Guest Post: Drone Transport of Specimens

On a hot afternoon in late September 2016 the Johns Hopkins Medical Drones team drove to a flight field in the Arizona desert with 40 vacutainer tubes filled with human blood obtained from volunteers. The individually wrapped tubes sat in two custom-designed white plastic cooler boxes which had wires coming out of one end, ventilation holes at the other, and ran off the drone’s battery power. We carefully placed one of the boxes on the drone, stood back, and flew the samples around for 260 kilometers in what seemed like an unending series of concentric circles. Great. But why would doctors be involved in this exercise?

For the last 3 years, the Johns Hopkins medical drones team has examined the stability of human samples transported via drone. Our approach has been similar for each study. Get two sets of samples, fly one on the drone, then take both sample sets back to laboratory for analysis to see if there are any changes. However, until this study in Arizona we had only flown these samples up to about 40km, in mild weather, and for up to 40 minutes at a time. A request to set up a drone network in a flood-prone area of a country in Southwestern Africa made us realize that we needed to repeat the stability tests in warmer weather and for longer flights. This drone network would serve clinics that were up to 50 km away from each other, therefore requiring round-trips of at least 100km. Once we received this request it became clear pretty quickly that our previous tests flying for to 40km were not good enough for an aircraft that would have to fly in a hot environment between several clinics that were each 50km away from each other.

After the 3-hour 260km flight, we took both sets of samples back to the Mayo Clinic laboratories in Scottsdale, Arizona and performed 19 different tests on the samples. Each pair of samples was compared to check for differences between the flown and not-flown sample sets. Although results from sample pairs were similar for 17 of the 19 tests, small differences were seen in Glucose and Potassium, which do also vary in other transport methods. We suspect the differences seen in this test arose because the not-flown samples were not as carefully temperature controlled as the flown samples in the temperature-controlled chamber. This study (which is the longest flight of human samples on a drone to date) shows that drones can be used for blood samples even for long flights in hot conditions. However, the temperature and other environmental variables must be well-controlled to keep the blood stable.

 

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-Dr. Timothy Amukele is an Assistant professor in the Department of Pathology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the Director of Clinical Laboratories at Johns Hopkins Bayview Hospital. He is also the Medical Director of two international research laboratories in Uganda and Malawi. He has pioneered the use of unmanned aerial systems (colloquially known as drones) to move clinical laboratory samples.

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-Jeff Street is an unmanned systems engineer and pilot at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine with more than 10 years of experience in the development of new and innovative vehicles. He is leading the Johns Hopkins aircraft development efforts for a wide range of medical cargo applications.

 

 

 

Here’s to Fresh STARTs: Sustainable Transitions And Reachable Targets

From the title, you might be able to tell that I’ve been busy on Lab Management University (LMU). Going through the online modules and lessons in the LMU certificate program I mentioned this past May, I’ve been able to hone several skills in interpersonal communication, resource management, and project leadership. (A worthwhile investment through ASCP which I highly recommend!) Another thing that’s kept me quite busy over the last two years has been Zika-virus and mosquito-related public health initiatives both inside and outside the laboratory. In a recent blog post, I discussed the correlation between measuring success in projects like these just as one would with common lab-centric goals. And, as a conclusion to that hard work, this will be my last directly-related Zika/public health post. Transitioning to the second half of medical school, I’ll be leaving behind a true grassroots project that not only reached countless people but has the promise to be sustainable after my departure from the island of Sint Maarten back to the states.

As with many times in life, I would say fresh starts are a welcome chance to reflect and grow upon things you might have learned or goals you might be closer to finishing. What has been made clear to me in my time working through classrooms, cases, exams, and projects is that the “jargon” we use as laboratorians is definitely worth its weight. It isn’t full of hollow charges for metrics and goals; it’s about real data and real solutions. Having the ability to apply my prior experiences in laboratory medicine throughout medical school—both inside and outside the classroom—has been an invaluable benefit. The general principles that guided my last blog post reflected simple goals (i.e. turnaround time compared with public health metrics) which utilize fundamental models of data collection, adjustment, and success. The essential model I described a few months ago is now a mainstay of a project that will continue to improve public health statistics slowly as time goes on.

