Resolutions

Have you thought about your New Year’s resolution yet? Hopefully you haven’t thought about when you’re going to break it. In addition to personal goals, we should all think about resolutions that we can make professionally. Whether it is stick to productivity numbers or finally finish that last credit to get another certification, this is the time of year to think about how you can grow in 2014. Our personal lives can affect our professional life and it is the balance between these two that keeps us sane and able to go back to work day after day. When one takes a little too much of your time you must step back and figure out where that fulcrum needs to be placed.

Growth in any career can be small steps or can be a leap such as another degree or promotion. Every person’s career is on a different trajectory and it really is up to the individual on how far they want to go. It is the decisions we make that shape our careers. Some people will tell you to be aggressive and take what you think you deserve, and others will say be patient, put in the work, and good things will come your way. (I wrestled in high school so you can take a guess at which philosophy I follow!) Whichever one you follow the big decisions and hard work you put in will only take you as far as you want it to. I have met many people my age that are happy working on the bench and have no aspirations of being a supervisor. Whatever you choose to do you should be happy and feel engaged that the work you’re doing is helping people. We are in healthcare and even though a lot of us don’t directly see patients the work we do helps nurses and physicians help the patient.

With only a couple weeks left in 2013 this is a great time to reflect on personal and professional accomplishments while also getting ready to start a new year that is full of new challenges and also new opportunities. As I usually say, no challenge is too large to take on and no opportunity is too small to overlook. For example I wrote an article for Lab Medicine and gave a 5 year progress report on my career and it turned into an opportunity to blog for one of the most important organizations for the laboratory profession. I always wanted to take the ideas I had in my own lab and throw them out there and see what other people thought of them and how they do certain things. When we write these blogs we love to hear comments and discussions of how you the reader interact and “live” in your own laboratory. Reflecting on 2013 I’m thankful for Lab Medicine for this great opportunity and my resolution for 2014; I’m going to be moving up that ladder, one rung at a time.

 

Herasuta

Matthew Herasuta, MBA, MLS(ASCP)CM is a medical laboratory scientist who works as a generalist and serves as the Blood Bank and General Supervisor for the regional Euclid Hospital in Cleveland, OH.

Red Tape

I like debates so I’m going to start one and I hope people will comment below and get a dialogue going. How many pieces of paper do you have framed on your wall in the lab from regulatory bodies? If you are a reference lab that serves nationwide customers you may be putting up regulatory wallpaper! I have heard of more and more inspections in regards to laboratories.. My laboratory is inspected by CLIA, CAP, and AABB. With budgetary constraints the importance of the AABB certification has been discussed numerous times. I even feel myself that AABB is becoming more of a consulting company that publishes medically relevant treatment recommendations than an inspection body. I would like to see consolidation between CAP and AABB where the somewhat higher standards of AABB are adopted by CAP and laboratories would not have to pay separate fees for each.

Let’s take it a step further. If CLIA inspections are increasing are there rising tensions between them and CAP? What is making CLIA step up? Do they not trust the job that CAP is doing performing inspections of the laboratories? If CLIA inspections are becoming that difficult what do you as a manager/supervisor put your efforts toward to ensure you will be compliant no matter who inspects you? How does a laboratory go through 3 or more inspections a year and still stay on top of everything else? All these questions must be answered and quickly if you expect to have time to do what is required of you as a manager/supervisor. I don’t think too many laboratorians would care who inspects them, but I do think we would care about having one universal checklist that we can abide by and really dig in to what is important to keep the lab accurate and safe.

How are we expected to grow our business and serve our patients when we are constantly guessing on what checklist to abide by or who is coming to inspect us? We are consolidating in every other sector of healthcare to improve efficiency except in regulatory bodies. Is this just another consequence of big government or do we actually need them all? We should start the discussion and make our voices heard on what we feel we need from regulatory bodies to ensure we are doing our jobs as laboratorians. Are you as frustrated as I am? Or have I inadvertently started my career as a lobbyist for the laboratory field?  Comment below.

-Matthew Herasuta

Acquisitions and Takeovers

Early in my MBA classes I had one professor with over 35 years in Healthcare consulting say to the class, “There are very few examples of actual mergers; usually someone is acquired or someone is taken over.” This resonated with me when my previous hospital was informed that in 90 days we would be closing the doors. Now, it resonates with hospitals at an increasingly rapid rate. If you’re a person who loves keywords, “integration” will be your new favorite on the list. I currently sit on two integration committees (Blood Bank, Education) where we discuss the different ways we do things and how we can standardize our procedures to make sure that a patient receives the same testing at any Cleveland Clinic location. As big healthcare systems acquire more and more independent entities, integration will be the axiomatic factor to their future success.

