Happy New Year—Making 2014 a Year to Remember

If you are one who likes to make a resolution for the New Year, let’s have a look at the word “resolve”:

re·solve:

verb:  settle or find a solution to (a problem, dispute, or conflict); to sort out, solve, deal with, rectify;  to decide firmly on a course of action; determine, decide, make up one’s mind, make a decision
noun: resolve, resolution; determination to do something, strength or decisive commitment

Or, another way to define it might be, “re – solve”.  Laboratory professionals are trained and skilled at solving problems, particularly analytical ones; why not “resolve” to “re – solve” something? Perhaps this is your year to make a commitment to giving back to your profession, your faith, your future. Consider volunteering, either at your laboratory, your hospital or clinic, your community, or perhaps even globally. There is no end to the list of opportunities for service, using skills and training to add value to improving health. If you want some ideas, just contact me at bsumwalt@pacbell.net and I’d be very happy to explore the idea with you!

This is one of my favorite quotes—let’s make 2014 a Year to Remember!

“How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world.”  ~Anne Frank

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Beverly Sumwalt, MA, DLM, CLS, MT(ASCP) is an ASCP Global Outreach Volunteer Consultant.

Dangerous Beauty

Potentially deadly pathogens have never looked so good. A false-color electron-microscope slideshow on Discover depicts organisms such as Campylobacter and Streptococcus pyogenes in a whole new light. Apparently actresses and models aren’t the only ones who benefit from Photoshop.

 

Swails

Kelly Swails, MT(ASCP), is a laboratory professional, recovering microbiologist, and web editor for Lab Medicine.

Season’s Greetings—International Style

In this season of extending kindnesses and gifts and sharing the blessings of family and friends, I am reminded of something I have heard many times; World peace isn’t achieved in government board rooms or international caucuses…it is achieved quietly in each other’s homes, around the table, one-one-one, face to face.  I believe that is true; and some of the most lasting impressions I have of the world and the world’s people have been gifted to me in conversation, at the table, exchanging ideas, thoughts and building relationships and forging ways ahead to make health and care better globally.  This is the essence of change and the heart and soul of peace and prosperity.  May this season bring peace and joy, no matter where you live or what faith you follow, and may we all strive to sing the melody and the harmony together whenever we can.

Happy Holidays!

 

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Beverly Sumwalt, MA, DLM, CLS, MT(ASCP) is an ASCP Global Outreach Volunteer Consultant.

Harmonization

What does “harmony” mean to you? And how does it apply to lab testing?

One of the biggest problems that arise where lab testing is concerned is that tests run in two different labs will give you two different results unless the labs happen to be using the same equipment (and sometimes even then the results won’t match!) This is a huge problem for doctors of patients who use different laboratories for their testing or patients who move across the country and need to continue following lab test results.  A prime example of this dilemma is the current state of T4 testing. The same CAP sample when analyzed using different assay methods for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) can yield results which range anywhere from 2.66 to 8.84 mIU/L. Although CAP samples are not always commutable with patient samples, thyroid testing on patients shows this same lack of harmony.

This example underscores the need for harmonization. In our increasingly small world, where nearly everyone will soon be using the electronic medical record, and all lab results on a patient will be in one place whether they were all performed at the same place or not, it will be paramount that the lab results for any given test can be compared. Efforts to date have successfully harmonized several important analytes, including creatinine (IDMS-creatinine), cholesterol and hemoglobin A1c.  Efforts are on-going to harmonize vitamin D assays against the NIST standards. These harmonization efforts took a massive amount of coordination and work between the in vitro diagnostic industry, regulatory agencies and laboratory and clinical societies.

Laboratory professionals have long recognized this problem, and sought to inform non-laboratorians of the realities at every opportunity. Lack of comparable test results can lead to patient safety issues, including misdiagnoses and/or inappropriate treatment. Recently an international consortium has recognized the need for harmonization of all lab results and begun to work on the problem. Although this effort is just beginning and the road ahead is long until general test harmonization can occur, it is a road worth traveling.

 

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-Patti Jones PhD, DABCC, FACB, is the Clinical Director of the Chemistry and Metabolic Disease Laboratories at Children’s Medical Center in Dallas, TX and a Professor of Pathology at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.

Happy Holidays from Lab Medicine

It’s going to be a little quiet here over the next few weeks while our team of mad scientist writers enjoy time with their families. We’ll be back in action after the New Year with lots of great information for you. In the meantime, the editors of Lab Medicine would like to wish you and yours a happy and safe holiday season.

 

 

Pathologist and Pathologist-in-Training Engagement as Patient Advocates

I’m used to being surrounded by people who are passionate about transforming systems. I’ve spent many years involved in organizing grassroots movements, health advocacy, and health equity campaigns in the minority and immigrant communities. And the year before I started residency, I studied for a masters degree in public health where I focused on these same issues,  along with more scientific training in molecular and infectious disease epidemiology. But as a resident, I have had to make some tough choices.

Even though I am back in Chicago where I attended college and first got involved working with minority and immigrant health issues, my community organizing, for now, will take a back seat to my education and service duties. And even though I sometimes reminisce about and miss the electrifying momentum involved in pushing toward such social change, I know that once I’m finished my training that I can return to contributing to these movements again on a more personal level. So I’m fine with the decisions I’ve had to make. We all have to make choices about what is most important at that specific time in our lives.

And so as a resident, I’ve focused my thoughts and efforts on how to create a movement within pathology to question our role on the clinical patient care team and to engage those in our profession to respond to this question – reasons why I got more involved with ASCP and CAP. With the gradual implementation of portions of the ACA since 2008 that is now moving into a more palpable phase, pathologists, tech staff, and residents have an opportunity to show our worth to the health care team. We have the opportunity to show that we are the experts in data interpretation and that in terms of more complicated testing such as flow cytometry, cytogenetics, or molecular tests, that the pathologist would be the best person to order the most appropriate tests.

No one knows better that we do what are the costs, indications, and limits of specific tests and despite what non-pathologists may think, we were trained just as they were in how to work up a patient and differential diagnosis. So who better to choose the right test for the right patient at the right time? I know that pathologists have the reputation of being not the most vocal or interactive doctors so how do we engage not just our leaders but also pathologists in general to take more ownership of patient care decisions and to speak up? How do we train our next generation to also see this as the big picture?

In grassroots organizing, strategy requires an understanding of the power dynamics and forces involved in decision making within the system one wants to change. So what drives pathologists and pathologists-in-training and how do we light a fire within our profession not to waste this opportunity that has been provided by health care reform to redefine our role within the patient care team? How do we nurture true patient advocates? I’ve been a little frustrated with these thoughts lately so please leave a comment with suggestions on how you think that we can accomplish these goals.

 

Chung

Betty Chung, DO, MPH, MA is a second year resident physician at the University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System in Chicago, IL.