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The model as it stands now consists of clear steps to identify problems which require interventions, highlight gaps in current practice, data collection from literature exists currently, collaboration with partners in a community of trust, and continuing those partnerships as improvements are made incrementally over time. The model has been repeated and successfully modified for these last two years from on-campus blood testing with procedural write-ups and data evaluation, to teaching school-aged children about mosquito prevention, to partnering with local government officials and having your projects adopted into their portfolio, and visiting individuals in their homes to discuss health and prevention.

To keep it brief, I’ve had an amazing experience here being able to lead and contribute to a wonderful and impactful project such as this. It has become increasingly clearer to me throughout this work that the values and skills programs like LMU teach are directly parallel with successes in various clinical settings. From the bedside to the laboratory to public health in the field, the lessons of how to effectively engage people and solve problems are critical. My time in laboratories before medical school, the daily grind of classwork here, and the projects I’ve been able to write about have all given me the space to try these skills on real situations—and hopefully that will make me the best clinician I can be after medical school is completed. Check out my “highlight reel” of partnerships, workshops, and active management in Zika prevention below.

Be sure to check back here next time, I’ll be writing from my hometown as I’ll explore ASCP’s Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL this coming September and report back on why it’s important to network and stay involved with our great professional community. Thanks for reading!

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Constantine E. Kanakis MSc, MLS (ASCP)CM graduated from Loyola University Chicago with a BS in Molecular Biology and Bioethics and then Rush University with an MS in Medical Laboratory Science. He is currently a medical student at the American University of the Caribbean and actively involved with local public health.

 

Planning Lab Testing for Medical Missions, Part 2

Last month I blogged about key points to consider when preparing to do lab testing in the field. Here I will expand on using point of care testing in medical missions. Point of care testing is easy to use and relatively easy to access, making it very attractive for use in the field or on medical missions. In fact, it is tempting to take these tests and go rogue – it’s not uncommon for point of care diagnostics to be obtained by non-laboratory professionals and tossed in luggage to be used by short-term medical teams. However, this is not in the best interest of the patients or the community. Helping establish point of care testing for medical missions is one very important way that a laboratory professional can get involved in this kind of outreach.

Proper utilization and quality assurance practices are just as critical in the outreach situation as at home in a large lab. Perhaps even more so; for example, in areas with high disease prevalence, false positives and negatives can significantly affect patient care and population health. Under-diagnosis due to false negatives means that those who need treatment might not get it, just as over-diagnosis due to false positives may cause patients to get unnecessary treatment. Unnecessary treatment, especially for infectious diseases, harms the community by contributing to drug resistance.

Most point of care tests, especially lateral flow tests, have built-in controls which lessens the need to run QCs with patient testing. However, it is important to know the limitations of the testing. Sometimes point of care testing systems that are not available in the United States are selected for use in outreach in foreign countries. It’s more likely that an American medical team would be unfamiliar with the tests. A laboratory professional can help establish or at least verify the validity of the tests, including limits of detection and accuracy, before they are deployed. Also, it is often helpful to have the results interpreted for the end user. Little interpretation is needed for the more straightforward qualitative tests that simply give a positive or negative result. Even with these tests, the limit of detection should be available to the provider, especially if this is significantly different from that which the provider is accustomed. Tests that involve titration, such as some of the rapid typhoid and syphilis testing, benefit from having an explanation of what the titers mean clinically available to the end user.

Other tests with results that are prone to confusion are point of care versions of assays more commonly performed in clinical laboratories. Difference in reference intervals for the POCT compared to a conventional test can be particularly confusing. For example, the results of a lateral flow point of care C-reactive protein assay have a different reference interval than results from high-sensitivity C-reactive protein assays used in clinical labs. Using the incorrect reference interval to determine whether a result is normal can lead to over- or under-treatment, which is contrary to the purpose of diagnostic testing. Yet, when using point of care tests in the field, there is not a neat little interpretive comment accompanying the result.

So, how can this be remedied? If the laboratory professional is also on the team, they can be available to provide information as needed. However, if the team is not so fortunate as to have their own laboratory professional, another way to provide the information is to provide a short guide to cheat sheet that briefly explains how to use test results.

Proper utility is also important, especially in areas with high burden of disease or in areas where there is no confirmatory testing. Consider rapid tests for H. pylori. These typically detect antibody to H. pylori, which can be found in up to 70% of asymptomatic populations. The rapid test is of little utility since positive results only indicate the presence of antibody and not necessarily an active infection. Consider using rapid screening tests, such as for HIV, when confirmatory testing is not available. Sometimes a second screening test that employs a different method than the first can be used as a confirmatory test if nothing else is available.

