Working With Baby Boomers: How Other Generations Can Adapt

Baby Boomers were for a long time to largest working generation in the workplace. They are slowly retiring and the next largest generation, Generation Y, is becoming the largest. However, Baby Boomers’ impact on the workplace is still profound and most organizations, if not all, are currently employing many Boomers. They are likely to be working in leadership roles and exert influence on many policies, procedures, systems, and organizational cultures.

Similar to Traditionalists, Baby boomers also appreciate face-to-face meetings. However, their preference for leaving and receiving voicemails is a lot higher than Traditionalists. They also appreciate social media more, especially as their children and grandchildren are using it. Baby Boomers utilize the internet more than Traditionalists and send text messages, even if they still prefer to talk over the phone instead of texting.

Working with Baby Boomers is all about the relationship. Establishing interpersonal connection should therefore be one of your main priorities when collaborating with someone from this generation. Because of the personal nature of their working style, it can sometimes take a few weeks (or longer) for decisions to be made. Calculate that in when working on a proposal or project. Baby Boomers appreciate formal presentations and a consensus-based process.

A Baby Boomers’ approach to leadership centers on incentives, data-driven decisions, and a democratic process. They typically are open to input from peers and their leadership style is friendly. They value receiving recognition, so any award or reward is appreciated and they will often display them publically. Because of their focus on interpersonal relationships, they do not respond to people who are not friendly and who indicate their hierarchy. Instead, make sure that they feel you are listening to them and including them. One way to do this is by taking notes and asking follow up questions.

Baby Boomers’ professional dream is continuing to be useful and productive in the workplace while feeling they are wanted and rewarded. If you want to increase your working relationship with Baby Boomers, connect with them on an interpersonal level by inviting them out to lunch and get to know who they are outside of the workplace. Provide them with positive affirmations, recognitions, and awards to make them feel they are a valued members of the organization and that they input and work is essential to producing results. Baby Boomers bring a lot of patients, experience, and knowledge and they help create and foster a team environment when they feel they are contributing members of the organization. Do not show impatience and question their ways of doing things openly. If you do need them to change something, include them in the process to make it a consensual and democratic process. Adding a Baby Boomer to a team can greatly improve the outcomes and success of that team.

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-Lotte Mulder earned her Master’s of Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 2013, where she focused on Leadership and Group Development. She’s currently working toward a PhD in Organizational Leadership. At ASCP, Lotte designs and facilitates the ASCP Leadership Institute, an online leadership certificate program. She has also built ASCP’s first patient ambassador program, called Patient Champions, which leverages patient stories as they relate to the value of the lab.


I’d like to tell you a story that happened at the ASCP Annual Meeting last October, 2018 in Baltimore.

Lotte Mulder and I presented a course on “Discovering Your Diversity Strengths” to about fifty people. Lotte is a Millennial and I am a Baby Boomer, and we’ve been working closely together for over three years on a daily basis. The presentation went really well and the audience was very participative and interactive. We talked about how different we were, how we complimented each other, and the value of human diversity in the workplace. 

At noon that day, we both participated in a Lunch Roundtable where the topic was Diversity in the laboratory. We quickly learned that those at our table had a strong interest and frustration about working with people from different generations. The focus was primarily on Millennials and Boomers. There were eight other people at our table and they each shared their frustration about working in the lab with either older or younger people.

This was a real opportunity for us to share the generational strengths and differences with each of these people. The Boomers seemed to think that the Millennials didn’t have a good work ethic. The more I asked questions of those in both generational groups, the more I was able to help them to share their opinions and/or frustrations. Most importantly, I made a point of asking each person what was important to them in the workplace.

The Millennials learned that the Boomers were “bred” to work beyond the expectations of their job. Most importantly, they found their identity in their work. This is one reason the “Boomer co-worker” delayed their retirement because of the fear of losing their identity.

The Boomers learned that the Millennials had a very good work ethic, they just valued work-life balance. It was actually Generation X that introduced work life balance to the workplace and the Millennials bought into the concept. The other strength of the Millennial is their passion for finding a purpose in their job.

By the time our hour was up, you could see the difference in how they related to each other. It’s amazing what education and awareness can do for people.

As a final note, the next day we co-taught a course on Stress Management. Wouldn’t you know it, we experienced the same situation at our “Stress Management Roundtable” lunch! It was fun to see how people began to see their co-workers through a different lens.

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-Catherine Stakenas, MA, is the Senior Director of Organizational Leadership and Development and Performance Management at ASCP. She is certified in the use and interpretation of 28 self-assessment instruments and has designed and taught masters and doctoral level students.  

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