If a patient presents with a normal WBC and a left shift on the auto diff with no apparent reason, pictures can reveal important clinical information. Awareness of different causes of PHA/PPHA can relieve anxiety in patients and prevent extensive, unnecessary testing and invasive procedures.

References

  1. https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/957277-followup updated 8/4/2020
  2. Ayan MS, Abdelrahman AA, Khanal N, Elsallabi OS, Birch NC. Case of acquired or pseudo-Pelger-Huët anomaly. Oxf Med Case Reports. 2015;2015(4):248-250. Published 2015 Apr 1. doi:10.1093/omcr/omv025
  3. Alia Nazarullah, MD; Christine Liang, MD; Andrew Villarreal, MLS; Russell A. Higgins, MD; Daniel D. Mais, MD. Am J Clin Peripheral Blood Examination Findings in SARS-CoV-2 Infection . Pathol. 2020;154(3):319-329. 

-Becky Socha, MS, MLS(ASCP)CM BB CM graduated from Merrimack College in N. Andover, Massachusetts with a BS in Medical Technology and completed her MS in Clinical Laboratory Sciences at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell. She has worked as a Medical Technologist for over 30 years. She’s worked in all areas of the clinical laboratory, but has a special interest in Hematology and Blood Banking. When she’s not busy being a mad scientist, she can be found outside riding her bicycle.

Case Study Hematology: The Mouse Strikes again! Lymphocytes with Intracytoplasmic Inclusions

If you read my last blog, you heard the about the story “if You Give a Mouse a Cookie” by Laura Numeroff.4 The curious little mouse has a mind that never rests. As his mind wanders and hops from one thing to another, he keeps discovering more things to check out along the way. Medical laboratory lcientists are a lot like this. We’re a curious bunch, and, in investigations, one thing often leads to the next. Well folks, the mouse has struck again! We were given another cookie in the form of these beautiful cells.

Image 1. Lymphocytes with intracytoplasmic inclusions.

These cells were found by my coworker Liz Marr, MLS(ASCP), and the adventure began! First, we wanted to know what those were, and then we needed to find out more about them, and then, mostly, I wanted to know why in almost 40 years of working in and teaching hematology that I have never before seen this!

The story begins with our case history. We received a CBC from a 71 year old female with a 4 year history of untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia/ small lymphocytic lymphoma(CLL/SLL). The patient’s recent history included a myocardial infarction(MI) 5 months prior. The patient was found to have leukocytosis (WBC 25.38 x 103/μL) and absolute lymphocytosis (18.25 x 103/μL) with normal hemoglobin and hematocrit (Hgb 13.4 g/dL, Hct 40.8%) and normal platelet count (272 x 103/μL). The differential had 71.9% lymphocytes with many abnormal forms noted. The slide was sent for a pathology review. The pathologist reported “Atypical lymphocytosis consistent with patient’s known chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) Filament-like inclusions are present in the cytoplasm which has been previously reported in patients with CLL.”

Image 2. Lymphocytes with crystalline-like inclusions.

A curious tech can’t stop at just that description. If you tell me they are filament-like inclusions, I will have all kinds of questions. What are these filaments made of? Are they crystals, or something else? How common are these? Are these diagnostic of CLL? Are these only seen in CLL? What is their significance? And, of course, the most puzzling question, why have I never seen these before??

CLL is a form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and is the most common leukemia in the Western world. It is generally a leukemia of older age with a median age at diagnosis around 67-72. The disease is widely variable, with some patients asymptomatic and requiring no treatment for many years, while others have a more rapidly progressive course of disease requiring treatment. About 60% of patients are diagnosed before they exhibit any symptoms. CLL and SLL are considered to be different manifestations of the same disease. In CLL, the abnormal B lymphocytes are found mostly in the peripheral blood and bone marrow, but in SLL, there is lymph node involvement, with abnormal cells mostly found in the lymph nodes. CLL is diagnosed based on absolute B lymphocyte counts ≥5 x 109/L. Flow cytometry typically reveals a distinctive cell immunophenotype with expression of CD19, CD5, CD23, and Κ/λ; and weak expression of CD20, CD79b, and surface immunoglobulin.1

The most recent flow cytometry report on our patient was from one year ago. An 8 color analysis with CD45/SSC gating was performed by LabCorp. The flow revealed an abnormal cell population representing 56% of total cells. Two monoclonal B cell populations were detected with identical phenotypes except for light chain expression. These cells expressed CD45, CD19, CD20, CD22, CD5, and CD23., CD38-. This phenotype was consistent with her previous diagnosis of CLL/SLL.

A literature search revealed only a few articles about intracytoplasmic inclusions in CLL. Cytoplasmic inclusions in lymphomas are uncommon, but have been noted as vacuoles, crystals, and pseudocrystals. These crystalline inclusions represent immunoglobulin(Ig) heavy and light chain that precipitate in the cytoplasm. Using electron microscopy it has been found that theses Ig deposits localize in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER).5 When surface Ig can be demonstrated on the B lymphocytes, it has been found to be same as Ig in the inclusions.6

In two published studies that describe these crystal like inclusions, photographs are very similar to the ones we found on our patient.3,5 It is interesting to note that, in these two studies, neither of the subjects was a known CLL patient. The inclusions were noted in the patients’ cells and the peripheral blood was subsequently sent for flow. Phenotypes reported confirmed monoclonal B-cells representing a large percentage of cells. Huang reported monoclonal B-cells which expressed CD45, CD19, CD20, CD22, CD79b, CD5, CD23, CD148 and CD200(hi), with partial expression lambda, and negative for FMC7, CD10, CD11c, CD49d, CD103, CD38, CD25, CD160, IgM, CD81, kappa and Ki67.3 In the Ramlal case study, phenotype was CD5, CD19, CD20, CD23, positive, CD10, FMC7 negative.5 On the basis of flow, along with the CBC results, the patients were diagnosed with CLL.

Of course, while researching this, the little mouse in me kept asking questions and finding more questions to ask. One question that I still had questions about was if these inclusions have any prognostic value. In three recent studies3,5,6 it was indicated that these inclusions can be used to help with diagnosis, but are not prognostic for course of disease. Rodriguez followed a patient with asymptomatic Rai stage 0 CLL. This patient consistently had inclusions noted in lymphocytes for 9 years before any progression of disease was noted.6 In the medical field even if one study reports no prognostic significance, this opinion could change in the future with more studies. Could these crystalline inclusions be used to forecast time to first treatment (TFT) or overall survival?(OS). So far, because of the rarity of these cytoplasmic inclusions, there is no evidence of prognostic value. As well, the mechanism related to their formation and their role in CLL is yet to be determined.

Our case study patient and the various reports found in literature had common flow cytometry immunophenotypes. Patients were all either previously diagnosed with CLL or lymphocytic lymphoma, or were diagnosed at the time of the findings of these inclusions. While these crystalline inclusions alone are not considered diagnostic for CLL, their recognition can be used to assist in a prompt diagnosis of a lymphoproliferative disease. And they are so pretty! What medical laboratory scientist doesn’t love pretty cells? Be like that mouse. Be curious, keep your eyes open, and be on the lookout for these interesting cells in CLL patients, but, more importantly, in patients with lymphocytosis without a known diagnosis of a lymphoproliferative disorder.