Consider environmental limitations of the testing when selecting tests for use in the field. Many tests are unreliable at extremes of temperature and humidity. This might not always be obvious even when quality controls are used properly. For example, Tang et al (1) showed that the effect of temperatures and humidity similar to what was experienced in Louisiana after Hurricane Katrina on quality control material for a POCT glucose meter system caused significantly depressed results. Also keep in mind that exposure to environmental extremes can reduce the shelf life of POCT and related reagents. If using POCT long term, it is good practice to routinely test a known standard – even on tests with built in quality controls such as the test line on lateral flow tests – to ensure there has not been degradation in quality due to the environment.

Preparing POCT for medical missions is a great way for a laboratory professional to get involved in global health and outreach. From helping to select appropriate tests, to verifying test validity, to teaching proper utilization of testing and providing interpretive guideline, the laboratory professional is a vital part of a medical mission – even if they never leave their lab!

  1. Tang CS, Ferguson WJ, Louie RF, Vy JH, Sumner SL, Kost GJ. Ensuring quality control of point-of-care technologies: effects of dynamic temperature and humidity stresses on glucose quality control solutions. Point of Care 2012;11:147-51.

 

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Sarah Riley, PhD, DABCC, is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Pathology and Immunology at Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine. She is passionate about bringing the lab out of the basement and into the forefront of global health.  

Planning Lab Testing for Medical Missions

I am frequently asked questions about establishing clinical lab testing in the field, or how to approach bringing lab tests on medical missions. There are three key questions that I always start with when planning diagnostic lab testing for any situation, and they are 1) what is the mission? 2) what are the needs of the population? and 3) what is the environment like?

The first question – what is the mission? – sets up the framework for the project. Is the goal to provide sustainable testing or to support a short term medical mission? An examples of sustainable testing would be establishing a new assay for permanent use in a clinic or hospital, and would require a plan for identifying and training operators, ensuring reagent availability and maintenance plans in-country, and a budget. Supporting a short term mission often requires only point of care testing. For this post, I’ll focus on supporting a short term mission.

The second question –what are the needs of the population? – helps determine a test menu. As with any diagnostic lab testing, it helps to ask the question “what are you going to do with the result?” when deciding which tests to offer. It is important to know what the medical care team is equipped to treat, what treatments are available in the community, and the cost of the treatment. It is important understand the prevalent health care issues that will be encountered by the care team on the mission. For example, if the goal of the medical mission is to provide routine healthcare to a remote environment, then you would want to know of any endemic diseases that the team would be prepared to treat. However, if the mission is surgical in nature, lab testing might need to address blood typing and viral testing, or perhaps coagulation testing.

The third question – what is the environment like? – guides the selection of testing platforms. If there will be electricity and running water, you will be able to use powered devices like a Piccolo chemistry analyzer, or platforms that require refrigerated reagents. Temperature extremes, especially heat, must be kept in mind. Many instruments can’t function over a certain temperature. A battery powered point of care instrument that is very useful in the field in moderate climates might be useless in high heat. For example, the Renal Disaster Relief Task Force of the International Society of Nephrology used the Abbott iSTAT in their response to the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. They found that this device often failed due to the extreme heat (>100 degrees F) of the field hospital environment (1). Improvisation can sometimes get around these limitations; I have used ice packs in coolers or even suitcases before to keep instruments cool enough to operate while in the field. Many times, especially for remote locations, lateral flow, whole blood based, point of care testing is the best option. There are many options available that do not require any special handling like refrigeration, and the ability to use capillary blood is a huge benefit in situations where venipuncture might be difficult.

In any situation you must know the sensitivity, specificity, cross reactivity, and limit of detection of the assays selected for the mission. You should be able to communicate any limitations to any of the care providers who might use the result. If the laboratory professional is not able to go on the medical mission, then another person should be identified as responsible for oversight of the laboratory testing. Most importantly, it is important to carefully plan for lab testing on medical missions. With thoughtful planning, adequate laboratory testing can be provided to support medical missions.

Reference

  1. Vanholder R, Gibney N, Luyckx VA, Sever MS. Renal Disaster Relief Task Force in Haiti earthquake. Lancet 2010;375:1162-3.

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Sarah Riley, PhD, DABCC, is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Pathology and Immunology at Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine. She is passionate about bringing the lab out of the basement and into the forefront of global health.  

