Lean Principles

Last month we touched on implementing lean principles to help improve efficiency within the lab, as opposed to relying strictly on physical changes. For example, purchasing a larger centrifuge as opposed to switching to a different methodology completely for your STAT testing needs. But what exactly does “lean” mean?

The overall focus of a “lean” laboratory is efficiency: optimizing delivery of results by efficiently utilizing resources, thereby reducing costs and improving speed (turnaround time). If a step or action does not add value, lean laboratories will seek to remove or minimize this perceived waste.

There are 8 key areas where lean processing can be applied to minimize waste, improve efficiency, and prevent unplanned downtime:

  1. Defects: This can apply to both your consumables (reagents, controls) as well as your instruments and equipment. QC reagents that are not as stable as the manufacturer claims them to be can lead to failures, repeats, and extra costs (and time). Older equipment may be more prone to failures and breaking down, leading to additional downtime. Ensure all maintenance tasks are completed on time to prevent these interruptions.
  • Overproduction: Performing testing that was not requested by the customer uses staff time and resources, and cannot be billed for. Evaluate your critical value policy – are you repeating and verifying every single critical result, even though the patient has been consistently running that way since admission? Consider tightening your delta check rules and only verifying values when the result is either new, or a significant change from the prior result.
  • Waiting: If a process is idle or stagnant, resources are being tied down that cannot be used to add value. There is value to batching certain tests due to QC requirements or cost (ELISA plates, electrophoresis gels); however waiting to batch CBC samples on an automated analyzer does not provide the same return value. Similarly, waiting until an instrument runs out of reagent completely before loading more on board can cause further delays if the reagent has special handling requirements (thawing, reconstituting) or has not yet been calibrated.

Evaluate your workload to ensure you have appropriate staffing levels that match your testing volume. If your laboratory receives a large drop off of samples from outpatient clinics at 5pm, consider staggering your work schedules so that you have coverage when you need it, while minimizing the amount of staff waiting for work to arrive.

  • Not engaging all employees: Your staff on the front lines are the experts – utilize this valuable resource by tapping into their creativity. Ask them what is working in your current process, and what they would like to see improved. You may be surprised by the innovative ideas they come up with, and they will have a vested interest in making the improvements work.
  • Transportation: Excessive movement of reagents or samples can lead to time wasted. Try to keep heavy or commonly used items stocked near the location they are used in. It is much easier to transfer a 5 gallon reagent cube from a storage shelf within the hematology department than to bring it up from a central supply room 3 floors below the lab. When possible, utilize automation to process samples and organize completed tubes ready for long-term storage.
  • Inventory: Determine appropriate par levels for each consumable, and avoid over ordering when possible. Excess inventory ties up capital budget, space, and depending on the product can risk wastage due to short expiration dates. For items requiring a long lead time (heavy reagent cubes traveling via ground shipping), plan accordingly to avoid excess rush delivery costs. Within your inventory management system, include all necessary information so that all staff can reorder supplies when the par threshold is exceeded: full description of the item, photo, physical location where it is stored, supplier, item #, par level, amount to order.
  • Motion/Distances: Reduce excess travel and motion of both your staff and your samples to improve efficiency. Strive to create a continuous process flow when designing your lab work areas. Work should move along the process path in a smooth and uninterrupted stream; rather than having to keep returning back to a different bench or department. If different departments frequently share specimens (CBC and HA1c on the same tube), consider colocation of these areas to reduce excess motion between them.
  • Extra processing: Performing non-value added work, having redundant paperwork, or overly complicated processing steps can lead to errors and wasted time. Focus on simplification and standardization. For example, consider implementing a barcode scanner to reduce transcription errors associated with manual entry of values.

When looking to implement lean processes within your lab, start small. Look to see which departments or processing steps are generating the most waste and focus your efforts in those areas first. Even small steps can yield a big return when executed well. Efficient labs lead to happy techs; happy techs lead to successful labs.

https://www.mt.com/us/en/home/library/guides/laboratory-division/1/lean_lab_guide.html

-Kyle Nevins, MS, MLS(ASCP)CM is one of ASCP’s 2018 Top 5 in the 40 Under Forty recognition program. She has worked in the medical laboratory profession for over 18 years. In her current position, she transitions between performing laboratory audits across the entire Northwell Health System on Long Island, NY, consulting for at-risk laboratories outside of Northwell Health, bringing laboratories up to regulatory standards, and acting as supervisor and mentor in labs with management gaps.

