Engage Yourself to Transform Our Profession

It’s never too early to be an engaged pathologist-in-training. This means that we must understand our past and have a strong vision of the future we hope to shape. We must evaluate the forces that have influenced the role and perception of our profession within society, what we did or didn’t do in the past that has led us to our current status, and not only what things we would like to change but also to what do we want to change them.

Since I have an advocacy and organizing background, I may look at our profession a little differently than other residents. First, we are a small profession. The majority of medical students do not choose to become pathologists. But I believe that may be due to at least in part, to a lack of commitment to nurture our pipeline. There is no national medical student organization for those who are interested in learning more about pathology as a profession, and often the little exposure that medical students do get is not an accurate representation of what they would do during residency and ultimately, in the working world.

It’s never too early to be an engaged pathologist-in-training. This means that we must understand our past and have a strong vision of the future we hope to shape.

Secondly, we are still more discohesive (and I’m not talking about a lymphoma here) than we should be as a profession. This may partly be due to the diverse nature of our profession where AP and CP are all considered pathology. In many Asian or European countries, pathology residents must choose one track or the other; they, more times than not, do not have the option for combined AP/CP. So does this confuse or hurt us to educate our future pathologists in this manner where allegiances are often diluted? I say no, not directly. But since we do have so many subspecialties, and consequently, subspecialty organizations, many residents and pathologists who are limited in terms of time and energy have to choose and prioritize which organization to devote their efforts. Even though we have ASCP and CAP as more all-encompassing organizations, we could still have stronger solidarity and more frequent interactions between these groups.

Thirdly, from my n=1 (level 3 evidence which isn’t always worth much), most residents and attendings I see have very little interest or experience in political advocacy even though this may be the greatest avenue we have for palpable change. I have seen some committed to curricular reform. I have also seen some who promote the profession by serving on hospital and program committees as well as leadership in state and national societies. But what I don’t see much of are those who keep track of what is going on in DC and within society that affects our profession and who attempt to do something to change what they perceive as negative. We need to change our culture and encourage and train our residents to get involved early in such activities.

And last, but not least, we need to own our value as physicians. We must not allow anyone to treat as us less than a physician from another specialty. And practice makes perfect–we as residents should start early by serving on organizational committees, etc. I will be doing my part this weekend serving on the CAP Council on Education (COE). I’ll let you know how that goes.

As an aside, creating an organization to educate medical students about pathology is a pet project of mine. If you’re interested in helping to start such an organization where we can also serve as mentors to pathology residents-to-be, please feel free to email me at bchung73@uic.edu.

Chung

Betty Chung, DO, MPH, MA is a second year resident physician at the University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System in Chicago, IL.

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