Pathology and Histology Services Being Developed at the Biamba Marie Mutombo Hospital (HBMM), Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)

Dikembe Mutombo Foundation

The Dikembe Mutombo Foundation (DMF) was created by NBA Legend Dikembe Mutombo in in 1997 with a mission to improve the health, education, and quality of life for the people in his homeland, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire).

It took 10 years of intense work and many challenges but in December 2007, the Biamba Marie Mutombo Hospital named in memory of Dikembe’s mother opened its doors to patients in the capital city of Kinshasa, DRC. Dikembe personally contributed more than $23 million to build and equip the hospital. The total cost of the new hospital was $29 million.

The hospital currently has close to 170 beds with an ultimate future capacity of 300 beds. It is a modern facility with state-of-the-art equipment including a new donated CT scanner (the first in the DRC.) This general hospital has the following traditional services: primary care, internal medicine, pediatrics, surgery, OB-GYN, surgical subspecialties such as neurosurgery, orthopedics, urology, and ENT. The goal for the hospital is to provide quality care and to train a cadre of health professionals who in turn will continue to build capacity in the health institutions of the country. Hospital management espouses the following values: respect for the dignity of the patients, professionalism, continuous quality improvement, transparency, and accountability. Currently, the hospital is the most modern, if not the best in the country and to date it has treated close to 500,000 patients.

In 2017, Dikembe Mutombo was honored by the Harvard University Medical School for his ongoing humanitarian efforts and dedication to health care during the Global Health Catalyst Cancer Summit in Boston. The three-day summit, hosted by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and Harvard Medical School, brought together African ambassadors, ministers of health, celebrity cancer advocates and global health stakeholders to discuss cancer and examine its global effects on society.

Background

In 2016, the Dikembe Mutombo Foundation successfully implemented a Women’s Oncology Institute at the Biamba Marie Mutombo Hospital (BMMH) in the capital city of Kinshasa. Using classic bedside and surgical teaching methodology, aided by low-cost telecommunications technology, and wise infrastructure investments, the Friends of Africa, Inc. (led by Dr. Groesbeck Parham) has been able to successfully build effective, Congolese-led programs for the early detection and treatment of female cancers at BMMH, thereby providing public access to these critical life-saving services for the first time ever in the DRC. Widespread access to such services is known to result in significant alterations in cancer death rates.

Several months ago, the hospital purchased a new ultrasound machine from GE Healthcare to aid in evaluating breast and abdomino-pelvic abnormalities for the female cancer patients.

Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Treatment Clinic

·     A new Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Treatment Clinic was opened at BMMH in July 2016, under the leadership of the Congolese healthcare providers that were trained in Zambia by Dr Groesbeck Parham.

·     During opening week 8,800 women requested cervical cancer screening services and 3,000 were accommodated

·     To date (July 2016-November 2017), the clinic has screened over 15,000 women for cervical cancer, the largest number ever reported in the DRC.

·     Almost 1,000 women (1 out of every 14 screened) were found to have cervical pre-cancer, all of whom were treated on the same day (the largest number ever reported in the DRC), using modern outpatient techniques.

Through intensive, quarterly, hands-on training demonstrations held at BMMH, a team of board-certified U.S. gynecologic oncologists from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, successfully trained a local cadre of Congolese gynecologists to safely and effectively treat women diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer using oncologic surgical procedures. This novel form of competency-based surgical training was developed in Zambia and is specifically designed to rapidly build surgical proficiency in resource-constrained settings, based on the principles of “Deliberate Practice”, intense replication, and mental narration of a limited repertoire of surgical procedures. 

Using an approach tailored specifically for training surgeons in resource-constrained environments, a team of U.S., board-certified breast surgical oncologists from the University of Arkansas (led by Dr. Ronda Henry-Tillman) successfully trained local Congolese general surgeons to safely and effectively perform surgical procedures that are fundamental to the modern treatment of breast cancer. The training approach was identical to the one used to train gynecologists to perform cervical cancer surgery. To date 81 patients with breast cancer have been treated with surgery by the newly trained team of Congolese general surgeons, under the tutelage of U.S. breast surgical oncologists. All surgeries have taken place in the newly formed Breast Cancer Surgical Unit at BMMH.