 

 

Metrics, Goals, and Lab Leadership

In an April 2015 publication in Lab Manager, then ASCP President Dr. William Finn discussed the Lab Management University (LMU) program “designed to help pathologists and lab professionals take their laboratory management skills to the next level.” He also cited “gaps” in professional training and experience that revealed a lack of management skills in “pathologists, laboratory professionals, and pathology residents.” Utilizing advanced coursework available to them from LMU, laboratorians of various specialties would stand to benefit from this knowledge and effectively influence more positive outcomes for patients.

Within the last year, I’ve been writing about utilizing data from epidemiology, laboratory studies, and community partnerships in an integrated public health initiative combating mosquito-borne illness on the island of Sint Maarten. It is an ongoing multidisciplinary project I started which reaches various fields of study from immunological seroprevalence, to community health work, to social determinants of health, and team leadership and coordination. What started as a group of six students in the fall of 2016, has flourished into a team of now more than fifteen with partners in local government, local NGOs including the Red Cross, social and broadcast media, and our individualized message of local self-motivated disease prevention has reached well into the thousands.

Citing this experience as a process of a simple medical literacy proposal to an expansive public health initiative, I believe there are some significant advantages that being a laboratory professional can give you. Experiences during my time in clinical laboratories gave me many parallels to study as I became a leader of a dynamic and diverse program. Here is what I consider is a highly-oversimplified model for successful problem-solving, leadership, and ultimately measured success. As a common laboratory metric of efficiency/success—and something I have had experience with before—consider turn-around-time (TAT) as a problem many labs face. Compared to the problem of addressing risk reduction and source control for mosquito-borne illnesses like Zika, I found myself in the same model I had recognized many times before.

Example 1: Outside the Lab

Addressing Zika as a Public Health Concern

Example2: Inside the Lab

Addressing TAT as an Efficiency Metric

 

START: Clearly and Specifically Define the Problem or Need to be Addressed
With the advent of a local outbreak and information from local government regarding the increase of epidemiologic cases, behavioral change for risk reduction was highlighted as a major obstacle in improving public health outcomes. Creating self-sufficiency in the community would not only improve health but create sustainability. As a laboratory potentially signs on new clinics or accounts because of local changes in hospital structures, efficiency is being examined as workflow is slated to increase. Staffing, instrumentation, LIS/LAS, and other tools are being considered to reduce TAT and improve overall patient outcomes and strengthen quality control and quality assurance metrics.
Locate Potential Helpful Partners, Staff, or Tools that Can Assist Your Cause
To gain access to resources otherwise unavailable, it is imperative to collaborate with partners in the Ministry of Health as well as NGOs like the Red Cross. To reach communities most affected by the problem at hand, it is necessary to implement cultural liaisons to act as intercessors preserving the autonomy of individuals while creating a safe environment to communicate an effective public health message. As part of initial assessments to discover a clear problem, vendors may offer instrumentation or technology that would improve the conditions affecting the TAT. It would be highly prudent to reach out to the new accounts or clinical sites to determine if TAT is affected by workflow, personnel, communication, or procedural faults. Assessing the staffs’ skills and competency are also crucial for implementing corrective action.
Implement Initial Intervention, Paying Attention to Results Before/After
In the case of Zika virus education and prevention, initial interventions include utilizing community partners as liaisons to introduce us to targeted audiences/communities. Results should focus on the pre-and-post-survey data collected, referenced in earlier articles regarding engagement, knowledge, and behavior. In the case of TAT efficiency/improvement, initial interventions should include collecting data points regarding how specimen-to-result turnover is affected at every checkpoint while implementing changes as necessary. Data should indicate success in particular measures which improve TAT incrementally.
Take Measures to Make Further Interventions More Successful Along the Way
Educating communities about the risks associated with standing water and the spread of arboviral infections with clear demonstrations/examples of how to enact improvements. Distribution of educational or advertising materials throughout targeted areas will bolster an effective message. When staff or other changes effectively improve the streamlining process, they should be recognized and praised. Moreover, clients should be consulted in both inpatient and outpatient settings to inform procedural change and deter further external compromise of TAT.
Implement Follow-Up Intervention, Paying Attention to Results Before/After
Like before, interventions with Zika virus education include community partner meetings to hold engaging discussions about health promoting behavior. Similar surveys collect data before and after the presentation and are correlated with the previous meeting, however, with the addition of data regarding the effectiveness of secondary measures (i.e. advertising and educational materials). With the implantation of various measures to improve turnaround, assessments of protocol, instrument utility, effective transport, and other previously mentioned aspects would indicate successful outcomes. Combined with the supplemental consultation to steps both inside and outside of the laboratory, an comprehensive conclusion can be established to indicate a permanent solution via these metrics.
Conduct More Comprehensive/Translational Analysis of Intervention Effectiveness
Correlating the primary intervention with follow-up measures can indicate possible opportunities for further improvement. It can also highlight areas of significant success where interventions had the greatest impact. If significant enough, these results should promote the process and further the original cause set forth early on. Continuous metrics which analyze the TAT as a marker for productivity and efficiency before, during, and after interventions can offer insight into effective changes. Extrapolating this data can improve processes across departments and models made from this process can improve TAT and other metrics in a laboratory.
Share Significant Successes and Challenges with Partners/Staff and Share the Success
Based on standards in current literature, community partners benefit significantly from both repeat-visits as well as becoming involved and informed participants for positive change. As laboratories face staff shortages and personnel challenges, sharing the success and making sure the rewards are collectively appreciated can improve workplace dynamics.
Create a New Protocol, SOP, or Publication to Influence a New Standard
As with any successful public health interventions, shared information can lead to future improvements elsewhere. Publications often cite the process of creating a platform and approach to tackling social health concerns and highlights emphasize these positive outcomes. Many productivity projects in clinical settings are difficult, successes should be shared between departments and outside the laboratory. Ultimately, publication might present an ample opportunity for improving standings for overall hospital metrics and larger outcomes.
FINAL: Implement the Same Model Outlined Here for Potential Future Challenges