Working With Baby Boomers: How Other Generations Can Adapt

Baby Boomers were for a long time to largest working generation in the workplace. They are slowly retiring and the next largest generation, Generation Y, is becoming the largest. However, Baby Boomers’ impact on the workplace is still profound and most organizations, if not all, are currently employing many Boomers. They are likely to be working in leadership roles and exert influence on many policies, procedures, systems, and organizational cultures.

Similar to Traditionalists, Baby boomers also appreciate face-to-face meetings. However, their preference for leaving and receiving voicemails is a lot higher than Traditionalists. They also appreciate social media more, especially as their children and grandchildren are using it. Baby Boomers utilize the internet more than Traditionalists and send text messages, even if they still prefer to talk over the phone instead of texting.

Working with Baby Boomers is all about the relationship. Establishing interpersonal connection should therefore be one of your main priorities when collaborating with someone from this generation. Because of the personal nature of their working style, it can sometimes take a few weeks (or longer) for decisions to be made. Calculate that in when working on a proposal or project. Baby Boomers appreciate formal presentations and a consensus-based process.

A Baby Boomers’ approach to leadership centers on incentives, data-driven decisions, and a democratic process. They typically are open to input from peers and their leadership style is friendly. They value receiving recognition, so any award or reward is appreciated and they will often display them publically. Because of their focus on interpersonal relationships, they do not respond to people who are not friendly and who indicate their hierarchy. Instead, make sure that they feel you are listening to them and including them. One way to do this is by taking notes and asking follow up questions.

Baby Boomers’ professional dream is continuing to be useful and productive in the workplace while feeling they are wanted and rewarded. If you want to increase your working relationship with Baby Boomers, connect with them on an interpersonal level by inviting them out to lunch and get to know who they are outside of the workplace. Provide them with positive affirmations, recognitions, and awards to make them feel they are a valued members of the organization and that they input and work is essential to producing results. Baby Boomers bring a lot of patients, experience, and knowledge and they help create and foster a team environment when they feel they are contributing members of the organization. Do not show impatience and question their ways of doing things openly. If you do need them to change something, include them in the process to make it a consensual and democratic process. Adding a Baby Boomer to a team can greatly improve the outcomes and success of that team.

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-Lotte Mulder earned her Master’s of Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 2013, where she focused on Leadership and Group Development. She’s currently working toward a PhD in Organizational Leadership. At ASCP, Lotte designs and facilitates the ASCP Leadership Institute, an online leadership certificate program. She has also built ASCP’s first patient ambassador program, called Patient Champions, which leverages patient stories as they relate to the value of the lab.


I’d like to tell you a story that happened at the ASCP Annual Meeting last October, 2018 in Baltimore.

Lotte Mulder and I presented a course on “Discovering Your Diversity Strengths” to about fifty people. Lotte is a Millennial and I am a Baby Boomer, and we’ve been working closely together for over three years on a daily basis. The presentation went really well and the audience was very participative and interactive. We talked about how different we were, how we complimented each other, and the value of human diversity in the workplace. 

At noon that day, we both participated in a Lunch Roundtable where the topic was Diversity in the laboratory. We quickly learned that those at our table had a strong interest and frustration about working with people from different generations. The focus was primarily on Millennials and Boomers. There were eight other people at our table and they each shared their frustration about working in the lab with either older or younger people.

This was a real opportunity for us to share the generational strengths and differences with each of these people. The Boomers seemed to think that the Millennials didn’t have a good work ethic. The more I asked questions of those in both generational groups, the more I was able to help them to share their opinions and/or frustrations. Most importantly, I made a point of asking each person what was important to them in the workplace.

The Millennials learned that the Boomers were “bred” to work beyond the expectations of their job. Most importantly, they found their identity in their work. This is one reason the “Boomer co-worker” delayed their retirement because of the fear of losing their identity.

The Boomers learned that the Millennials had a very good work ethic, they just valued work-life balance. It was actually Generation X that introduced work life balance to the workplace and the Millennials bought into the concept. The other strength of the Millennial is their passion for finding a purpose in their job.

By the time our hour was up, you could see the difference in how they related to each other. It’s amazing what education and awareness can do for people.

As a final note, the next day we co-taught a course on Stress Management. Wouldn’t you know it, we experienced the same situation at our “Stress Management Roundtable” lunch! It was fun to see how people began to see their co-workers through a different lens.

