A Brief History of Global Health—“Rats, Lice and History” in Action!

Wandering the planet in search of diseases to cure is not a new concept. Global Health certainly is a focus for the 21st Century, whether or not you are a movie star, a superhero, or Bill Gates! Most of us remember anecdotal history stories about “Dr. Livingstone, I presume.” Dr. Livingstone bush-whacked his way through Africa and encountered several tropical diseases as well as what we now know as malaria. With the onset of internet, frequent travel, and advanced international public health issues we find global health to be a connecting factor affecting the well-being and progress of all nations today. Volunteering in this area is a major way to help meet the increasing demands for worldwide health improvement.

So how did we get here? About 25 years ago, Rotary International began what is now a worldwide crusade to eradicate polio from the globe. The World Health Organization outlined the program and partnered with Rotary to provide the volunteer man/woman-power. “Polio Plus” took its place among the most effective international health campaigns of our time. With the help of other foundations and contributions (Gates Foundation matching grants, for example) we are close to ending this devastating disease. This campaign paved the path to the Global Health Initiative of2009, establishing the President’s Emergency Plan for Aids Relief. Commonly known as “PEPFAR”, this funding is dedicated to the global focus on HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention. PEPFAR funding oversight has been the responsibility of several governmental organizations including the CDC, and they partner with non-governmental and professional organizations to implement global health initiatives. This of course is a very high level summary; it should be noted that several other public and private international health funding streams exist in addition to PEPFAR.

Along with several other laboratory professional partnering organizations, ASCP has been working with the CDC for many years on improving and strengthening laboratory capacity in many PEPFAR funded countries around the globe. Projects include phlebotomy training, quality management, operational expertise, curriculum development for university training programs, and just about everything in between. One of the best ways to connect and build rapport with our international colleagues is by comparing and contrasting standard operating procedures, supply chain processes, teaching and training methods, and process improvement projects. I have had the good fortune to participate in all of these laboratory improvement initiatives. I learn something new every time I participate.

Laboratory professionals know that without a quality laboratory, healthcare is compromised. The Mayo School of Health Sciences reports that 60-70% % of healthcare decisions requires laboratory diagnostics (and it’s even higher in pediatrics). What better way to make the world a better place than to improve and strengthen the quality, safety, and operational effectiveness of our laboratories worldwide? On a personal level, it’s a way to give back to the profession that has enriched my life and given me so much over the years.

Global and international health affects all of us, and this century will be one of global initiatives and improvements worldwide. We can all make a difference locally, regionally, internationally. No matter where your focus and heart for laboratory improvement lies, you can make a difference. We’re all a part of the world’s big and interconnected laboratory! I’ll look forward to hearing about YOUR interest and involvement one day. Next time let’s explore some of the passions and pitfalls of being an international volunteer.

If you’re ever in Windhoek, Namibia during the last part of the rainy season, be sure to try the big white and meaty omajova (Oshiwambo for mushrooms…). They are the size of flying saucers, (no exaggeration!) and really, really good fixed just about any way you can imagine! If you’d like to see a picture of them and maybe a recipe from my favorite German chef in Windhoek feel free to email me at bsumwalt@pacbell.net.

Beverly Sumwalt

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