Obviously, this is a crude and generalized model for how to approach leadership both inside and outside the laboratory, but some of the key aspects of clear goals, interdisciplinary teamwork, resource management, and creativity are paramount. Having my laboratory experience was critical for finding success with my team here with our public health work. Laboratory professionals have strong skills and unique insights for a variety of important fields. Having that experience has truly enabled me to contribute in a meaningful way as I pursue my medical career. As you can clearly see, there are so many useful tools that apply across disciplines. Furthermore, the most important part of managing a project aimed at a positive outcome is answering the simple question: how do I utilize and interpret the data I collect along the way?

And here’s another question: who does data analysis better than us laboratory folks?

Thanks for reading, until next time…

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Constantine E. Kanakis MSc, MLS (ASCP)CM graduated from Loyola University Chicago with a BS in Molecular Biology and Bioethics and then Rush University with an MS in Medical Laboratory Science. He is currently a medical student at the American University of the Caribbean and actively involved with local public health.

Diagnostics for Displaced Populations

A few months ago, Sarah Riley discussed diagnosing disease in displaced populations. She says, “… being aware of the problem of limited access to diagnostic laboratory testing in refugee populations is a good start. We need to get a better understanding of the scope of the problem. We should be ready and able to provide specific recommendations for meeting diagnostic needs in these populations including most appropriate diagnostics…”

Dr. Riley’s post has stuck with me, and I wanted to know how I could help. While several organizations work with refugees worldwide, it’s unclear if any dedicate money to laboratories or diagnostics. Thankfully, there’s the ASCP Foundation‘s Global Health Fund. The GHF is dedicated to providing diagnostics, establishing laboratories, and training local personnel in countries where access to pathologists or medical laboratories is inadequate. If this sounds like something you’d like to support, you can do so here.

 

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-Kelly Swails, MT(ASCP), is a laboratory professional, recovering microbiologist, and web editor for Lab Medicine.

 

 

 

 

 

The Voice of Sint Maarten

It’s often difficult for a medical student to take time out of their schedule and work on projects in their community. Our free time is often encumbered with the “fire hose” of information that we all need to process and master before we sit for board exams. To be fair, there isn’t any free time per se. It is apparent (in medical school more than any other time I’ve known) that every minute of the time we schedule is, by choice, purposeful or not. With that noted, something exceptional happened this month in a span of three days that I am truly proud of. My “Z-Pack” Zika virus prevention initiative team all came together and tackled three extraordinary events around our Sint Maarten community.

If you’re just joining the Zika-related action, check out the background behind my work as well as some of the major accomplishments, achievements, and noteworthy lessons along the way this past year. My team’s work bridges a gap that exists between public health and the data we laboratorians acquire through diligent research.