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-Catherine Stakenas, MA, is the Senior Director of Organizational Leadership and Development and Performance Management at ASCP. She is certified in the use and interpretation of 28 self-assessment instruments and has designed and taught masters and doctoral level students.  

Personal and Situational Variables of Leadership Development

Several aspects influence whether people learn from experiences in order to become a better leader. These variables can either be personal traits of the individual learner or situational aspects of the circumstances. Both personal and situational variables of experiential learning increase the development of leaders.

Personal Variables

Being exposed to experiences does not necessarily mean that people learn from them. There are some personal attributes necessary to foster learning from experiences in order to develop one’s leadership potential. The main variable that influences experiential learning is the capacity and practice of self-reflection. Being able to draw lessons from experiences is indeed what drives leadership development and self-reflection increases the number of lessons noticed in each experience. Furthermore, experiences that are challenging promote learning. How challenging an experience is can be seen as situational, however it is also personal as some people are more drawn to challenging experiences than others. Additionally, motivation to learn increases experiential leadership development. Whether the learning is motivated through goals, actions, or to simply seek knowledge, motivation influences leadership development.

In addition to being reflective, motivated, and challenged, experiential learners also need to think and act. Thinking is important because it allows the learning to plan and strategize. Finally, acting is one of the most critical aspects of learning, because it closes the cycle of learning and creates the next cycle of experiential learning.

Furthermore, assessments bring a deep level of self-awareness about their behavioral and thinking patterns, behaviors, and preferences. Knowing what one does well, where one can improve, and where the developmental gaps are is essential for leadership development. The experience with assessment is both a personal and situational variable, because how people are rated or rate themselves depends on the situation and on the personality of the person being rated. Finally, vicarious learning is learning through other people’s experiences. However, not everyone who witness other people’s leadership challenges, solutions, and behaviors develop their own leadership skills. Therefore, this is both a situational and personal variable as a person needs to be motivated to learn but also needs access to a vicarious learning opportunity.

Situational Variables

Some of the factors that influence learning from experiences are situational. This means that people have to be in a specific type of situation in order to not merely experience something but to increase their leadership effectiveness based on that experience. Experiences in themselves are situational; for the most part one cannot make certain experiences happen but they happen to people instead. However, there are three specific aspects of employment that people can seek that foster situational learning opportunities. The first one is getting a new job, changing job status, or job location. There is a tremendous amount of experiential learning that takes place when one of these aspects of a current job changes. The second is a change in task-related characteristics, such as a process or systems change. Thirdly, obstacles increase learning. Such obstacles can be difficult supervisors or employees, another company launching a similar program, or a crisis. All these experiences promote learning because jobs are central in leadership development, as well as, different assignments and experience with obstacles.

Support is an additional situational variable that increases learning. Support promotes learning because it makes people feel reassured and safe. Feeling safe also increases learners’ motivation, competency, and self-efficacy, which all promotes learning. Additionally narrative accounts shared by leaders and the organization promotes learning from experience, even if the narratives are fictional. Hearing stories about effective and ineffective leadership increases listeners’ own leadership skills through cognitive elaboration and transportation. Finally, allowing people to experience the consequences of decisions increases their learning and develop their leadership potential. Experiencing the consequences will increase people’s understanding of the impact of decisions and how departments and tasks are interconnected.

People learn in many different ways, but we all go through experiences, whether they happen to people directly, through vicarious learning, or through narratives. The better leaders can maximize learning from experiences, the more prepared the next generation of leaders will be to tackle challenges, dilemmas, and problems.

 

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-Lotte Mulder earned her Master’s of Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 2013, where she focused on Leadership and Group Development. She’s currently working toward a PhD in Organizational Leadership. At ASCP, Lotte designs and facilitates the ASCP Leadership Institute, an online leadership certificate program. She has also built ASCP’s first patient ambassador program, called Patient Champions, which leverages patient stories as they relate to the value of the lab.

Meaningful Metrics

Performance improvement (PI) metrics are a great way to assess the overall quality of your laboratory program. They allow you to track vital data related to CMS outcome measures, which can directly impact the financial well being of your organization. However, labs should be careful when choosing which metrics to monitor, and should routinely evaluate if the metrics they’re using are still meaningful to them.