References

  1. AJMC, January 7, 2019
  2. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: An Overview of Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Treatment
  3. Huang, Y., Zhang, L. Intracellular rod-like crystals in chronic lymphocyte leukemia. Int J Hematol 112, 267 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12185-020-02933-7
  4. Numeroff, Laura If You Give a Mouse a Cookie. 1986
  5. Ramlal, B, DiGiuseppe, JA. Intracytoplasmic crystalline inclusions in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Clin Case Rep. 2019; 7: 1460– 1461. https://doi.org/10.1002/ccr3.2250
  6. Cecilia M. Rodríguez, Carmen Stanganelli, Claudio Bussi, Daniela Arroyo, Darío Sastre, Viviana Heller, Pablo Iribarren & Irma Slavutsky (2018)Intracytoplasmic filamentous inclusions and IGHV rearrangements in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Leukemia & Lymphoma, 59:5,1239-1243, DOI: 10.1080/10428194.2017.1370549

-Becky Socha, MS, MLS(ASCP)CM BB CM graduated from Merrimack College in N. Andover, Massachusetts with a BS in Medical Technology and completed her MS in Clinical Laboratory Sciences at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell. She has worked as a Medical Technologist for over 30 years. She’s worked in all areas of the clinical laboratory, but has a special interest in Hematology and Blood Banking. When she’s not busy being a mad scientist, she can be found outside riding her bicycle.

The Utility of Flow Cytometry in Establishing the Correct Diagnosis of a Rare Aggressive Lymphoma

Case history

A 73 year old woman presented with shortness of breath and was found to have bilateral pleural effusions. She had a history of marginal zone B-Cell lymphoma involving the bone marrow, which was diagnosed 3 months before this presentation and was treated with Rituximab.

Thoracentesis revealed an atypical lymphoid population comprised of intermediate and large sized cells with eccentrically placed nuclei, multiple prominent nucleoli and scant to moderate amounts of basophilic cytoplasm (Image 1). Initial evaluation of the cytology material was concerning for large-cell transformation of the patient’s previously diagnosed marginal zone B cell lymphoma. A representative portion of the fine needle aspirate sample was sent for flow cytometric immunophenotyping.

Image 1. Cytology (Diff Quik, 400X). The atypical lymphoid population is comprised of intermediate and large sized cells with eccentrically placed nuclei, multiple prominent nucleoli and scant to moderate amounts of basophilic cytoplasm.

Flow cytometric immunophenotyping showed a distinct population of atypical cells with moderate CD45 expression and increased side scatter in keeping with cytoplasmic complexity (Figure 1, black arrows). On an initial screening B cell lymphoma panel these cells were negative for CD19 and positive for CD30 (partial), and CD44 (Figure 2).

Figure 1. The neoplastic population shows expression of CD30 and CD44.

The population of interest lacked expression of CD10, CD20, CD22 and surface immunoglobulin light chains and CD138 (Figure 2 and 3).

Figure 2. The neoplastic population lacks expression of CD10, CD19, CD20, and CD22.
Figure 3. The neoplastic population of cells are negative for surface immunoglobulin light chains and CD138.

CD30 expression prompted the investigation of additional T-cell markers to rule out a T cell lymphoma (Figure 4). This population showed dim expression of CD7 but was otherwise negative for pan T cell markers (CD2, CD3, CD5) as well as CD4 and CD8 (Figure 4).

Figure 4. The neoplastic population of cells are positive for CD7 (dim) and CD30 and negative for CD3, CD4, CD8, and CD26.

Given the unusual immunophenotype of the neoplasms, a diagnosis of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (transformation of the known marginal zone lymphoma) seemed less likely and other possibilities were considered.

The presence of CD30 expression and the plasmablastic morphologic features together with the clinical presentation with effusions raised the possibility of primary effusion lymphoma. IHC for anti-HHV8 was performed on the cell block sample (Image 2).

Image 2. Cytology (cell block 400X) A. Hematoxylin and eosin stain of the cell block reveals large, atypical lymphoid cells; Small and large atypical lymphoid cells are highlighted by CD30 (B), HHV8 (LANA-1) (C), and CD138 (focally) (D).

Final diagnosis  

Primary effusion lymphoma (HHV8 positive).

Discussion

Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a large B-cell neoplasm usually presenting as serous effusions without a detectable tumor mass [1]. It is universally associated with the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8). It usually occurs in the setting of immunodeficiency [2]. Some patients with PEL secondarily develop solid tumors in adjacent structures such as the pleura [3-5].

Immunophenotype of PEL:

POSITIVE: CD45, HLA-DR, CD30, CD38, VS38c, CD138, EMA, HHV8 (LANA1).

NEGATIVE: pan- B-cell markers (CD19, CD20, and CD79a), surface and cytoplasmic Ig, and BCL6.

PEL is usually negative for T/NK-cell antigens, although aberrant expression of T-cell markers may occur. PEL is usually positive for EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) by in situ hybridization but negative for EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) by IHC.  This could be explained by EBV virus latency. It is ability of a pathogenic virus to lie dormant (latent) within a cell, denoted as the lysogenic part of the viral life cycle. EBV expresses its genes in one of three patterns, known as latency programs. EBV can exhibit one of three latency programs: Latency I, Latency II, or Latency III. Each latency program leads to the production of a limited, distinct set of viral proteins and viral RNAs. The Epstein-Barr virus encoded RNAs (EBERs): EBER1 and EBER2 are expressed during all latency forms [6], whereas LMP1 is expressed only in latency 2 and 3 rendering it a less sensitive marker for detection of EBV infection. EBV-negative PEL is common in elderly, HIV-negative patients from HHV8-endemic regions (Mediterranean) [7].

Differential Diagnosis

Most common cavities involved by PEL: pleural, pericardial, and peritoneal [8-10].

It was thought that PEL can involve an artificial cavity related to the capsule of a breast implant [11] although it was described only in one case report without appropriate HHV8 staining and before recognition of breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL), which this case probably was presenting [12].

Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) Prognosis

The prognosis is very unfavorable. Median survival is < 6 months. Rare cases have been reported that responded to chemotherapy and/or immune modulation [13].

Flow Cytometry Utility

The importance of utility of flow cytometry in establishing a diagnosis of PEL has been previously shown by others [14]. In the series by Galan et al. the authors described a case of PEL in an 88-year-old HIV-negative female with right-sided pleural effusion without significant lymphadenopathies or other effusions. The cytological study of the pleural fluid revealed a dense proliferation of large plasmablastic cells. A six-color multiparametric flow cytometry immunophenotyping study revealed 45% of large in size and high cellular complexity cells positive for CD45 (dim), CD38, CD138, CD30 and HLA-DR; and negative for CD19, CD20, cytoplasmatic CD79a, surface and cytoplasmic light chains Kappa and Lambda, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD7, CD8, CD28, CD56, CD81, and CD117. In situ hybridization for EBV-encoded small RNA was negative and immunohistochemistry for Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (HHV8) confirmed the diagnosis of PEL. These results in addition to the current case highlight the utility of flow cytometry in the diagnosis of lymphomas involving body cavities.

In Summary

PEL is associated with a proliferation of large B-cells which are positive for HHV8, CD45 (dim), CD30, CD38, and CD138 and negative for lineage defining B cell markers (CD19, CD20, and CD79a). Although PEL is a very rare lymphoma, it is important to consider it in patients with pleural, pericardial, and peritoneal effusions by sending a sample for cytological examination and flow cytometric immunophenotyping. Due to the absence of a mass lesion, cytology and flow cytometry are essential for establishing the diagnosis of PEL.

