CDC Press Release–Passenger Notification

CDC and Frontier Airlines Announce Passenger Notification Underway

On the morning of Oct. 14, the second healthcare worker reported to the hospital with a low-grade fever and was isolated. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirms that the second healthcare worker who tested positive last night for Ebola traveled by air Oct. 13, the day before she reported symptoms.

Because of the proximity in time between the evening flight and first report of illness the following morning, CDC is reaching out to passengers who flew on Frontier Airlines flight 1143 Cleveland to Dallas/Fort Worth Oct. 13.

CDC is asking all 132 passengers on Frontier Airlines flight 1143 Cleveland to Dallas/Fort Worth on October 13 (the flight route was Cleveland to Dallas Fort Worth and landed at 8:16 p.m. CT) to call 1 800-CDC INFO (1 800 232-4636). After 1 p.m. ET, public health professionals will begin interviewing passengers about the flight, answering their questions, and arranging follow up. Individuals who are determined to be at any potential risk will be actively monitored.

The healthcare worker exhibited no signs or symptoms of illness while on flight 1143, according to the crew. Frontier is working closely with CDC to identify and notify passengers who may have traveled on flight 1143 on Oct. 13.  Passengers who may have traveled on flight 1143 should contact CDC at 1 800-CDC INFO (1 800 232-4636).

 

Frontier Airlines Statement

 “At approximately 1:00 a.m. MT on October 15, Frontier was notified by the CDC that a customer traveling on Frontier Airlines flight 1143 Cleveland to Dallas/Fort Worth on Oct. 13 has since tested positive for the Ebola virus. The flight landed in Dallas/Fort Worth at 8:16 p.m. local and remained overnight at the airport having completed its flying for the day at which point the aircraft received a thorough cleaning per our normal procedures which is consistent with CDC guidelines prior to returning to service the next day. It was also cleaned again in Cleveland last night. Previously the customer had traveled from Dallas Fort Worth to Cleveland on Frontier flight 1142 on October 10.

Customer exhibited no symptoms or sign of illness while on flight 1143, according to the crew. Frontier responded immediately upon notification from the CDC by removing the aircraft from service and is working closely with CDC to identify and contact customers who may traveled on flight 1143.

Customers who may have traveled on either flight should contact CDC at 1 800 CDC-INFO.

The safety and security of our customers and employees is our primary concern. Frontier will continue to work closely with CDC and other governmental agencies to ensure proper protocols and procedures are being followed.”

Laboratory Testing in A High-Containment Facility

The team at Emory that cared for the patients infected with the Ebola Virus have published a paper on Lab Medicine about laboratory testing within a high-containment facility. You can read the entire paper on the Lab Medicine website.

Second Case of MERS-CoV in the United States

A second case of MERS-CoV has been confirmed in the United States. The patient lives and works as a healthcare provider in Saudi Arabia. The patient arrived in the US from Saudi Arabia on May 1st and presented to an Orlando, Florida emergency room with a fever and respiratory symptoms on May 8th. The patient experienced symptoms during his flights from Saudi Arabia to London, England; London to Boston, Massachusetts; Boston to Atlanta, Georgia; and finally, from Atlanta to Orlando, Florida. The CDC and local health officials are contacting travelers who may have come into contact with the infected patient. As with the case in Indiana, the patient’s family is voluntarily quarantining themselves at home. The patient is still hospitalized and in good condition.

MERS does not pose a risk to the general public. Evidence suggests that close contact with infected individuals—such as care givers—is needed for transmission. Because antiviral therapy or vaccines aren’t currently available, infection control procedures and rapid detection are our only weapons against MERS.

For more information about this virus, its appearance in the US, and specimen requirements from suspected cases, visit Lab Medicine’s MERS information page.

Edited to add: two healthcare workers who came in contact with the Florida patient have flu-like symptoms.

 

On the Lab Medicine Website

In case you’ve missed it, here is the table of contents for the current issue of Lab Medicine. New articles are uploaded regularly, so be sure to check back often.

Theoretical knowledge helps troubleshoot wonky results, but unfortunately that knowledge is easy to forget if it’s not used every day. If you’ve worked the chemistry bench long enough to have forgotten some of theory behind the analytes, check out this series of articles to refresh your memory.

In the latest edition of our podcast series, Dr. Alex Thurman walks listeners through diagnosing a new acute leukemia in the middle of the night.

MALDI-TOF podcasts

Recently Dr. Nate Ledeboer from the University of Wisconsin talked with Lab Medicine about the clinical applications of MALDI-TOF in the clinical microbiology laboratory. The first podcast discusses anaerobic identification and the second discusses the identification of mycobacteria and fungi.

If you’re interested in listening to more Lab Medicine podcasts, you can find them here and here. 

 

 

ASCP Call for Abstracts

Do you want to present your research at a national meeting? The American Society for Clinical Pathology is currently accepting abstract submissions for their Annual Meeting. This year it’s in October in Tampa, Florida. Soak up the sun while presenting your work and networking with your peers.