Chutes and Ladders

Mobility in any career can lead you in multiple directions and usually it is up to you which way you go. The laboratory field has become very specialized in the last twenty years and staying a true generalist or a general supervisor is becoming more difficult. I always tell students to stay generalists as long as possible so that your options are open once you get a sound technical foundation of knowledge. This allows them to become supervisors in a number of different areas when the time comes. Much discussion has been made about the proverbial “career ladder” and whether or not the ladder exists as it used to. As an early careerist I am well versed in navigating the ladder and figuring where I fit, and how I plan to climb the rungs as I enter my second decade of my career. I finished my MBA at the beginning of 2013 and put myself into application mode to see what new positions awaited me.

I learned a few things in my quest to climb as many rungs as I could on the ladder. First, if an application states you need a certain amount of experience but you are one or two years short, apply anyway. Employers will at least speak with you if you are a little short. If you wow them with your experience so far in your career and let them know that you don’t just work but you actively observe you can make up that deficit. Second, do not be afraid of lateral moves. If your goal is to be a laboratory director or higher, moving to supervise a different area of the lab can make you a better-rounded candidate once it comes time to go for that higher position. This is especially important if you have become burned out or in need of a change from your current department. Nothing says you have to stay a Hematology supervisor for eight years before you have the supervisory experience to become a laboratory manager/director. One aspect of the lab I find is a good move is to the point-of-care side of the lab. You get out of the lab more and into the hospital as a whole. Usually this role takes on the Quality side of things as well. This role can be a great transition from a technical supervisor to a more general department supervisor where you can learn and grow.

Finally, never be afraid of putting in an application. I find a lot of people talk themselves out of a position before they even apply. Do not be afraid of rejection. In speaking with laboratory professionals, I have heard of a hospital not hiring a candidate for a position but going back and contacting them at a later date for a different position. It never hurts to interview and get your name and face out there. Go on interviews even if you don’t feel the position is a good fit. Practice is the name of the game. When your time comes climb the ladders and avoid those chutes!

Herasuta

Matthew Herasuta, MBA, MLS(ASCP)CM is a medical laboratory scientist who works as a generalist and serves as the Blood Bank and General Supervisor for the regional Euclid Hospital in Cleveland, OH.

One thought on “Chutes and Ladders”

  1. What career advice would you give a 53-year-old just entering the field? I’m starting with an A.S. MLT degree, and wanting to get a B.S. in MLS after that (I was previously a credentialed Veterinary Technician).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s