The whirlwind of public health outreach events the Z-Pack was able to do were highly productive to the cause:

  • We have bolstered our public health and source reduction message on local radio, television, and print.
  • We have engaged and partnered with innumerable entities within this community and were an integral part of a mainstay annual health fair.
  • We engaged with local community members, not as students, but as public health liaisons fielding in-depth questions and addressing real concerns of the local population.
  • During these episodes, we were able to procure true data which we continue to collect, analyze, and use to formulate new approaches to positive health outcomes.

The first exciting development I listed was the debut into our media campaign. Being invited to the local radio to advertise our work and promote upcoming events was both exciting and reaffirming. In a short interview, I addressed Zika and other virus threats to the island community and discussed epidemiologic data and what it means in the scope of public health. Talking about our work alongside two of my team members and the project manager of the Ministry of Health’s vector control program was a thrill. A fellow team member and I were also fortunate enough to be flagged down by a local cable access television program to promote our work on a short video spot during our presence at the Lion’s Club Annual Health Fair I’ll discuss shortly. These media outlets reminded me of moments back in the laboratory when I had to present data clearly and field questions “on the fly.” Whether it was a staff meeting, educational resource assessment, or CAP inspection response, I couldn’t have been more prepared to handle the translational bridge from data to public view.

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Image 1: “Z-Pack” on the radio!

(Listen to the 16 minute radio spot here from PJD2 102.7FM/1300 AM The Voice of Sint Maarten)

I mentioned the Health Fair the local Lion’s Club sponsors each year, with booths that address a plethora of health education outlets from diet/nutrition, to diabetes, to (of course) mosquito reduction.  Partnering with our colleagues in the Ministry of Health we set up several tables in a tented booth and made available all kinds of educational resources for the public. There was a station designated to secondary interventions for combating mosquito risk reduction such as fogging guns and larvicides for standing water areas. I designed some clear-message flyers to distribute to patrons and others passing by our booth and was able to spark some interesting conversations with local community members and business owners who wanted more information—they wanted to distribute and display the same information in their offices and homes. Gaining popularity with the local community, we decided to record those interested parties and give them the title of “official community partners.” Not only will they feel more involved in the process of empowering and advocating for health for their community, but they will be motivated from within! I will say that my absolute favorite part of this health fair was the station our Ministry partners set up which included all their laboratory equipment they use to speciate, quantify, and analyze the local mosquito threat. This, alongside with our friends in local laboratory medicine who were collecting specimens to screen for Zika serologically, made this a very friendly environment for a laboratory professional like myself. You can bet I was happy to talk to visitors about epidemiology and risk reduction over a few microscopes!

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Figure 1: Clear-message informational flyers for public patrons to our booths at the health fair.
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Image 2: Health fair snapshots, a fogger gun, and some team building with microscopes.
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Figure 2: Preliminary data processing reveals an improvement in perceptions, attitudes, and behaviors toward Zika virus and overall arbovirus risk reduction.

On a more serious note, I want to speak briefly on the amazing opportunity that our community meeting offered for my team and I to learn some real truths about public health here on the island. With the success of partnering with laboratory services, research work in the field, and participating in a growing media campaign, the Z-Pack arranged a community meeting at a local religious center. Our “community meetings” as proposed in part from our earlier work focus on presenting audience and culturally specific information about reducing arbovirus risks and addressing health within the community. A community liaison connected us to a local Islamic center, where we conducted one of these meetings. Our presentation was received well, and a vigorous discussion followed. Having a partner from the Ministry of Health with us that day provided some clout to our discussions. I drew heavily on my interpersonal skills as a laboratorian when I fielded some really challenging questions from the adult crowd. Concerns in this particular community included specific objections to the effectiveness of the Ministry’s work on reducing mosquito populations, frustration over tourist-heavy areas receiving unfair attention, and true worry over improving health outcomes in a constructive and collaborative way. Taking the time to share their personal experiences was greatly appreciated by my team. Really engaging with the community on an individual level really makes it feel as though we are creating positive change. As a part of our work, data was collected on the effectiveness of our message. Still in its early stages, the data (Figure 4) shows qualitative improvements toward answers in post-presentation surveys which reflect new facts learned, potential for social/behavioral change, and establishment of health risk as a community priority.

 

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Constantine E. Kanakis MSc, MLS (ASCP)CM graduated from Loyola University Chicago with a BS in Molecular Biology and Bioethics and then Rush University with an MS in Medical Laboratory Science. He is currently a medical student at the American University of the Caribbean and actively involved with local public health.