References

  1. Said, J.a.C.E., Primary effusion lymphoma, in WHO Classification of Tumours of Haematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues (Revised 4th edition), C.E. Swerdlow SH, Harris NL, Jaffe ES, Pileri SA, Stein H, Thiele J, Editor. 2017: Lyion. p. 323–324.
  2. Song, J.Y. and E.S. Jaffe, HHV-8-positive but EBV-negative primary effusion lymphoma. Blood, 2013. 122(23): p. 3712.
  3. Dotti, G., et al., Primary effusion lymphoma after heart transplantation: a new entity associated with human herpesvirus-8. Leukemia, 1999. 13(5): p. 664-70.
  4. Jones, D., et al., Primary-effusion lymphoma and Kaposi’s sarcoma in a cardiac-transplant recipient. N Engl J Med, 1998. 339(7): p. 444-9.
  5. Luppi, M., et al., Molecular evidence of organ-related transmission of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus or human herpesvirus-8 in transplant patients. Blood, 2000. 96(9): p. 3279-81.
  6. Khan, G., et al., Epstein Barr virus (EBV) encoded small RNAs: targets for detection by in situ hybridisation with oligonucleotide probes. J Clin Pathol, 1992. 45(7): p. 616-20.
  7. Dupin, N., et al., Distribution of human herpesvirus-8 latently infected cells in Kaposi’s sarcoma, multicentric Castleman’s disease, and primary effusion lymphoma. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 1999. 96(8): p. 4546-51.
  8. Otsuki, T., et al., Detection of HHV-8/KSHV DNA sequences in AIDS-associated extranodal lymphoid malignancies. Leukemia, 1996. 10(8): p. 1358-62.
  9. DePond, W., et al., Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and human herpesvirus 8 (KSHV/HHV8)-associated lymphoma of the bowel. Report of two cases in HIV-positive men with secondary effusion lymphomas. Am J Surg Pathol, 1997. 21(6): p. 719-24.
  10. Beaty, M.W., et al., A biophenotypic human herpesvirus 8–associated primary bowel lymphoma. Am J Surg Pathol, 1999. 23(8): p. 992-4.
  11. Said, J.W., et al., Primary effusion lymphoma in women: report of two cases of Kaposi’s sarcoma herpes virus-associated effusion-based lymphoma in human immunodeficiency virus-negative women. Blood, 1996. 88(8): p. 3124-8.
  12. Lyapichev, K.A., et al., Reconsideration of the first recognition of breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma: A critical review of the literature. Ann Diagn Pathol, 2020. 45: p. 151474.
  13. Ghosh, S.K., et al., Potentiation of TRAIL-induced apoptosis in primary effusion lymphoma through azidothymidine-mediated inhibition of NF-kappa B. Blood, 2003. 101(6): p. 2321-7.
  14. Galan, J., et al., The utility of multiparametric flow cytometry in the detection of primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). Cytometry B Clin Cytom, 2019. 96(5): p. 375-378.

This case was previously presented by authors as eCSI Case on International Clinical Cytometry Society website.  For more information please follow: https://www.cytometry.org/public/newsletters/eICCS-10-1/article7.php

-Dr. Loghavi is an Assistant Professor of hematopathology and molecular pathology MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX. She received her MD degree from the Azad University in Tehran, Iran. Shen then completed an Anatomic and Clinical Pathology residency training at Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, CA, followed by Surgical pathology, Hematopathology and Molecular pathology fellowship training at the University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Loghavi is passionate about medical education. Her clinical and research interests are focused on hematologic malignancies, with particular focus on myeloid neoplasm and the applications of flow cytometric immunophenotyping and molecular methods in detection of minimal/measurable residual disease. She has authored 100 peer-reviewed articles, 5 book chapters, and numerous abstracts in the fields of hematopathology and molecular pathology. 

-Kirill Lyapichev, MD, FASCP, is a board-certified anatomical and clinical pathologist who completed 2 years of hematopathology fellowship at MD Anderson Cancer Center. He is currently a molecular genetic pathology fellow at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Additionally, he is interested and involved in other research projects including neoplastic as well as non-neoplastic entities: MALT lymphoma, Castleman Disease, Kikuchi-Fujimoto Disease, and others. In 2020 he was selected as one of ASCP’s 2020 Top 40 Under Forty. Follow him on Twitter: @KirillLyapichev.

The Story of the Mott Cell, COVID-19 and the Cute Little Mouse

I have worked in hematology for many years, and there are certain things that never fail to excite technologists. Working in New Hampshire, it was always exciting to sickle cells or malaria, something common to some, but not common in our patient population. I now work in Baltimore, and see sickle cells nearly every day, and we come across malaria not too infrequently, but we still share good examples and save them for training. When we see something different or unusual, we always share the finding. Cells may need to be sent to the pathologists for a pathology review, and we always check back to see the pathologist’s identification and comments. Medical Technologists by nature are a curious bunch, and we always want to see ‘cool’ things. I wrote a blog two years ago about the only patient I have ever seen with Trypanosoma (Hematology Case Study: The Race to Save a 48 Year Old Man from a Rare Disease). Last month I wrote about Blue-green cytoplasmic inclusions (COVID-19 Patients with “Green Crystals of …” STOP! Please Don’t Call Them That). So, when I saw something else ‘cool’ and different on a peripheral smear, and then saw it AGAIN, on another patient, and saw other techs here in the US and in other countries were also mentioning these, because it’s my nature, I got curious.

When I write these blogs, I often feel a little bit like the mouse in the children’s story “If You Give a Mouse a Cookie”, by Laura Joffe Numeroff. It’s about an adorable little mouse who asks for a cookie, and then decides he needs a glass of milk to go with it, and then he needs a straw, and it goes on and on, in a circle, back to the beginning. Maybe it’s that the mouse is a little ADD, but I like to believe that he’s just creative and curious. I start with an idea, and often go off on many tangents before a blog is finished and comes back to where I started.. When I started writing this, it was because I saw an interesting cell, and I started exploring, and found that others had seen them, too. Then I started looking through my textbooks for references and information, and searched for recent research or studies, and then I wanted to find out more… just like that mouse.

There are some things that we learn about in school and we may see on CAP surveys, but no matter where you work, they are still rarely seen, so are a novelty. Mott cells are one of these things. I have a collection of Hematology texts from grad school and years of teaching Hematology. Several of these don’t even mention Mott cells, but, when they do, it’s barely a sentence in a discussion of plasma cells. I happen to have a very old copy of Abbott Laboratories “The Morphology of Human Blood Cells” . The one with the red cover, from 1975. The term Mott cell does not appear in this manual, but they do show pictures and describe “Plasma cells with globular bodies (Grape, Berry or Morula cells)”, and describe these globules as “Russell bodies”.1 So some of us who have been working in the field for many years may remember Russell bodies and Morula cells, or Grape cells, even if the term Mott cell is not familiar. Regardless of what we or textbooks call them, they tend to trigger a memory because the images are so unique.

So, again, I’m a bit like that mouse and getting distracted with the background. Why am I writing this blog? In recent months I have seen cells identified as plasmacytoid lymphocytes and Mott cells in several hospitalized patients. I have heard reports of these cells in other facilities as well. So, like a good medical technologist, I got curious about Mott cells. What are they, and what is their significance? And why are we seeing more of these now?

Mott Cells are named after surgeon F.W. Mott. In the 1890’s, William Russell first observed these cells with grape like globular inclusions, but did not recognize what the inclusions were or their significance. Russell examined the cytoplasmic globular inclusions and assumed that these cells were fungi. Ten years later, Mott described cells he called morular cells. He recognized that these cells were plasma cells and the inclusions were indicative of chronic inflammation. Thus, today we refer to these cells as Mott cells, morular cells or grape cells, and the inclusions as Russell bodies.2

Hematology texts describe Mott cells as morphologic variations of plasma cells packed with globules called Russell bodies. We know that plasma cells produce immunoglobulin. When the plasma cells produce excessive amounts of immunoglobulin, and there is defective immunoglobulin secretion, it accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum and golgi complex of the cells, forming Russell bodies. Russell bodies are eosinophilic, but in the staining process the globulin may dissolve and they therefore appear to be clear vacuoles in the cell under the microscope. Thus, a plasma cell with cytoplasm packed with these Ig inclusions is called a Mott cell.

