Are Pathologists and Primary Care Physicians Ready for the Genomic Era and Personalized Medicine?

I was reading about the FDA’s recent crackdown on 23andme to stop marketing their saliva based whole genome testing and interpretation service. Rather than resist, 23andme decided to comply and is currently in “talks” with the FDA so that they can complete the process for FDA validation and again begin to market their kits and testing. For now, they can continue to provide their genealogy testing and whole genome sequencing without interpretations.

Currently, in some academic research centers, whole genome or exome sequencing via next generation sequencing (NGS) methods is utilized on a limited basis by researchers and clinicians to identify pathogenic mutations. NGS and bioinformatic analysis methods continue to steadily improve and costs have been decreasing. However, there are limitations and barriers to widespread use at this point. These include but are not limited to: 1) widely used databases such as the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD) and the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) still only contain information that only covers a fraction of the human genome, 2) more research is still needed to identify more variants mutation-disease associations, and 3) most mutations identified fall under the category of “unknown clinical significance”.

Tools such as NGS, despite its improvement over previous technology, still cannot identify large deletions or copy number variations (CNV) and is a technology not accessible, cost-wise and support-wise, to most health care institutions. Despite all of this, primary care physicians, even now, still may be confronted with patients who bring them their genomic screening results, whether obtained from commercial services provided by companies like 23andme or through molecular testing through a health care institution. But today’s physicians, including primary care physicians and pathologists, were not trained in medical school to understand how this testing is performed or the significance of these results. But the time is coming, and maybe sooner than we realize, when we will have to deal with such testing on a daily basis.

So, it is imperative that we train our doctors and doctors-in-training now to be ready for when that time comes. But, my question this week is “How should we go about it?” Additionally, who should compose the health care team to provide guidance and counseling to patients once results are available? And who should regulate how testing should be done and what information should be included in results reporting? Leave me a comment if you have an opinion or any ideas.

Chung

Betty Chung, DO, MPH, MA is a second year resident physician at the University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System in Chicago, IL.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s