In summary, the following has been accomplished:

  1. Developed a local Congolese workforce that has the capacity to provide modern, high quality cervical and breast cancer early detection, diagnostic and treatment services, and to train others
  2. Established two new female cancer (cervix and breast) specialty clinics at BMMH
  3. Established two new female cancer (cervix and breast) surgical units at BMMH
  4.  Leveraged web-based videoconferencing (Skype, Zoom) technology to facilitate continued education and develop an international women’s oncology community of practice, made up of Congolese, Zambians and Americans.
  5. Implemented a women’s oncology data collection system
  6. Designed culturally appropriate health promotion messages
  7. Initiated a cervical cancer prevention outreach program

 Women’s Oncology Care for Africa, known as WOCA. They are the visiting breast and cervical cancer team from the U.S.

Dr. Michael Hicks (L), gynecologic oncologist consultant from Detroit, Michigan, and Dr. Alex Mutombo Baleka (R) from Kinshasa, DRC, performing the first radical hysterectomy ever at BMMH in Kinshasa on a woman recently diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer during a cervical cancer screening program sponsored by the Dikembe Mutombo Foundation and supported by UNFPA.

Pathology and Histology

Histology is the next step that the HBMM hospital is working on establishing. This will provide a needed tool for a more complete diagnostic picture for better patient care. Presently, the hospital is working with 2 different Pathologists to help establish the diagnostic part of the Pathology lab. This is where I have come in to help the Pathologist develop their histology lab needs at BHMM. On my first trip over the hospital selected a team of medical techs to be the core of the histology lab. July 2019, I spent 3 weeks giving formal histology lab classes, organized our equipment and lab area, and started some initial hands-on training on basic histology procedures. On Feb 27th, 2020, I return to the DRC for my second trip to the HBMM hospital. The trip started on the 27th of Feb. in San Jose, Costa Rica. I spent parts of 2 days in Atlanta at the Mutombo Foundation picking up 2 donated microtomes and a double headed microscope to take over for the lab. My first task was to review my previous classroom teachings and spent more time on performing laboratory techniques. With the equipment we now have in the lab we were able to do some valuable training. We worked on tissue embedding, microtome sectioning, floatation bath pickup of the thin cut specimen tissues, and general good laboratory practices with the Pathology Lab. (photos)  Additionally, I was able to spend time visiting and training other histology groups in Kinshasa. I spend one day giving classes at the University of Kinshasa, in the Pathology Dept., to a hand full of Histologists from 4 different labs within the city of Kinshasa. My focus of visiting and presenting classes to those outside of the HBMM hospital was to educate the local labs more about basic histology, to help them to start networking to help each other, and for me to find out the available histological resources within the community. All this will not only help our present histology setup at the HBMM, but it will help the others develop better lab uniformity and quality to help each lab’s patients. We are still short a few things at the HBMM to get histology up and running. We would like to have the lab operational on our next trip to Kinshasa. We had projected the opening of Histology for July – Aug. 2020.  However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic and travel restrictions this timeline may not be met. We are still hoping for the histology\pathology lab opening at HBMM in 2020.

I would like to thank Dr. Dan Milner and Ms. Alpa Pandya from ASCP for their instrumental help in making this lab project possible. This is not the first time they have assisted me overseas and I hope it is not our last program to jointly help.  Additionally, I would like to thank Susan Johnson, Executive Director at DMF in Atlanta, GA, for her tireless support. She made sure everything came together for me. This included the obtaining (twice) a visa for me for the DRC.  This visa was not an easy task, especially for someone living in Costa Rica without a DRC Embassy in all Central America. Last, but of course not the least by any means, I would like to thank the Mutombos for their generosity and compassion for helping the medically underserved people of the Congo.

Each trip I have done overseas that I have provided teaching, basic or IHC lab setups, or fine-tuning of histology labs have all been different, but always rewarding. Just to note, many any of these trips I have done with the support of ASCP. I hope this article stimulates others to go out and help others. We all have something to offer. Please share your knowledge with others who many do not have the opportunities that you have been given. Do not let borders or languages be a deterrent. Remember, everything is possible if approached correctly.

The grounds at Biamba Marie Mutombo Hospital, Kinshasa, DRC.
A portion of one histology class.
Teaching in the lab at HBBM.

-David J. Davis BS, HT(ASCP)QIHC is a certified Histologist and has his qualification in immunohistochemistry with ASCP.  He has been a histologist for the past 38+ years. He has worked in various capacities in 26 countries around the world. Since 1992 he’s been teaching and assisting the international community in histology. He’s retired, but definitely not finished working.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.