Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

Let me be honest and straightforward: this was not my favorite model when I first learned about it. Until, that is, I went through the certification to become a trainer and I fell head over heels in love, despite it being more complicated and intricate than the other models used and discussed in the Leadership Institute. The MBTI provides a deep understanding of your personality traits, natural skills, and tendencies while highlighting skills you have learned along the way. As an added bonus, this understanding isn’t tied to any life role (work, parent, child, friend, etc.). I, for instance, have a slight preference for extraversion with a lot of introversion tendencies. However, I usually come across as highly extraverted, as I learned to act more extraverted because my sister was very shy growing up and I wanted to balance it out.

The MBTI focuses on your innate personality preference, organized into four dichotomies:

  • Extraversion vs. Introversion (E –I)
  • Sensing vs. Intuition (S – N)
  • Thinking vs. Feeling (T – F)
  • Judging vs. Perceiving (J – P)

Your preferences in each category, when combined, are your type. For example, if I had a preference for Introversion (I), Sensing (S), Feeling (F), and Perceiving (P), my type would be ISFP. This type gives me insights into how I interact with others, process information, come to conclusions, and approach the outside world. Understanding this will allow me to know my strengths and weaknesses as well as those of others. As a leader, applying that knowledge effectively in different situations and with different people is essential.

 

lotte-small

-Lotte Mulder earned her Master’s of Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 2013, where she focused on Leadership and Group Development. She’s currently toward a PhD in Organizational Leadership. At ASCP, Lotte designs and facilitates the ASCP Leadership Institute, an online leadership certificate program. She has also built ASCP’s first patient ambassador program, called Patient Champions, which leverages patient stories as they relate to the value of the lab.

 

Yin and Yang

Who would have thought that our personality is made of contradicting elements?

I truly enjoyed the MBTI course, it was an eye opener of who I am and a trip inwards. Knowing who we really are, our talents, comfort zones and blind spots will help us become better leaders.

So now I know and after all these years (on a personal or professional level) that I am an “ENFP,” these four letters mean that I tend to be extraverted, intuitive, feeling and perceiving. I do agree with the assessment as it reflects who I am and decided after taking the course to put my Middle Eastern Ego aside and not challenge the blind spots.

ENFPs see new possibilities in people, situations, tasks and projects at hand. We tend to have high energy and flexibility. In my line of work, being the Chief Quality Officer at MedLabs Consultancy Group in Amman-Jordan, I find these personal traits very critical to our success as a company to ensure the highest compliance in implementing quality standards throughout our network of laboratories spanning four countries and exceeding 50 in total. Being a people’s person is a great asset in order to touch the hearts, minds and souls of our staff to sustain these quality standards, being 150% convinced rather than simply following the rules. We are trying to “personalize” Quality and Safety, this can only be accomplished through connecting with each staff member and it requires inspiration, a trait that is “built in” ENFPs.

Looking at the blind spots, I find that we tend to get overexcited about projects, juggling many at the same time and loosing track of priorities in the hope of making a difference. Guilty as charged.

I am learning to take one project at a time, see it through completion and start the next one in the pipeline, this gave me and my colleagues a breather and time to reflect if the road that we are taking is indeed the correct one.

So now I am asking myself, what if I did not have the great opportunity to be part of the ASCP Leadership Program and I have missed out on MBTI? What if I did not realize that I am an ENFP? What if I could not appreciate the blind spots?

The simple answer is: I will be a classical leader in it for the title, with little contributions and not much of a positive effect on those who are around me. My job will be stale, with no spirit and dull, so I guess Yin and Yang actually works.

 

Soudi

-Nael M. Soudi holds a bachelor degree in Microbiology from State University of New York at Plattsburgh (USA). He completed both his Master Degree in Molecular Biology and a postgraduate program in Cytotechnology at Johns Hopkins University (USA). Mr. Soudi is a certified Practitioner in Health Care Quality (CPHQ) and a certified consultant and inspector with the Healthcare Accreditation Council. He is also certified by the International Academy of Cytology (IAC) and the American Society of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP) – Cytology. Mr. Soudi is fully licensed by the American Society of Clinical Pathologists and the College of American Pathologist (CAP) as a Certified Inspector. He is a frequent presenter at regional and international conferences discussing topics in Cytology, leadership, accreditation and healthcare quality. 