Mott recognized that these atypical plasma cells were present in inflammation. Plasma cells are not typically seen on peripheral blood smears and constitute less than 4% of the cells in a normal bone marrow. Yet, on occasion, we can see plasma cells, including Mott cells, on peripheral blood smears in both malignant and non-malignant conditions. Mott cells are associated with stress conditions occurring in a number of conditions including chronic inflammation, autoimmune diseases, lymphomas, multiple myeloma, and Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome.3

So, why are we seeing an increased mention of Mott cells now? We seem to be seeing these on patients testing positive for SARS-CoV-2. I have seen cells on patients at my facility that resemble Mott cells. I belong to a Hematology Interest group and over the past few months I have seen several people post pictures of Mott cells, cells with Russell bodies, and plasmacytoid lymphocytes identified on peripheral blood smears of COVID-19 patients. Other techs chimed in with comments that they have also seen these cells recently. I have even seen a comment propose that these cells are indicative of COVID-19 infection.

SARS-CoV-2 definitely causes inflammatory processes and stress conditions in the body, so it makes sense that we may see these cells in COVID-19 positive patients.

Figure 1 shows a Mott cell on an image from Parkland Medical Center Laboratory, Derry, NH. A Mott cell was identified by pathologist in a male patient who tested negative for COVID-19 at the time the sample was drawn, and subsequently tested positive. Mariana Garza, a Medical Technologist working at Las Palmas Medical Center in El Paso, TX shared a case of a 59 year old diabetic male, diagnosed with COVID-19. The patient’s WBC was 31 x 103/μL. Two Mott cells were identified by pathologist on his differential. So, the curious little mouse in me researched some more.

Image 1. Mott cell. Photo courtesy Parkland Medical Center, Laboratory, Derry, NH.

Several published research papers have studied morphologic changes in peripheral blood cells in COVID-19 patients. As we now know, SARS-CoV-2 affects many organs including the hematopoietic and immune systems. A study in Germany showed that COVID-19 patients exhibited abnormalities in all cell lines; white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets. Increased WBC counts were seen in 41% of samples in their study. Differentials performed on study patients showed lymphocytopenia in 83%, and monocytopenia in 88%. Red blood cell morphology changes were noted. Platelet counts ranged from thrombocytopenia to thrombocytosis, but giant platelets were noted across the board.4

Mott cells are indicative of chronic inflammation and may have significance in association with COVID-1. In the above mentioned study, aberrant lymphocytes were noted in 81% of patients who were SARS-CoV-2 positive, and observable in 86% of the same patients after they tested negative. The paper shows plasmacytoid lymphocytes and Mott cells amongst these aberrant lymphocytes. Moreover, morphologic changes in neutrophils, such as a left shift and pseudo‐Pelger‐Huët anomaly, decreased after virus elimination but changes in lymphocytes, indicators of chronic infection, remained.4

Another study also reported reactive or plasmacytoid lymphocytes and Mott cells observed in peripheral blood.4,5 Researchers at Northwick Park Hospital, UK, presented a case study of a 59 year old male with COVID-19 with a normal WBC and thrombocytosis. His differential revealed lymphocytopenia. His differential also showed lymphoplasmacytoid lymphocytes and Mott cells. In their conclusions it is stated that “In our experience, the lymphocyte features illustrated above are common in blood films of patients presenting to hospital with clinically significant Covid‐19. The observation of plasmacytoid lymphocytes supports a provisional clinical diagnosis of this condition.”5

Can these variant plasma cells, along with other commonly seen morphological changes, be used as part of a diagnostic algorithm for SARS-Cov-2 infection? As we see more COVID-19 patients there will be more, larger studies done and more Mott cells identified. Some disorders, such as Epstein Barr Virus and Dengue Fever are characterized by distinct viral changes in cells. However, since Mott cells can be seen in many conditions, these alone could not be considered diagnostic, but the indications are that these cells, along with the entire differential and morphological patterns, could prove to be a straightforward and easy to perform supplementary diagnostic tool. More, larger studies need to be done. It was concluded in the German study, that this pattern of morphologic changes in cells could be further investigated and validated with a larger blinded study, and that this information could lead to the development of a morphologic COVID‐19 scoring system.4 In the meantime, keep an eye out for Mott cells. These should not be ignored and should be in some way noted because they may be of future diagnostic use. That’s all or now, folks! Something to dig deeper into in another blog! The mouse strikes again!

Many thanks to Nikki O’Donnell, MLT, Parkland Medical Center, Derry, NH and Mariana Garza, MT, Las Palmas Medical Center in El Paso, TX for sharing their case studies and photos.

Becky Socha MS, MLS(ASCP)CMBB

References

  1. Diggs, LAW, Sturm, D, Bell,A. The Morphology of Human Blood Cells, Third edition. Abbott Laboratories. 1975.
  2. ManasaRavath CJ, Noopur Kulkarni, et al. Mott cells- at a glance. International Journal of Contemporary Mudeical Research 2017;4(1):43-44.
  3. Bavle RM. Bizzare plasma cell – mott cell. J Oral Maxillofac Pathol. 2013;17(1):2-3.doi: 10.4103/0973-029X.110682.
  4. Luke, F, Orso, E, et al. Coronavirus disease 2019 induces multi‐lineage, morphologic changes in peripheral blood cells:eJHaem. 2020;1–8.
  5. Foldes D, Hinton R, Arami S, Bain BJ. Plasmacytoid lymphocytes in SARS-CoV-2 infection (Covid-19). Am J Hematol. 2020;1–2. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajh.
  6. Numeroff, Laura. If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, 1985.

-Becky Socha, MS, MLS(ASCP)CM BB CM graduated from Merrimack College in N. Andover, Massachusetts with a BS in Medical Technology and completed her MS in Clinical Laboratory Sciences at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell. She has worked as a Medical Technologist for over 30 years. She’s worked in all areas of the clinical laboratory, but has a special interest in Hematology and Blood Banking. When she’s not busy being a mad scientist, she can be found outside riding her bicycle.

COVID-19 Patients with “Green Crystals of …” STOP! Please Don’t Call Them That

Blue-green cytoplasmic inclusions in neutrophils and monocytes are a novelty in hematology. It is rare to see these inclusions on peripheral smears, and when we do, there is excitement, but sadness too, because, when noted, they usually indicate a poor prognosis and impending death. Thus, we have heard them called “green crystals of death” or “death crystals.” I know I would not want to read a family member’s medical chart and see reference to “death crystals.” It’s an insensitive term, and one the medical community is trying to discourage. And, in fact, though it typically does indicate a poor prognosis, not all cases lead to death. In published reports, it has been shown that short term mortality in patients with these crystals is about 60%.1

These rare inclusions are refractile and irregular in shape, and are found in neutrophils, and occasionally in monocytes. Color seems to be subjective here. They call them green when inclusions in photos or cells I am looking at look very blue to me. The color perceived may depend on the type of stain (Giemsa, Wright or Wright-Giemsa) used and how fancy we get in color names and descriptions. Or, maybe I’m just color blind! Some people (like my husband) are “lumpers” and call anything blue-green, blue, or green, but don’t recognize subtleties of colors. Thus, I guess to make everyone happy, or to compromise, the blue-green description may fit them best.

