The Utility of the RISE…Or Not…

So, that time of year is now again upon us…the Resident In-Service Exam, aka the RISE. Even though this test is meant to assess our knowledge of what we’ve learned thus far, the competitive natures that have brought to this point in our careers push us to do well on it. We feel an impulse, regardless of whether we act on it or not, to cram some knowledge into our brains at the last minute for a test that we are told we are not supposed to study for. This is quite a paradoxical conundrum.

But just how much does it really test? We are graded on percentiles in comparison to others in our year taking the RISE. But there are those rumors we all have heard, of programs that have remembrance databases or have year-long RISE specific lectures or students taking the test at home unproctored…so how much of our scores are true measures versus our peers if we don’t have access to these things?

Additionally, there is the other question: just how relevant is the RISE? Rinder et al. published the article “Senior RISE Scores Correlate with Outcomes of the American Board of Pathology Certifying Exams” in 2011, but how much of their findings truly are tied to our RISE scores and how much to our inherent study habits and test taking skills? These questions may be even more apropos at this time when there is a stronger recognition that we need to develop curricula to teach true competency and not just the ability to pass standardized tests. So yet again we are confronted with this question of just what does true competency mean and how do obtain it?

For me, the competency that I want to gain means possessing the ability and confidence to practice with very little supervision the day after I finish my studies and get a job. For some, this may be directly after residency and for the majority of us, after fellowship(s). So do you believe that the RISE helps us to pinpoint our weaknesses or really doesn’t help us much on our journey to competency? Does it help predict whether we will pass the AP and/or CP boards or is just a meter of our test taking ability? As a second year resident at a program where we do not, to my knowledge, have any of those aforementioned aids, I’m not so sure that I can answer these questions. All I know is that I’m still not done taking day-long standardized tests.

So, do you feel that the RISE is useful? Why or why not?

 

Chung

Betty Chung, DO, MPH, MA is a second year resident physician at the University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System in Chicago, IL.

 

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