Even a small laboratory will generate a ton of data throughout the year. The key questions to ask yourself are: 1) What do I want to know? 2) What will I do about it once I have the answer?

There may be different sets of metrics that laboratories will have to monitor and report, depending upon who the target audience of the final data analysis will be. Metrics and reports can be generated for your patients/customers, internal laboratory staff, management, and senior leadership. You may also be called upon to share your metrics with regulatory agencies as well to prove the effectiveness of your quality assurance program.

Ensure your reports are relevant and meaningful to the audience they are being shared with. Customer/Patient centered metrics can include items such as satisfaction survey results, average waiting time for outpatient blood drawing locations, and average cost/revenue per test. Internal laboratory staff metrics can include turnaround time reports for STAT tests, compliance with critical call notifications to providers, and percent completion for required monthly maintenance tasks. Higher level metrics that can be reported to management and administration may include performance on proficiency testing surveys, regulatory inspection results, and percent of corrected reports that were issued.

If goals have been met and sustained consistently, consider raising the bar and challenging yourself even further. Each metric should have 3 goals: 1) Minimum Threshold (must be achieved each review period), 2) Annual Goal (desired overall goal to account for monthly fluctuations in the data), 3) Stretch Goal (motivational tool, achievable but not guaranteed a high rate of success). Increase your minimum threshold limits to be closer to your stretch goals, and see what your particular organization can realistically meet and sustain. Be careful to not set unrealistic expectations, as this can lower morale and result in misleading interpretations of the data. Work with your clinicians and regulatory agencies to determine appropriate, and realistic goals, and utilize national benchmark standards when available.

Metrics that were added to address and monitor a specific known issue or problem should be evaluated for necessity once the issue is corrected. Consider reducing the monitoring of these items from monthly down to quarterly, semi-annually, or annually until you have confidence that it no longer requires monitoring.

When issues are identified, a root cause investigation should be performed with the intent of identifying the true cause of the problem – not to point blame to a particular person. The depth and intensity of your investigation will depend upon the specific metric which failed to meet its goal.

Properly identify the problem. To learn from our mistakes, we must first properly identify them. What may seem like an obvious root cause, may not be the real reason for an issue. For example, turnaround time metrics – if you did not complete STAT troponin tests in <45 minutes, simply purchase a new instrument that is faster. Well, it’s not quite that simple.

Break it down further into pre-analytic, analytic, and post-analytic times. Is the bulk of your 45 minute window taken up in the pre-analytic phase? Are samples being held in a central receiving area for 20 minutes and batched before being brought to the chemistry department? Are you testing serum (which needs to first clot before being spun) or plasma (which can be spun down immediately)? Is there a delay in verifying/releasing results into your LIS where autoverification would improve this process?

Before attributing instrument downtime as a cause, confirm that the outliers were in fact during the time period when the instrument was down. There’s a higher chance you have a pattern of poor TAT performance around change of shifts or meal breaks, than during a 6hr downtime on a single day in the month. Also look at how you are analyzing your metrics to ensure they are accurate. Are you including add-on tests based on their original received time, or based on when the troponin was added to the original order?

Develop a corrective action/preventive action plan. Based on what you identified to be the true root cause(s) that contributed to poor PI metrics, develop a plan for addressing these weaknesses. Identify who specifically will be responsible for performing each step in the action plan, and who will be held accountable for ensuring it was performed.

Implement the plan(s). Document the date the corrections were fully implemented, along with any delays or obstacles encountered.

Collect and analyze more data. Depending on the severity of the failed metric, you may want to begin analyzing the effectiveness of your improvement plan immediately. If there was a spike in the number of employee safety incidents reported last month due to ongoing construction in a department, the work conditions should be monitored daily/weekly for improvements.

Conversely, looking at data too soon may not paint an accurate picture of the true effectiveness of your corrective actions. Some corrective action plans may require several steps or phases for full implementation. For example, a process change will require an update to your procedure manual, retraining of all staff, and then rolling out the new process. This may take several days-weeks before 100% implemented and improvements can be detected.

Monitor the results. Check for sustainability of your corrections – staff may be on their best behavior the first week after being spoken to, but can return to old habits after that. They may not fully understand that although one process is easier for them, it is adversely affecting the overall performance of the entire lab team.