Image 1. Blue-green inclusions seen in neutrophils. Photos courtesy of Alana D. Swanson. UMMC

These blue-green inclusions were originally reported in patients with hepatic injury and failure. Laboratory results include elevations in AST, ALT and LDH. More recently, there have been cases with no evidence of hepatic injury. Researchers are now finding that these crystals can occur in patients with tissue injury other than liver, and in patients with multiorgan failure. In patients with no liver injury, what is a common factor is that LDH is elevated, indicating tissue injury. Additionally, along with these crystals, lactic acid levels can be used as a predictor of survival. Higher levels of lactic acidosis at the time crystals are noted is a negative predictor of survival.2

In trying to determine the clinical significance of these crystals, they have been subject to a number of different stains to determine their content. The association with hepatic failure led researchers to hypothesize that the crystals were a bile product in circulation. Since then, the crystals have been found to be negative in bile stains. When stained with other stains, Oil Red O showed positive in neutrophils, indicating high lipid content. The inclusions did not stain positive with iron stain or myeloperoxidase. Acid fast stains showed the inclusions to be acid fast positive.3 These crystals also show an interesting similarity to sea-blue histiocytes, which further associates them with tissue injury. After analysis, it is now thought that these crystals contain lipofuscin-like deposits representing lysosomal degradation products, and may be present in multiple types of tissue injury.2

With the current pandemic, I have seen reports of these crystals in COVID-19 patients. I have heard of fellow technologists seeing these, and a recent paper described the first reported cases in patients with COVID-19. These recent incidences may lead to new information about exactly what clinical significance they hold. About one third of COVID-19 patients have elevated ALT and AST, though it is not yet clear whether the liver dysfunction is directly caused by the virus, due to sepsis, or other complications of patient comorbidities. Many COVID-19 patients have mild disease, yet some develop severe pneumonia, respiratory complications, and multiorgan failure. Mortality is increased in these severely affected patients. To better understand and manage treatment for COVID-19, physicians seek to identify biological indicators associated with adverse outcomes.1

In a New York City study, Cantu and colleagues reported on six COVID-19 patients who presented with blue-green crystals in neutrophils and/or monocytes. All six patients had an initial lymphocytopenia, and significantly elevated AST, ALT, LDH and lactic acid at the time the crystals were noted. All of the patients had comorbidities, yet only two of the six presented with acute liver disease. Interestingly, in the six cases reported on in the study, only one had blue-green inclusions reported from the original manual differential. The others were found retrospectively when correlating the cases with patients known to have elevated ALT and AST. All patients died within 20 days of initial diagnosis.1

The consensus of several papers in the last few years is that these crystals are being underreported. As seen in the above study, the crystals were originally seen in just one of the six patients. A look back revealed the other cases. With an increase in COVID-19 cases in our facilities, these blue-green crystal inclusions may be a novelty that is wearing off. We may see a rise in their presence, and need to be able to recognize and report them. This information is important to report if clinicians are to use these crystal inclusions along with acute transaminase and lactic acid elevations to predict poor patient outcomes.

Clinicians, hematologists, and laboratory technologists should be educated and have a high level of awareness of these inclusions. The University of Rochester conducted a study a few years ago that noted that, because these crystals are rare, techs may not be on the lookout for them. Once techs see them, they seem to be on the alert and more are reported. The hospital instituted an “increased awareness” campaign, which resulted in an increase in detection. This revealed cases that were not related to liver injury, including patients with metastatic cancer and sepsis. However, an important correlating factor was that all of the patients had mild to severe elevations in liver enzymes. With more awareness, we are starting to see them in patients without hepatic injury, but with other inflammation and tissue injury.4

Image 2. Blue- green crystal inclusions seen in a patient diagnosed with sepsis and multiorgan failure. Photo courtesy of Karen Cable, YRMC.

Let’s raise our level of awareness of these maybe-not-so-rare crystal inclusions. And, please be sure to call them by their preferred name, blue-green neutrophil inclusions! Let’s not talk about death crystals or crystals of death.

Many thanks to my colleague Alana D. Swanson, MLS(ASCP)CM , University of Maryland Medical Center and Karen Cable, Hematology Section Lead, Yavapai Regional Medical Center, Arizona, for the photos used in this blog. 

References

  1. Cantu, M, Towne, W, Emmons, F et al. Clinical Significance of blue-green neutrophil and monocyte cytoplasmic inclusions in SARS-CoV-2 positive critically ill patients. Br J Haematol. May 26, 2020.
  2. Hodgkins, SR, Jones, J. A Case of Blue-Green neutrophil inclusions. ASCLS Today. 2019;32:431.
  3. Hodgson, T.O., Ruskova, A., Shugg, C.J., McCallum, V.J. and Morison, I.M. Green neutrophil and monocyte inclusions – time to acknowledge and report. Br J Haematol, 2015;170: 229-235.
  4. Patel,N, Hoffman,CM, Goldman,BJ et al. Green Inclusions in Neutrophils and Monocytes are an Indicator of Acute Liver Injury and High Mortality. Acta Haematol. 2017;138:85-90

-Becky Socha, MS, MLS(ASCP)CM BB CM graduated from Merrimack College in N. Andover, Massachusetts with a BS in Medical Technology and completed her MS in Clinical Laboratory Sciences at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell. She has worked as a Medical Technologist for over 30 years. She’s worked in all areas of the clinical laboratory, but has a special interest in Hematology and Blood Banking. When she’s not busy being a mad scientist, she can be found outside riding her bicycle.

Hematopathology and Molecular Diagnostics Case Study: A 63 Year Old Man with Fatigue

The following case is an interesting overlap of Hematopathology and Molecular Diagnostics, and shows the utility of sequencing to detect a cancer before biopsy could.

A 63 year old gentleman presented to a heme/onc physician with six months of intractable anasarca, fatigue, and a recent mild thrombocytopenia (Table 1). They were otherwise in healthy condition. The physician initiated a lymphoma work-up that included a bone marrow biopsy. The tests were negative for M-protein.

Table 1. Summary of symptoms and relevant abnormal labs.

The bone marrow biopsy was somewhat limited, but the core contained multiple marrow elements. After a thorough review by a Hematopathologist, no evidence of dysplasia or other irregularities could be detected (Image 1). Flow cytometry detected no aberrant blast population. Cytogenetics detected 20del [16/20] and 5del [3/20]. These findings did not clearly indicate a specific diagnosis.

Image 1. 40x view of the bone marrow specimen at the initial presentation. No evidence of dysplasia was found.

As the clinical suspicion for a malignancy was high, the bone marrow specimen was sent for sequencing on a 1385-gene panel test. The test included tumor-normal matched DNA sequencing (“tumor” sample: bone marrow, normal: saliva), RNA whole transcriptome sequencing on the bone marrow, and Copy Number Variant (CNV) analysis. Tumor-normal matched sequencing helps rule out variants that are normal and present in the patient.

Somatic mutations were determined as those that were present in the “tumor” sample and not in the matched normal sample. The somatic variants found are listed below with their variant allele frequency (VAF) in parenthesis. Recall that a VAF of 40% means that a mutation is present in the heterozygous state in 80% of cells.

  • IDH2 (p.R140Q, 46%)
  • SRSF2 (p.P95T, 51%)
  • CBL (p.R499*, 47%)
  • KRAS (p.K117N, 12%)
Figure 1. View of IGV, which displays the NGS reads for IDH1 along with the variant allele highlighted in red. The color of the bars indicates the direction of the reads (forward in red and reverse in blue). This reflects the allele frequency of approximately 50%.

