Passions and Pitfalls as an International Consultant, Part II: What Works and What Doesn’t

 

As I reflect on the huge impact 9-11 had on our country, one of the things that speak of who we are as a nation is the concept of Global Health. Even in the strife of conflict, there is never compromise when it comes to humanitarian assistance, and work continues toward peaceful ways to make the world a better place. Once again I am reminded that strengthening and building laboratory capacity around the globe is making a major contribution to the healthcare of nations around the world.

There are passions and pitfalls to consulting in healthcare internationally. Some tactics work well, some don’t—and I have a few short personal examples to share. What typically “doesn’t work” are the smooth and precise operational processes we tend to be familiar with in our lives and laboratories.

“The best laid plans of mice and men do often go astray” and indeed, that happens each and every project I am privileged to participate in. Expecting things to change is the norm, and no matter how carefully planned, the trip never goes as planned!

Each project has it’s “pitfalls”—and they are sometimes concerning, often funny, and always require a huge amount of “go with the flow flexibility.”On one trip we were scheduled to assess seven laboratories scattered throughout a very large geographic area. The hours and hours of driving took so much time, performing thorough assessments was quite a challenge. Providing the very best feedback possible was difficult to accomplish and there were several sleepless nights working over reports and comparing notes. That meant nodding off in a very hot car….and missing the warthogs!! On another trip we were scheduled to assess and offer accreditation feedback to a comprehensive specialty laboratory. It fell to us to spend several days in their new and very modern facility and walk through their processes. As the week progressed we found our assessment team was “in the middle” of a conflict in the stakeholders’ goals and our closing sessions with the laboratory leadership took a fair amount of diplomatic energy to stay focused on the laboratory assessment findings. In this case, experience in cultural differences, being able to read the nuances of unspoken sensitivities, and even the ability to maintain meeting and agenda control were essential skills. If this one had been my “first rodeo” it would have been a disaster!

But what about those things that go as planned? In my experience one thing that always goes well is the receptivity. I have worked on first time visits to new countries and also in the same country multiple times. Without exception I have been welcomed by laboratory and health professionals who are anxious to share information and exchange operational methods and expertise. In all cases they are proud of their laboratories, and eager to show what they do and how they do it. One of the “passions” and something that works very well are the connections with people. We all live, love, want the best for our families, and want meaningful and purposeful work to do in the world. The relationships I have developed over the years are priceless. On one trip my ASCP teammate and I were invited to the rural home of our in-country colleague, and the elder of the family presented us with a parting gift—a chicken! It is traditional to honor guests who are traveling with something to eat along the way so they don’t suffer hunger on their journey….and after a lengthy explanation about why the airlines wouldn’t allow us to take our chicken home, we asked if our host might keep her for us so she could raise many chicks and honor many other guests in the future.That seemed an acceptable compromise, so we named our chicken “Elao” which is the native word for “Lucky”. Poetic irony, but we hope Elao went on to make a bit of history.

Every trip has moments that work well and some not so well, but one constant is “adventures in travel.” Next time I’ll share some stories about my challenges with luggage…and some crazy adventures in strange airports. By the way, if you are ever in Ondangwa, Namibia please order something other than chicken—and if you see Elao the Famous Chicken running around, be sure to contact me at bsumwalt@pacbell.net!!

-Beverly Sumwalt

 

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