If you are consistently struggling to meet your metrics, consider looking for ways to implement lean process changes. Upgrading to a STAT spin centrifuge may save you 5 minutes on the pre-analytical side; but you may still have room for improvement. Do you consistently receive 20 samples at a time, meanwhile your centrifuge will only hold 8 tubes? Do you receive tubes of different sizes (adult vs pediatric), and is your centrifuge capable of quickly and easily interchanging inserts to accommodate both types?

Ultimately, be sure to engage your frontline staff and listen to their opinions on what is working, and what could be improved upon. They are the ones doing the tasks day in/day out, and are your subject experts on where some of the shortfalls may lie. Even if the answer is simply not having enough staff available, having detailed analytical metrics can help management justify the cost of adding additional team members, and also pinpoint the exact days and times where the help is needed most.

Bio

Kyle Nevins, MS, MLS(ASCP)CM is one of ASCP’s 2018 Top 5 in the 40 Under Forty recognition program. She has worked in the medical laboratory profession for over 18 years, and is currently employed at Northwell Health Laboratories on Long Island, NY. In her current position as a Laboratory Supervisor for the Northwell Consulting Team, she transitions between performing laboratory audits across the entire Northwell Health System, consulting for at-risk laboratories outside of Northwell Health, bringing laboratories up to regulatory standards and acting as supervisor and mentor in labs with management gaps.

-Kyle Nevins, MS, MLS(ASCP)CM is one of ASCP’s 2018 Top 5 in the 40 Under Forty recognition program. She has worked in the medical laboratory profession for over 18 years. In her current position, she transitions between performing laboratory audits across the entire Northwell Health System on Long Island, NY, consulting for at-risk laboratories outside of Northwell Health, bringing laboratories up to regulatory standards, and acting as supervisor and mentor in labs with management gaps.

Contextual Factors of Work

Work is central to the human experience, even though the actual practice of work has continuously changed through the decades. These changes impact personal life as well, since there is a strong correlation between work life and life outside of formalized productivity. There are certain factors that influence how work is practiced that impact people’s approach to work.

The first factor is technology. Technology has significantly altered the practice and implications or work. For example, try to compare what office work was like 50 years ago compared to now, or how laboratory diagnostics were different back then. In today’s age, the majority work tasks are conducted on the computer or through technological advances: emailing, writing, analyzing, diagnosing. Fifty years ago, such tasks were conducted via phone, typewriters, or by hand. Technology has also increased the amount of information available to workers. This information allows organizations to prepare to lead in a VUCA world, namely one that is volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous.

The second factor that influences work is globalization. Through the increase in technology and information as mentioned above, cultural, linguistic, and national boundaries do not impact the work environment as much as they did. Such lack of confines pushes both organizations and individual workers to be more competitive due to reduced market and job security, respectively. On the other hand, it also increases collaborations and opportunities to help others. For example, through telepathology, we are now able to provide diagnostics to people in places that do not have access to local laboratory services.

The third factor that has an impact on work is the psychological contract between worker and employer. During the industrial age, this contract was mostly stable and predictable and was based on the assumption that if workers performed well, had integrity, and were responsible their work created a sense of connection. In today’s work culture, this contract has shifted towards a focus on self-development, experience, and personal long-term goals instead of a long-term relationship between worker and employer.

Lastly, a factor that influences work is the knowledge gap. Since many of the unskilled jobs are now conducted by computerized machines, employers will rely more on workers with specific skills and knowledge. However, educational opportunities are not equally distributed and the lower classes are at a clear disadvantage.

It is important to understand these factors when working with people from different educational, technological, and cultural backgrounds. All these factors influence people and how they perform their jobs.

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-Lotte Mulder earned her Master’s of Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 2013, where she focused on Leadership and Group Development. She’s currently working toward a PhD in Organizational Leadership. At ASCP, Lotte designs and facilitates the ASCP Leadership Institute, an online leadership certificate program. She has also built ASCP’s first patient ambassador program, called Patient Champions, which leverages patient stories as they relate to the value of the lab.

On Lab Medicine: A Model for Quality Improvement

What do gopher holes have in common with quality improvement? More than you might think! In a paper available on Lab Medicine’s advanced access, Dr. Yaolin Zhou writes about a novel framework for quality improvement initiatives called EPIDEM, or “explore, promote, implement, document, evaluate, and modify.”

Read the paper and let us know what you think! 

