My 3Ts: Trials and Tribulations of Technology!

Like so many others, I figured it wouldn’t happen to me. Like countless others, I have been through the fires of Hades trying to straighten out a “hacked” email account. Like numerous others, I’ve come away from the experience knowing more and enjoying less of my techno-challenged universe! Changing your email address is about as complicated as changing your DNA. Consider, it’s not just closing down “yahoo” and opening up “gmail.” It’s re-capturing the twenty-year list of professional and personal contacts that were compromised and will never be found again. Or the list of archived documents that hold the history of your collective files, reference materials, all the “stuff” you keep. Never mind the cartoons and pictures…I gave up on those long ago.

After my gnashing of teeth and ultimate resolve to fix the issue, it occurred to me what a huge problem it would be to re-create a “hacked laboratory.” In the laboratory, it would be like wiping out every send-out log, every result, every known micro or blood bank patient history, every phlebotomy encounter, and every patient demographic that exists. Well, you get the picture! It’s a “do over” at the highest level. Back-up and clouds aside, it would be very difficult. What computers have done FOR us is to standardize and streamline data collection, improve error rates, and decrease turnaround times for diagnoses, test results and treatment. All VERY good things. I would also propose that….if a process is broken or not working, adding computerized technology only speeds it up and makes it go really really fast….it doesn’t fix the process! Technology is an enabler, and should be used to enhance where needed. As laboratory professionals, in addition to learning the skills of “medical technology”, we are also rely on LIS systems, HIS integrations, and the other “non-medical technologies” that make our systems more efficient. I encourage us all to remember that we must also focus first on improving our processes, so that when they go fast, they also go well. Having someone hack my email forced me to look at my processes…and indeed, some of them were going fast but needed improvements!

Technology is what we do. Technologist is in our title and licensure. It seems to me that science geeks, which most of us are, weren’t prepared to be computer geeks as well….and therein lies the hope for an even better next generation of “medical technologists.” Are we indeed still medical, still seeking continuous improvement and quality processes for our patients, or are we just highly computerized technology teams who can deliver results really fast? Something to ponder…

Cheers!

 

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Beverly Sumwalt, MA, DLM, CLS, MT(ASCP) is an ASCP Global Outreach Volunteer Consultant.

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