Working with Generation Y: How Other Generations Can Adapt

Generation Y is coming and they are coming in strong! It is fast becoming the world’s largest working generation and their impact on the workforce will become even clearer in the next few years. These digital natives find communication natural, in any shape or forms it comes. They prefer texting and instant messaging, but also appreciate face-to-face meetings and hand-written notes. They use social media for both personal and professional use and consider it essential to know how and where to access information. Instant gratification has become one of this generation’s key values, because they grew up with the world of information at their fingertips. They value professional development and feedback and they are at work to learn and grow.

When working with a Millennial the first step is to show them that you respect them and what they bring to the table. This generation has received more negative attention than other generations, but they have a tremendous amount to offer to the workplace (as do all the other generations). They value collaboration and learning opportunities, so they are typically quick to adjust when giving constructive feedback. Because of their collaborative approach, they value inclusion and Social Media to bring people together. They are well versed in finding information and can typically solve smaller technological issues without any help.

This generation is focused on having their work mean something, to have a purpose that is larger than simply getting a paycheck. They dislike long email and voicemails and anything that is a waste of paper. They appreciate flexibility and sending documents electronically. They experiences high academic pressures, so they are comfortable working in a fast-paced environment. They are comfortable multitasking and handling multiple projects simultaneously.

Millennials who work in larger organizations are on the brink of entering leadership positions. However, there are many self-starters who have had to learn leadership skills along the way. Because this generation values collaboration, leaders tend to encourage group work and giving people an acknowledgement for trying. They dislike people who are afraid or do not want to learn new technology and cynicism as they are a generally very positive generation.

When working with Millennials, note that they respond well to a participation work environment so ask for their input and suggestions. Be open about any processes, systems, and share information freely. Provide them with lots of feedback to help them learn and grow. Millennials respond well to a faster pace work environment, so do not try to slow them down. They dislike formality and stiffness, so allow flexibility whenever possible. For example, invite them to provide input for their own goals and do not hover over them. Give them multiple things to work on simultaneously so that they can go from project to project when their energy shifts. This generation is crucial to bring your organization to the next level, so mentor them, help them grow and develop and you get their dedication, passion, collaboration, and positivity in return.

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-Lotte Mulder earned her Master’s of Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 2013, where she focused on Leadership and Group Development. She’s currently working toward a PhD in Organizational Leadership. At ASCP, Lotte designs and facilitates the ASCP Leadership Institute, an online leadership certificate program. She has also built ASCP’s first patient ambassador program, called Patient Champions, which leverages patient stories as they relate to the value of the lab.


What’s the purpose? That’s the question that most Gen Ys, or commonly known as Millennials, ask of their job. Why am I here? Can I make a difference in the world if I remain doing what I am doing?

The Baby Boomers worked because they felt an obligation to put in a hard day’s work whether they liked doing what they were doing or not. It was a job. The Generation Xers introduced a focus on work-life balance, which was not the case for the Baby Boomer. The Boomers never heard of the concept of “work-life balance” until their children, the Gen Xers, made it a job requirement and reality.

As for the Millennials, they need to really believe in their job and what they are doing. Millennials ask questions that the Boomers and Gen Xers wouldn’t think of asking. This is often misinterpreted as being lazy or looking for the easy way out. This is not the case. The Millennials took the best of their predecessors. Most Millennials have a good work ethic and they definitely look for balance. However, they’re also searching for a purpose.

My favorite story of a Millennial is centered on the importance of taking lunch at work. This topic surfaced from a Roundtable Discussion with laboratory professionals last October 2018, at the ASCP Annual Meeting in Baltimore. The actual topic for this Roundtable Discussion was “diversity.” However, that quickly changed when the nine people at the Roundtable focused on generational differences. This roundtable was rich in generational diversity. The table was comprised of Boomers, Gen Xers and Millennials. Boomers stated that they found it both necessary and easy to work through lunch. Why? It’s because they pride themselves in their incredible work ethic. The Boomers praised themselves for being better than “most Millennials” who often don’t and won’t work through lunch. Instead of that mindset, perhaps the better approach would be “What can we learn from Millennials in the work place?” That answer is “purpose and balance.”

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-Catherine Stakenas, MA, is the Senior Director of Organizational Leadership and Development and Performance Management at ASCP. She is certified in the use and interpretation of 28 self-assessment instruments and has designed and taught masters and doctoral level students.  

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