The mutations in these genes are commonly found in myeloid cancers including myselodysplastic syndrome. Activating mutation in IDH2 (isocitrate dehydrogenase 2) increase the production of the oncometabolite 2-HG, which alters methylation in cells taking them to an undiffereitiated state. SRSF2 (Serine And Arginine Rich Splicing Factor 2) is a part of the spliceosome complex, which regulates how sister chromatids separate from each other. Failures in the proper function of the complex creates genomic instability. CBL (Casitas B-lineage Lymphoma) is a negative regulator of multiple signaling pathways, and loss of function mutations (as seen here) lead to increased growth signals through several tyrosine kinase receptors. KRAS (Kirsten RAt Sarcoma virus) is an upstream mediator of the RAS pathway, which acquires mutations that lead to constitutive activation and sends growth signals to cells causing them to proliferate.

Furthermore the CNV analysis also found the heterozygous loss of chromosome 20 as reported in cytogenetics. CNV analysis did not detect chromosome 5 deletion, as it was below the limit of detection (20% for CNV analysis).

Figure 2. This plot shows the normalized read frequency of genes across each of the chromosomes is shown here. The drop at chromosome 20 is shown in a pale brown color on the right side of the graph. This is consistent with the cytogenetic findings. The loss of 5q isn’t seen as it is below the limit of detection of 30%.

These mutations are all individually common in MDS, but the co-occurance of each gives very strong evidence that MDS is the diagnosis (Figure 3). There have also been studies that provide prognostic implications for several of the genetic mutations present. Some mutations like SRSF2 or CBL at high VAF (>10%) indicate a poor prognosis, but mutations in IDH2 or TP53 at any frequency have not only a high chance of progression, but also a faster time to onset of disease. Another non-genetic risk factor for developing MDS is an elevated RDW, which we saw in our patient.

Figure 3. From Becker et al 2016.

All of these high-risk factors together led us to push for a diagnosis of MDS based off of molecular findings, and the patient was started on treatment with Azacitadine. Our assessment was confirmed 3 months later when, the patient’s follow up bone marrow biopsy showed significant progression with megakaryocytic and erythroid dysplasia and hyperplasia and reticulin fibrosis MF2 (Image 2). Aberrant blasts were detected (1-2%), but not elevated. This demonstrates how molecular findings predicted and predated the patient’s rapid progression to morphologic disease.

Image 2. Dysplastic, hyperplastic megakaryocytes and erythroid lineage.

In summary, multiple molecular mutations indicative of MDS were found in a symptomatic patient’s unremarkable bone marrow biopsy months before a rapid progression to MDS.

References

  1. Steensma DP, Bejar R, Jaiswal S et al. Blood 2015;126(1):9-16.
  2. Sellar RS, Jaiswal S, and Ebert BL. Predicting progression to AML. Nature Medicine 2018; 24:904-6.
  3. Abelson S, Collord G et al. Prediction of acute myeloid leukemia risk in healthy individuals. Nature 2018; 559:400-404.
  4. Desai P, Mencia-Trinchant N, Savenkov O et al. Nature Medicine 2018; 24:1015-23.
  5. Becker PM. Clonal Hematopoiesis: The Seeds of Leukemia or Innocuous Bystander? Blood.2016 13(1)

-Jeff SoRelle, MD is a Chief Resident of Pathology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, TX. His clinical research interests include understanding how the lab intersects with transgender healthcare and improving genetic variant interpretation.

A 66 Year Old Male with Diarrhea, Weight Loss, and Night Sweats

Case History

A 66 year old man with past medical history of recently diagnosed Clostridioides difficile colitis presented to emergency department with diarrhea, weight loss of 52 pounds in 4 months, and occasional night sweats. CT imaging revealed dilation of small bowel with thickened mucosal folds. The duodenum was subsequently biopsied to reveal diffuse intestinal lymphangiectasia containing PAS positive and Congo red negative eosinophilic material and lamina propria foamy macrophages. Laboratory investigations revealed normocytic anemia, proteinuria, and peripheral IgM kappa monoclonal gammopathy.

Biopsy Findings

Image 1. Aspirate.
Image 2. Core biopsy.
Image 3. CD138.
Image 4. Kappa ISH.
Image 5. Lambda ISH.

Bone marrow aspirate shows increased plasma cells and mast cells. H&E stained sections demonstrate a normocellular bone marrow with trilineage hematopoiesis and involvement by 35% plasma cells. By immunohistochemistry, CD138 highlights clusters of plasma cells that predominantly express kappa light chain restriction.

FISH and Mutation Analysis

FISH demonstrated loss of chromosome 11 and gain of chromosome 15, which was consistent with plasma cell dyscrasia. MYD88 mutation analysis did not detect the mutation.

Diagnosis

The findings of the patient’s normocytic anemia, IgM monoclonal gammopathy, and intestinal lymphangectasia with an associated plasma cell dyscrasia involving the bone marrow favor a lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

Discussion

Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM) is a malignant B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the bone marrow and peripheral IgM monoclonal gammopathy.1 It is rare with an overall incidence of 3 per million persons per year, accounting for 1-2% of hematologic cancers.1 It occurs predominantly in Caucasian males, with a median age of 63-68 years old at diagnosis.1-3

Patient may be asymptomatic for years and require observation or experience a broad spectrum of signs and symptoms. These symptoms may be attributable to the tumor infiltration of the bone marrow and lymphoid tissues, IgM circulating in the blood, and IgM depositing into tissues. The most common clinical presentation of WM is fatigue and nonspecific constitutional symptoms, such as fever, night sweats, and weight loss, due to normochromic, normocytic anemia. 20-30% of patients may exhibit lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly due to infiltration of peripheral tissues. High concentration of IgM in the circulation may lead to hyperviscosity, resulting in oronasal bleeding, gingival bleeding, blurred vision due to retinal hemorrhages, and neurological symptoms, including headache, ataxia, light-headedness, dizziness, and rarely, stroke.2-3 The gastrointestinal manifestations are rare; however, IgM monoclonal protein may deposit into the lamina propria of the GI tract, causing diarrhea, steatorrhea, and GI bleeding.4 Other IgM-related manifestations include cold agglutinin hemolytic anemia, cryoglobulin, and amyloid deposition in tissues.3

Diagnosis of WM includes evidence of IgM monoclonal gammopathy and at least 10% of bone marrow infiltration by lymphoplasmacytic cells.5 Monoclonal gammopathy can be detected by the monoclonal spike, or M-spike, on serum protein electrophoresis.3 Serum immunofixation may be performed to identify the type of monoclonal protein and the type of light chain involved.3 In terms of immunophenotype, neoplastic cells express surface IgM, cytoplasmic Igs, CD38, CD79a, and pan B-cell markers (CD19, CD20, and CD22). CD10 and CD23 are absent. Expression of CD5 occurs in approximately 5-20% of cases.6 Recent studies have reported two most common somatic mutations in WM, which are MYD88 L265P mutations (90-95% of cases) and CXCR4 (30–40% of cases).7 Absence of these mutations, however, do not completely exclude the diagnosis of WM.

