Win, Lose, or Draw?

In the 1962 Japanese release of King Kong vs. Godzilla, it was pretty easy to determine who the winner of the epic battle was (it was Kong, if you’re keeping track). Almost 60 years later, the two famous giant behemoths met again on the big screen, this time in an American version. This second battle, while fun to watch, had a less-obvious outcome. Those who sided with either monster had moments to cheer during the movie, but in the end, (spoiler alert!) a secondary issue overshadowed the much-hyped monster match. It seemed obvious to me that the script writers tried their best to satisfy audiences on both sides of the aisle. In doing this, however, the movie lost a little bit of its punch. That can happen in lab safety as well. If the message isn’t strong or clear, safety issues will ensue.

The lab manager noticed an increase in employee injuries on the job. Someone cut their finger on a microtome blade. Two different specimen processors splashed serum into their eyes. A night shift tech kneeled onto the floor to pick up a box, and her knee landed on broken glass that hadn’t been swept up. It was clear people were not paying close attention while they were performing their duties. The manager held a meeting in the lab to raise safety awareness. He delivered his message, but staff noticed he was chewing gum and that he did not put on a lab coat even though he was in the lab for over 20 minutes. The message was not clear. He said he was for a safer lab, but he didn’t look to anyone like he meant it.

Jake was new to the histology lab and he was excited to make a good impression as he began his career. During his departmental orientation, the supervisor stressed the importance of chemical safety. Formaldehyde and xylene were in use in the department, and they were potentially dangerous. Jake got the message and was ready to show the department he could work there safely. After orientation was done, Jake came to work to begin cutting tissue. When he sat down at his station, he opened the drawer for supplies and saw a packet of oatmeal a spoon, and a coffee cup. The medical director came in to the lab to welcome Jake, and he noticed she was drinking tea. The message Jake received about safety was no longer clear. The supervisor spoke about safety, but it was clear no one enforced it.

When the message we send to staff about lab safety is mixed, we really can’t blame them when the culture is bad. The problem is that many leaders are not aware they are sending this confusing communication. If you’re not sure if you are one of those leaders, take a step back and look in the mirror. What kind of message do you send? Do you support safety? Do you do it with your words AND your actions? What sort of example do you set?

If you’re not in lab leadership, you still have a responsibility to represent safety with your lab practices as well. Everyone has an impact on the overall safety culture, not just leaders. What do you do to promote safety in your department?

Maybe you are an employee and it’s your leader who is sending mixed messages. First, make sure you’re choosing the side of safety in your work no matter what others are doing. Second, it may be time to “manage up” and ask leadership why certain unsafe practices occur. If the leader is part of the problem, it is acceptable to point that out, provided you do so with purpose, tact and professionalism.

Leading by example for safety is vitally important no matter your role in the department. Choose your side, stick to it in all circumstances, and over time you will be able to be declared the decisive winner. Those mixed safety messages usually lead to a draw, or worse, a loss for the team. 

Because I have been a Godzilla fan for decades, I thoroughly enjoyed this latest film entry. In truth, I was able to discern a clear winner of his fight with Kong despite the writer’s intentions, but that may be because I had support for my favorite going in. That might be your way to victory as well. Root for “Team Safety,” and your support will be noticed and followed for the win!

Dan Scungio, MT(ASCP), SLS, CQA (ASQ) has over 25 years experience as a certified medical technologist. Today he is the Laboratory Safety Officer for Sentara Healthcare, a system of seven hospitals and over 20 laboratories and draw sites in the Tidewater area of Virginia. He is also known as Dan the Lab Safety Man, a lab safety consultant, educator, and trainer.

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