Personal Genome Testing and You

The recent events with 23andme and the Food and Drug Administration have brought personal genomic testing into the spotlight. In case you haven’t been following the case, the FDA wrote a warning letter to 23andme—a company that will access various points on your genome and give you the results for around $99—that basically states that because the tests diagnose, mitigate, or prevent disease they require regulatory clearance. The FDA also said false positive results for certain breast or ovarian cancer markers could lead to unnecessary preventative surgery.

Since receiving the letter, 23andme as stopped marketing their genetic testing service. At this writing I’m not aware of the status of ongoing testing or if the company is still accepting new samples. 23andme has 15 working days from the date of the letter—which would be 12/13—to let the FDA know how they’re working to resolve the noted issues.

How does this affect laboratory medicine? On the face of it, not that much. Yes, clinical laboratory scientists and pathologists could lose their jobs of the 23andme labs were forced to close their doors. The field of personal genome testing is a relatively new one—23andme began testing in 2008—but even so, it’s important to realize that this type of testing can positively affect laboratory professionals and pathologists.  More laboratories equal more jobs, after all, and not just for bench techs and pathologists, but for consultants, inspectors, and administrators as well. I know that I’ll be watching to see how this plays out.

-Kelly Swails

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