The International Staging System for WM identifies five factors associated with adverse prognosis, including age older than 65, hemoglobin < 11.5g/dL, platelet count < 100K/μL, beta-2-microglobulin > 3mg/L, and monoclonal IgM concentration > 7g/L.3 Patients younger than the age of 65 years with 0 or 1 of these factors are in the low-risk category with a median survival of 12 years.3 In contrast, patients with 2 or more risk factors are in the intermediate- and high-risk categories and have a median survival of almost 4 years. 3

Management of WM depends on the patient’s clinical manifestations.Furthermore, patients with minimal symptoms should be managed with rituximab, whereas patients with severe symptoms related to WM should receive more aggressive treatment, including dexamethasone, rituximab and cyclophosphamide. Hyperviscosity syndrome is an oncologic emergency that requires removal of excess IgM from the circulation via plasmapheresis.8

References

  1. Neparidze N, Dhodapkar MV. Waldenstrom’s Macroglobulinemia: Recent advances in biology and therapy. Clin Adv Hematol Onco. 2009 Oct;7(10): 677-690.
  2. Leleu X, Roccaro AM, Moreau AS, Dupire S, Robu D, et al. Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia. Cancer Lett. 2008 Oct;270(1):095-107.
  3. Tran T. Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia: a review of laboratory findings and clinical aspects. Laboratory Medicine. 2013 May;44(2):e19-e21.
  4. Kantamaneni V, Gurram K, Khehra R, Koneru G, Kulkarni A. Distal illeal ulcers as gastrointestinal manifestation of Waldenstrom Macroglbulinemia. 2019 Apr; 6(4):pe00058.
  5. Grunenberg A, Buske C. Monoclonal IgM gammopathy and Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia. Dtsch Arztebl Int. 2017 Nov;114(44):745-751.
  6. Bhawna S, Butola KS, Kumar Y. A diagnostic dilemma: Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia/plasma cell leukemia. Case Rep Pathol. 2012;2012:271407.
  7. Varettoni M, Zibellini S, Defrancesco I, Ferretti VV, Rizzo E, et all. Pattern of somatic mutations in patients with Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia or IgM monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.
  8. Oza A, Rajkumar SV. Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia: prognosis and management. Blood Cancer Journal. 2015;5:e394.

-Jasmine Saleh, MD MPH is a pathology resident at Loyola University Medical Center with an interest in dermatopathology and hematopathology. Follow Dr. Saleh on Twitter @JasmineSaleh.

–Kamran M. Mirza, MD, PhD, MLS(ASCP)CM is an Assistant Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical Education and Applied Health Sciences at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine and Parkinson School for Health Sciences and Public Health. A past top 5 honoree in ASCP’s Forty Under 40, Dr. Mirza was named to The Pathologist’s Power List of 2018 and placed #5 in the #PathPower List 2019. Follow him on twitter @kmirza.

Hematopathology Case Study: An 80 Year Old Man with Rapid Onset Cervical Adenopathy

Case History

An 80 year old man presented with rapid onset of cervical adenopathy over a period of few months. The largest lymph node measuring 6 cm was biopsied and sent for histopathological evaluation.

Biopsy Findings

Sections from the lymph node showed effacement of the lymph node architecture by a fairly monotonous population of medium to large sized lymphoid cells arranged in vague nodular pattern. Focally, a starry sky pattern was observed. The cells were 1.5-2 times the size of an RBC, with high N:C ratio, irregular angulated nuclei and small nucleoli. A high mitotic rate of 2-3 mitoses/hpf was seen.

Immunohistochemistry

Immunohistochemical stains showed that the lymphoma cells were positive for CD20, CD5, SOX-11, and negative for Cyclin D1, CD10, CD23, CD30, BCL-1, and BCL-6. Ki67 index was about 70%.

Diagnosis

A diagnosis of Mantle cell lymphoma, pleomorphic variant was made.

Discussion

Mantle cell lymphoma is a peripheral B cell lymphoma, occurring in middle aged or older adults, with a male: female ratio of 7:1. Although Cyclin D1 expression is considered a hallmark of mantle cell lymphoma, yet about 7% cases are known to be Cyclin D1 negative. In these cases, morphological features and SOX-11 positivity helps in establishing a definitive diagnosis.

Differential Diagnosis

In the assessment of morphological features of lymphoma, the cell size is an important starting point. In this case, the lymphoma cells ranged from medium to large sized. The following differential diagnoses were considered:

  • Burkitt lymphoma

This case showed a “starry sky” pattern focally. A medium sized population of cells, high mitotic rate and a high Ki67 index (70%) favoured a Burkitt lymphoma. However, although commonly seen in Burkitt lymphoma, a “starry sky” pattern is not specific for this type of lymphoma. Also, the lack of typical “squaring off” of nuclei, basophilic cytoplasmic rim were against the diagnosis of Burkitt lymphoma. The nuclei in this case showed 0-1 small nucleoli, unlike the typical basophilic 2-3 prominent nucleoli of Burkitt lymphoma. Moreover, Ki67 index, even though high was not enough for Burkitt lymphoma where it approaches 100%. The cells were negative for CD10 and Bcl-6, which are almost always found in a Burkitt lymphoma. Hence, a diagnosis of Burkitt lymphoma was ruled out.

  • Diffuse Large B cell Lymphoma

The presence of interspersed large cells with nucleoli, irregular nuclei, high mitotic rate, and a high Ki67 index with a history of very rapid enlargement of lymph node suggested a diagnosis of Diffuse Large B cell lymphoma. However, the scant cytoplasm, lack of bizarre cells, and absence of CD10, BCl-2, BCl-6 were against a diagnosis of DLBCL.

  • Lymphoblastic lymphoma

A diagnosis of lymphoblastic lymphoma was favoured by the irregularly angulated nuclei, and presence of nucleoli. However, the cells of lymphoblastic lymphoma have a more delicate nuclear chromatin, higher mitotic rate as against the relatively condensed chromatin and the low to high variable mitotic rate of Mantle cell lymphoma. Also, lymphoblastic lymphomas are more commonly of the T cell subtype and occur commonly in younger individuals. In this case, B cell markers were positive (CD 20), and the patient was 80 year old, disfavouring a lymphoblastic lymphoma. The blastoid variant of mantle cell lymphoma is practically indistinguishable from lymphoblastic lymphoma, except that it is Tdt negative.

Cyclin D1 negativity in Mantle cell lymphoma

In the cases of Cyclin D1 negative mantle cell lymphomas, morphology plays a critical role in coming to a diagnosis of mantle cell lymphomas. In this case, points that favoured the diagnosis of mantle cell lymphoma were clinical features such as older age (80 years), and male gender, and morphological features such as a vaguely nodular pattern of growth, irregular nuclei, and 0-1 small nucleoli. Due to the presence of variably sized cells with distinct nucleoli, a pleomorphic variant was considered. Even though Cyclin D1 was found to be negative, the cells were positive for SOX-11.

SOX-11 is a transcription factor that is not normally expressed in B cells, but is sensitive and fairly specific for mantle cell lymphomas. It is important to note that SOX-11 is also positive in 25% Burkitt lymphoma, 100% lymphoblastic lymphoma, and 66% T-prolymphocytic leukemia. Herein lies the importance of recognising morphological features, as all of these lymphomas that may express SOX-11 were ruled on the basis of morphology. A more specific antibody, MRQ-58 may be used for greater specificity. The presence of SOX-11 is considered a specific biomarker for Cyclin-D1 negative mantle cell lymphomas. In these cases, there is upregulation of Cyclin D2 or D3 that may substitute for Cyclin D1 upregulation. But, immunohistochemical detection of Cyclin D2 or D3 is not helpful for establishing a diagnosis, as other lymphomas are commonly positive for these markers. Hence, it is important to perform SOX-11 immunohistochemistry to diagnose the Cyclin D1 negative variant of mantle cell lymphoma.

