LDTs: Public Perception

It seems like everyone is getting into the act these days, related to the regulation of laboratory developed tests (LDTs). Even politicians and lawyers are talking about LDT regulation. A recent online post (http://thehill.com/policy/healthcare/211250-lawmakers-push-fda-oversight-of-lab-tests) reported that several lawmakers are now writing to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), asking it to quickly approve the FDA’s guidance document for FDA regulation of LDTs, in order to protect the public from the depredations of the evil lab people developing tests that will harm the public. That last clause is my paraphrase of course, but is not that far off what the post actually says.

The harm in posts like this is that the general public, including lawmakers and politicians, have no understanding of the laboratory field in general, and definitely no understanding of the regulatory environment that all reputable labs operate under. The majority of hospital labs and big reference labs are accredited and operate under the regulations of an accrediting agency including such agencies as CMS, CLIA, various State regulatory bodies, CAP and The Joint Commission. The combined regulations of these agencies result in labs which not only produce test results using good laboratory practice, but when these labs develop tests (LDTs) they do so meeting many regulatory standards already. FDA oversight of these labs is overkill, in my opinion.

Where FDA oversight of LDTs would be useful is in the plethora of start-up companies offering the public a variety of tests to diagnose disease, monitor their health, or determine their genetic code. Many of these labs have no accreditation and have used LDTs as a loophole for bypassing FDA regulation of their tests. In fact it’s likely that many of them are in need of regulation from some agency.

John Q. Public in general is just beginning to understand what a lab test is. He has no idea that he should be looking for an accredited lab, and asking for some sign that minimum standards were used to develop tests. He simply Googles his symptoms and gets 4 million options for lab tests he can have run to diagnose his disorder. Laboratory professionals have an obligation to try harder to educate the public. We need to be involved and be visible. FDA regulation of laboratory tests is a “hot” issue currently that is being picked up by the public. We should take every opportunity to set the record straight.

 

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-Patti Jones PhD, DABCC, FACB, is the Clinical Director of the Chemistry and Metabolic Disease Laboratories at Children’s Medical Center in Dallas, TX and a Professor of Pathology at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.

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