If you’re a small community hospital laboratory manager/supervisor that has just received word you are going to join in a partnership with a large system, what next? The really big issues that laboratories deal with are instrumentation and supply chain. Once your service contracts are up, you’ll need to switch to the systems the big laboratory uses. You will be thrust into a much larger network of people and more importantly, talent. If you have open spots you will have a larger talent pool to pull from much easier than going to the job sites.

The biggest challenge you will have is watching your services be consolidated. If you were a full service hospital you will more than likely lose some services and this can have an effect on your test menu in the lab. Low volume but high profit tests will almost always be consolidated into a single location to get the most profit out of it. The send out department of your lab may become much busier because of this increased workload. The system will try its absolute hardest to lower their cost structure and this will include changes in your laboratory.

On a personal level the first thing to do as a manager/supervisor when you find out your hospital is being acquired is don’t panic. Very rarely do they come in immediately and “clean house”. They usually have a period of time when talent is evaluated and then decisions are made. The real question becomes do you want to work for the new system? The integration period can be difficult and time consuming. If you feel your hospital may be acquired, stay prepared. Keep your resume updated and just scan the job sites every once and a while and see what is out there. My biggest piece of advice is don’t get caught in a situation you have no control over. You are the manager/supervisor of the laboratory so you are the reason that it succeeds or fails. These are the same reasons the managerial staff is kept or let go once an acquisition has been completed.

This consolidation is only going to increase as the new healthcare legislation takes effect. Decreasing reimbursement from the government will force entities to combine forces and form systems of healthcare. Put yourself at the forefront and know what in your test menu that you could do without and what you could use from a larger system to be more profitable. When the time comes you are the talent they are looking to acquire, not take over.

-Matthew Herasuta

Under the Hood

I like to keep some humor in the lab so when I see a technologist with a panel off a machine trying to troubleshoot an issue I will say “Uh-Oh, why do you have the hood up?” It’s a little tension breaker, especially if they are stressing about having their instrument down. It also acts as a little reset button so I can go through the troubleshooting steps with them. As technologists, we are modern day mechanics. We use instruments much more than we perform manual testing, and we are expected to be able to troubleshoot instruments that are more complex than the current day automobile.

Acquiring new instrumentation can be a lab changing experience. Each instrument has its quirks and special requirements. The vendors usually offer on site or even off site training for staff once the instrument is purchased. Who you send to these training sessions is just as important as the quality of training they receive. These sessions are where your staff will learn maintenance, operation, and most importantly troubleshooting. When your shiny new analyzer goes down, and it will, the time it takes to get it back up and running affects productivity, turnaround time, and staff morale. Nothing is more detrimental to a staff’s morale then coming into work and the first thing they hear is that the instrument they are on that day is already down. Having experienced that exact thing I can tell you it takes the wind right out of you.If it happens consistently you will see a decreased engagement by staff.

Whom should you send for analyzer training? You should have a good mix of talent and maybe some of the lower performing staff. This assures that you are keeping your talented staff engaged and shows weaker performers that you are invested in building them into a top performer. The question becomes, how do I make sure that the people I send get the most out of their experience? Let them know they will be responsible for presenting the material they learned to the rest of the staff once they get back from training. If any of your staff have an issue with that they are not the ones you should send. These small presentations will help with team building as well as solidifying the information for the key operator.

As leaders we must pick our key operators very carefully. When these choices become important is most likely when we won’t be in the office. Observe the staff that likes to troubleshoot instruments or that keep a level head once instruments are down. You want to make sure that once the hood goes up you have the best mechanic for the job.

-Matthew Herasuta

Reference Intervals vs. Reference Change Values

If we didn’t use reference intervals (RI), how would we know whether a person is “normal” or not? Or more accurately, how would we know whether a lab test result indicated health or disease? Reference intervals have been around as long as lab tests and they help clinicians diagnose and monitor a patient’s disease state. .

Most RI are developed using a specific patient population and should be used only with that population. However, some RIs are “health-based,” such as cholesterol and vitamin D. Both these analytes have RI that indicate what amount of the analyte should be present in a healthy individual, not how much is present in your specific population of patients. In general, health-based RI can be utilized in all populations, as long as the analyte assays are commutable. Thus these type of RI are often more useful than population-based intervals.

But should we be using reference intervals at all? One problem with population-based RI is that any given individual’s values may span a range that covers only part of the population RI due to biological variability. For example, an individual’s creatinine may be 0.6 – 0.9 mg/dL regularly. Since the RI for creatinine for his population is 0.4 – 1.4 mg/dL, a value of 1.2 mg/dL would not be flagged as be abnormal. However, 1.2 mg/dL may very well be an abnormal result for this individual We need to consider using reference change values (RCV) in addition to RI.