Working with Traditionalists: How Other Generations Can Adapt

Traditionalists are the oldest working generation in today’s professional environments. They bring a wealth of information, knowledge, and experience with them. Therefore, organizations that work with Traditionalists either on their staff or on their Boards are fortunate to have access to their input. In order learn as much as possible from this generation, while they are still present in the workplace, it is critical to know and understand their preferred way of communicating, leading, and working. It is also important to know how and when to adapt your own preferred communication, behavioral, and leadership styles to meet the needs and preferences of this

generation.

Typically, Traditionalists prefer face-to-face communication. They grew up with limited communication technology and they prefer to connect in person when possible. If you cannot communicate in person, pick up the phone and call them. Not only is this respectful to their own preferences, it will allow you to increase your verbal communications skills when there is no written form used. Having a personal touch is important, so try not to talk business right away but take time to get to know one another.

When meeting with Traditionalists, some formal protocol is appreciated. Have someone else introduce you, or if you are in charge of the meeting make sure to introduce everyone properly. You can add a personal touch if appropriate. For example, say “This is Betty Jones. She is the current President of our Board of Directors and has been a member of our organization for over forty years. She is here to provide us with strategic details about our new direction. Also, she is an avid fly-fisher!” Additionally, pay attention to meeting protocols such as offering something to drink and sending the agenda ahead of time so that they can prepare. This is, of course, good to do with everyone, but Traditionalists respond especially well to such protocol.

Their leadership style is based on a chain of command and creating contingency plans. They dislike indecisiveness, disrespect, profanity, and poor dress. They appreciate a sense of formality and high quality work. I always think about how Traditionalists dressed, and sometimes still dress, when going on a plane. They dressed very formal, especially compared to today’s travelers. Keep this in mind when meeting with them in person. Forego the jeans and sweaters and wear something more traditionally professional. Finally, use formal address, such as Sir, Doctor, and Madam. Again, the more professional protocol you use, especially in the beginning, will set you up for success when working with them.

Personally, I learned and witnessed that if you include this generation in inquiry-based conversations and discussions that you can learn about additional leadership approaches to increase your own adaptability. Learn from other generations as much as possible, especially the ones that are currently leaving the workforce. There is a lot to be gained from generational diversity and increasing your own ability to meet the needs of every generation in the workplace.

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-Lotte Mulder earned her Master’s of Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 2013, where she focused on Leadership and Group Development. She’s currently working toward a PhD in Organizational Leadership. At ASCP, Lotte designs and facilitates the ASCP Leadership Institute, an online leadership certificate program. She has also built ASCP’s first patient ambassador program, called Patient Champions, which leverages patient stories as they relate to the value of the lab.


At the ASCP Annual Meeting this October, I had the privilege of facilitating a Roundtable Discussion about diversity in the workplace. I anticipated that we might be talking about issues such as culture, religion, gender, ethnicity, educational level, ability/disability and possibly age and generational issues. I was anticipating a very rich and “diverse” list of topics for this discussion.

To my surprise, generational differences was the primary topic for this Roundtable Discussion. There were nine people at our table with representation from both sub-sets of the Baby Boomer group, as well as, the Gen Xers, and Millennials (Gen Y). There seemed to be a strong disconnect between the Millennials and Gen Xers and the older people in the lab, meaning the Boomers and Traditionalists.

The Traditionalist generation only represents about 5% of the workers in clinical labs, however, the Baby Boomers still represent about half of the work force in the clinical labs. The strongest point of dissention seemed to center on “work life balance.” There was clearly a lack of knowledge and understanding on both parts. Baby Boomers are known for their work ethic and learned well from their Traditionalist’s parents and role models. They identify with their job, profession, and career. This is why we still have Traditionalists and Boomers working in the laboratories. They possess the institutional knowledge, relationships, and a strong sense of loyalty.

The Gen X and Y “work life balance” issue collided with the strong sense of work ethic characterized by the Traditionalists and Boomers. However, once each generation were able to share what they valued, there was a light bulb that appeared at the table and the bridge of understanding began to be built.

So what’s the key to collaboration? It’s all about talking with each other and asking good questions. The Traditionalists can learn from our Gen Xers and Millennials and focus on work life balance. Just as it is important for the Gen Xers and Gen Ys to learn about the institutional knowledge and work practices that can be gleaned from the Traditionalists.

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-Catherine Stakenas, MA, is the Senior Director of Organizational Leadership and Development and Performance Management at ASCP. She is certified in the use and interpretation of 28 self-assessment instruments and has designed and taught masters and doctoral level students.