Leadership is WEadership

Leadership is all about the other person; it is about adapting your own behavior and communications styles to meet the needs of the people you are leading. However, in order to be able to adapt your own behavior, you first need to learn about yourself.  Discovering your natural leadership styles, communication and delegation preferences, views about conflict, and your strengths and weaknesses will improve your leadership abilities. This learning requires a deep-dive analysis through one (or preferably all) of these methods:

  • Self-reflection
  • Feedback from others
  • Coaching
  • Self-assessments

Personally I have always been drawn to constructive feedback so I can discover areas for growth. It’s not always pleasant to hear, but we all have blind spots, and feedback is a crucial first step in personal and professional development. In the last few years I have added another layer of self-discovery: self-assessments. In my experience, self-assessments give you 1) a sense that you are not alone; that your thoughts, behaviors, the ways in which you process information are not different than everyone else but that there are people who behave, think, and process in similar ways, 2) a deeper sense of understanding where your behavior or communication preferences come from, and 3) a practical understanding of people who act differently than you and how to approach them more effectively. In other words, self-assessments are a way to acknowledge one’s own behavior and that of others. So much of leadership is about acknowledging other people through adapting your own behavior.

When I got hired to create a Leadership Institute for ASCP members, I used self-assessments as the cornerstone of our curriculum. I want our members to have access to the same level of awareness and development that I have enjoyed throughout the years. Learning about your motivators and blind sides is crucial before you can truly turn leadership into WEadership.

 

lotte-small

-Lotte Mulder earned her Master’s of Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 2013, where she focused on Leadership and Group Development. At ASCP, Lotte designs and facilitates the ASCP Leadership Institute, an online leadership certificate program. She has also built ASCP’s first patient ambassador program, called Patient Champions, which leverages patient stories as they relate to the value of the lab.

Steady the Ship

The relationships you have as a supervisor with the people you lead (notice I did not say “manage”) are important when it comes to day to day operations. They become especially important is when you have to guide them through change or conflict. I won’t even comment on the appropriateness of intimate relationships except to say if you engage in one then you are taking your career into your own hands and don’t plan on it lasting long. Beyond that, the lines are blurred and you may be engaging in an inappropriate relationship that won’t get you in trouble with management but will with the people you lead.

I am 31 years old and the majority of the people I lead are double my age so I have a unique (but becoming a bit more common) relationship with them. With many reaching retirement age in the near future the younger generation is taking the responsibility of leading and it creates unique issues. Do I sometimes feel awkward discussing a behavioral incident with someone who could be my grandmother? Absolutely, but my approach is what makes it a successful or unsuccessful discussion. I have learned that a “by the book” or “letter of the law” approach is not always successful. This is where emotional intelligence comes into play. As a leader you need to identify the needs of the people you lead, both as a group and individuals. It is very important to distinguish between the two because the needs of the group may be vastly different than as individuals. Once you do this it is easier to lead them because you know what they need to be successful and what you need to avoid, staving off failures. If you can successfully identify the needs of the group and individuals you can have relationships that grow and the people you lead will have confidence in you to lead them.

One issue that gets supervisor/managers into trouble is favoritism. It doesn’t even have to be true; perception in any workplace is often seen as fact. If one employee thinks that you favor another employee over them you will instantly lose their respect (not to mention a certain amount of work ethic). This can be especially difficult if you have worked with a group for an amount of time as coworkers and then you are promoted to supervisor. You will already have developed relationships and more than likely friendships with them so some of the perceptions may start with the start of your new role. If this is the case it may be a good idea to have a discussion with the group once the new role is assumed.

I have had the experience of taking over for someone that had their responsibilities taken away so I had some hard feelings to deal with when I took over. It was very difficult but I learned that if I took it day by day and worked with each individual they eventually came around and understood I was only there to help. There are all different kinds of situations that pop up as we lead our teams. We fight fires and make sure we don’t take on too much water that we cannot float. If you do not address these issues when they present themselves you may wait too long and not be able to steady the ship.

 

Herasuta

Matthew Herasuta, MBA, MLS(ASCP)CM is a medical laboratory scientist who works as a generalist and serves as the Blood Bank and General Supervisor for the regional Euclid Hospital in Cleveland, OH.