Reference change values are calculated values that are used to assess the significance of the difference between two measurements. Essentially, a RCV is the difference that must be exceeded between two sequential results for a change to be a significant change. The calculation requires knowledge of the imprecision of the analyte assay (CVA) and the biological variation (CVI) of the analyte. The formula for calculating RCV is: RCV=21/2 · Z · (CVA2 + CVI2)1/2 , where Z is the number of standard deviations for a given probability. Luckily, labs know the imprecision of their assays and there are tables available for biological variation.

It’s very likely that neither RI nor RCV by itself is adequate for interpreting analyte results. Using both may be a better alternative, especially using RCV for monitoring disease progression or therapeutic efficacy. Flagging sequential values that exceed the RCV—and reporting this change—should be considered.

-Patti Jones

Decisions, Decisions–Part 1

I’ve been reading a book called Leadership and Medicine by Floyd D. Loop. In it, he writes about decision making and its importance in leadership in all industries. In laboratory medicine, choices must be made quick and definitively. This skill can be observed early in a technologist’s career, often even as they train during their clinical rotations. As leaders we can pinpoint the quick thinkers and those who will have what it takes to make the larger decisions once they become leaders themselves. As leaders our decisions have more impact as we work our way up the ladder until the decisions we make affect entire organizations. Decision making at the executive level can be daunting and seal your fate as a success or the figurehead to blame.

The most important decision a leader can make is choosing their team members. Selecting a team that is similar to you may not always be the smartest decision. If you surround yourself with likeminded people, you will miss information and make ill-informed decisions. Contrary thinking will bring different sides of an issue to light. It can be hard to interview—let alone hire–someone you know doesn’t think like you, but their alternative view could strengthen your team. When I interview for leadership positions one of my first questions is, “Is this your first round of candidates or have you passed on any candidates?” If they have re-posted or passed on candidates they are not afraid to wait to find a person who fits their needs.

Most people make lists for projects that need completed. Ever write down a list of decisions that need to be made and their deadline? Former CEO of The Cleveland Clinic Dr. Loop writes, “Some leaders believe that all decisions must be grand in scope. The facts are that most decision making involves small details that add up to a larger goal.”

All of these decisions are null without one thing, trust. Trust in yourself as a leader as well as trust that you are a good decision maker from the people you lead. Decision making is at the heart of any organization and as leaders we must look for team members that can complement our weaknesses and build trust as we lead. With those two in hand you will find yourself making better decisions.

-Matthew Herasuta

Do You Know How to Build a High-Performance Team?

How successful have you been in your hiring high performers? That’s a question that opened an excellent session today at ASCP’s 2013 Annual Meeting entitled “Mis-Hires: How to Avoid Making One and How to Avoid Being One.” Lewis Hassell,MD, Director of Anatomic Pathology in the Department of Pathology at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and a faculty member of ASCP’s Lab Management University, described the “ABC” ranking of employees.

At one end of the spectrum are “C” employees, those that make managers happy when they join someone else’s team, said Hassell. The “A” employees are the ones that always come through for you—the ones mangers want to hire.

“B” employees are in the middle, but in the right environment, said, Hassell, these can become “A’s.”

On average, managers succeed in finding “A” level employees about 40–60% of the time, but studies show that managers can boost that rate to over 90%. How? By altering their hiring practices.

The usual approach—screening CV’s and inviting promising candidates in to interview—favors candidates that make a strong first impression. Job seekers can game this system; they can pad resumes and produce answers they think hiring managers want to hear. This approach, said Hassell, values a candidate’s affability and availability over attitudes and abilities.

On average, managers succeed in finding “A” level employees about 40–60% of the time, but studies show that managers can boost that rate to over 90%. How? By altering their hiring practices.

Managers might gain more insight into a candidate’s judgment, integrity, and passion, he said, by presenting the job candidate with a scenario. Ask candidates about a challenge they encountered in a previous position and how they responded, suggested Hassell. “Candidates who can’t think of a challenge probably aren’t ‘A’ level,” he said. Don’t overlook red flags, he said, or even pink ones. Don’t readily dismiss eccentricities, try not to hire out of desperation, and don’t choose a candidate merely because they’re better than the last person who held the job, he cautioned.

Job seekers can also maximize their career success by carefully assessing the quality of the organization they’re about to join, not just the location or the financial remuneration. Hassell admonished job seekers to do their due diligence in order to join an organization that will enable them to function at an “A” level.

Students of Lab Management University who could not attend this session in person can see a recorded version of it in October at Lab Management University. I encourage job seekers and hiring managers alike to watch it.

-Michelle Hoffman, Director, ASCP Publications