SOX-11 can be used not just for the diagnosis, but also for determining prognosis of mantle cell lymphoma. Indolent MCL usually lack SOX-11 expression. The pattern of SOX-11 staining has also been used a marker of prognosis. Cytoplasmic expression of MCl, seen in only a few cases was associated with a shorter survival as compared to the more common nuclear staining of SOX-11.

Conclusion

In this age, lymphoma diagnosis relies heavily on the use of immunohistochemical markers. However, this case highlights the importance of morphological features in diagnosing lymphomas with unusual immunohistochemical marker profile. Although, this case was negative for Cyclin D1, considered a hallmark of Mantle cell lymphoma, yet, the combination of morphological features with SOX-11 staining helped in clinching the diagnosis. To avoid a misdiagnosis, it would be prudent to perform SOX-11 staining in all lymphoma cases morphologically resembling MCL, but lacking Cyclin-D1.

-Swati Bhardwaj, MD has a special interest in surgical pathology and hematopathology. Follow her on Twitter at @Bhardwaj_swat.

–Kamran M. Mirza, MD, PhD, MLS(ASCP)CM is an Assistant Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical Education and Applied Health Sciences at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine and Parkinson School for Health Sciences and Public Health. A past top 5 honoree in ASCP’s Forty Under 40, Dr. Mirza was named to The Pathologist’s Power List of 2018 and placed #5 in the #PathPower List 2019. Follow him on twitter @kmirza.

Hematopathology Case Study: A 69 Year Old Male with Weight Loss and Generalized Lymphadenopathy

Case History

The patient is a 69 year old male who presented to the hospital with a 3-month history of drenching night sweats, weight loss, fatigue, and generalized lymphadenopathy. He also endorsed a very itchy rash all over his body. He denied smoking. There was no other relevant social or family history.

Physical examination confirmed diffuse lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly and a mild diffuse skin rash. Notably, there was a 2.5 cm level-1 lymph node palpated in the left neck. This was subsequently biopsied.

Biopsy

Biopsy of the level-1 neck lymph node revealed a 2.3 x 1.5 x 1.2 cm mass pink-tan and firm mass. Sectioning revealed a glossy white-tan cut surface. H&E staining revealed a polymorphic lymphocytic infiltrate of in the interfollicular zones. The infiltrating lymphocytes ranged from small to large cells with abundant cytoplasm, eosinophils, and plasma cells. There was also a notable increase in the number of high endothelial vessels lined by lymphocytes with irregular nuclear borders and clear cytoplasmic zones.

Image 1. Polymorphic infiltrate of small, mature appearing lymphocytes (A), with prominent blood vessels and clear cytoplasm (B). Most of these cells were CD3 positive T cells (C) with expanded CD21 positive FDC meshworks (D) and scattered CD30 positive immunoblasts (E)

Further characterization by immunohistochemical staining showed the majority of the interfollicular cells to be CD3 and CD5 expressing T cells. These were a mix of CD4 and CD8 positive cells but with marked CD4 predominance. CD7 appeared positive in a smaller population of T-cells compared to CD3 (consistent with loss of this pan-T-cell marker). Varying numbers of the interfollicular cells were positive for CD10, BCL-6, CXCL-13, and PD-1 with a strong positivity for ICOS, phenotypically consistent with an expansion of Tfh (T-follicular helper cell) cells.

Interspersed between the T cells were numerous CD20 positive cells with prominent nucleoli that also revealed CD30 positivity. CD21 staining revealed expanded follicular dendritic cell meshworks. EBER ISH was positive in a rare subset of cells. Kappa and lambda ISH showed an increased number of polytypic plasma cells.

Flow Cytometry showed the presence of a small population of T-cells that were CD4 positive but CD3 negative. There was no evidence of B-cell clonality. TCR-G PCR was positive.

A final diagnosis of Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) was rendered.

Discussion

AITL is a relatively rare neoplasm of mature T follicular helper cells, representing about 1-2% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas. It is; however, one of the more common subtypes of peripheral T-cell lymphomas, accounting for 15-30% of this subgroup. The condition was first reported in 1974 in Lancet as a non-neoplastic abnormal immune reaction1. It was first recognized as a distinct clinical entity in in 1994 in the Revised European American Lymphoma Classification2. The disease shows a geological preference to Europe (28.7%) over Asia (17.9%) and North America (16%). AITL occurs primarily in middle aged and elderly individuals and shows a slight predominance of males over females.

The disease has a strong association with EBV infection, but the neoplastic T-cells are almost always EBV negative, creating an interesting question of EBV’s function in the etiology of AITL. AITL most often presents late in the disease course with diffuse systemic involvement, including hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy and other symptoms such as rash with pruritis and arthritis. Lab findings include cold agglutinins, rheumatoid factor and anti-smooth muscle antibodies. There also tends to be immunodeficiency secondary to the neoplastic process. The clinical course of AITL is variable, but the prognosis is poor, with the average survival time after diagnosis being < 3 years. The histological features and genetic findings have not been found to impact clinical course.

Microscopically, AITL presents with either partial or total effacement of the normal lymph node architecture with perinodal infiltration. The cells of AITL are small to medium-sized lymphocytes with clear to pale cytoplasm, distinct cell membranes and very minimal cytological atypia. These cells often congregate around the high endothelial venules. The T-lymphocytes are present in a largely polymorphous inflammatory background of other lymphocytes, histiocytes, plasma cells and eosinophils. There are 3 overlapping sub-patterns of AITL. The first of these is similar to a reactive follicular hyperplasia, and can only be distinguished from normal hyperplasia by use of immunohistochemical stains to differentiate the neoplastic cells from normal reactive cells. The second pattern has retained follicles, but they show regressive changes. The third pattern has completely or sub totally effaced. These three patterns seem to be on a spectrum with one another, given that progression from the first to the third pattern has been seen on consecutive biopsies in the same patient.

Cytologically, AITL cells express pan-T-cell markers including CD2, CD3 and CD5 and the vast majority are CD4 positive. CD3 may be quantitatively decreased or absent by flow cytometry. There are a variable number of CD8 positive T-cells. The tumor cells also show the immunophenotyping of normal T follicular helper cells including CD10, CXCL13, ICOS, BCL6 and PD1 in 60-100% of cases. CXCL13 and CD10 are the most specific, whereas PD1 and ICOS are the most sensitive.

References

  1. Horne, C., Fraser, R., & Petrie, J. (1974). Angio-Immunoblastic Lymphadenopathy With Dysproteinemia. The Lancet, 304(7875), 291. doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(74)91455-x
  2. Harris, N.l. “A Revised European-American Classification of Lymphoid Neoplasms: a Proposal from the International Lymphoma Study Group.” Current Diagnostic Pathology, vol. 2, no. 1, 1994, pp. 58–59., doi:10.1016/s0968-6053(00)80051-4.
  3. Swerdlow, Steven H. WHO Classification of Tumours of Haematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues. International Agency for Research on Cancer, 2017.
  4. “Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma.” Pathology Outlines – PathologyOutlines.com, http://www.pathologyoutlines.com/topic/lymphomanonBAITL.html.

-Zachary Fattal is a 4th year medical student at the Central Michigan University College of Medicine. He is pursuing a career in pathology and has a special interest in hematopathology, cytopathology and blood bank/transfusion medicine. You can follow him on Twitter @Paraparacelsus.

Kamran M. Mirza, MD, PhD, MLS(ASCP)CM is an Assistant Professor of Pathology and Medical Education at Loyola University Health System. A past top 5 honoree in ASCP’s Forty Under 40, Dr. Mirza was named to The Pathologist’s Power List of 2018. Follow him on twitter @kmirza.