Balance Between Service Obligations and Education

These past couple of days I attended the CAP Residents Forum and USCAP in San Diego. It was both an inspiring and daunting experience. Inspiring because of the breadth and depth of research and amount of scholarly expertise in the room every time I attended a lecture; daunting because of this same fact and also because of the reminder that someday soon I will need to be as expert and competent as these speakers.

With these thoughts in mind, I attended the first half of the morning of the CAP Residents Forum for their “Dating Game” panel where new-in-practice and veteran pathologists spoke about to getting and keeping your first job. It was actually an engaging panel and I learned practical information that was new to me and that will help me not only to obtain my first job but also when I apply for fellowship in a couple of months.

I attended mostly molecular pathology talks and the cytology short course that for someone who hasn’t had cytology yet, was informative. I got to hang out with friends from other programs that I met through the CAP Residents Forum and to hear how they are taught the practice of pathology. These conversations got me to thinking about whether service obligations can compromise our education.

For someone who is CP-oriented, I am at a program that is heavy on the surgical pathology (we do 17 months; previous classes did many more). And most of us are trained at academic institutions but my program also has rotations at a VAhospital and two community private practice hospitals. Life is different at the community hospitals but I hear that most residents will go on to practice in this type of setting. The volume can be high, there may be many tumor boards/conferences to present at or attend, and the turnover time is so strictly adhered to that you might not always be able to get protected preview time – even if eventually you do get to sign-out with the attendings after they’ve verified a case.

But does it matter about protected preview time if you don’t look at the verified diagnosis before you sign out with your attending? Does your program have CP residents covering autopsy call? Do your residents gross on Saturdays? Just what constitutes service obligations interfering with resident education in your perspective? Working in a clinical setting, patient safety and service obligations can take on a predominant role, but the quality of our work cannot suffer. So what makes for the right balance between service obligations and resident education and what can we do to ensure that resident education is made a priority?

 

Chung

Betty Chung, DO, MPH, MA is a second year resident physician at the University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System in Chicago, IL.

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